Popular Posts

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

“Special Menus Index, Part LXVI: Thanksgiving 2012 Dinner Menu—Famous Restaurant Entrees is Today’s Topic as the Chef presents his Entrée and its Immediate Accompaniments!” by Chef Elmer K. “the Hooter” Hootenstein



We continue offering albums by Love, one of the psychedelic 1960s best bands out of Los Angeles, CA, like their cohorts, the Doors and the Byrds.  Love’s TWENTY-FIRST album, “False Start,” appeared in record stores in 2008 and sees the band reunited (or what’s left of it) ready to pick up where they left off.   This is an excellent album and highly worthwhile for music aficionados so we urge you to take the handy link to Amazon.com and buy it now!






COUNTDOWN TO THE END OF THE MAYAN CALENDAR



Here is the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 40 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!



STINKBUG 2012





Chef Elmer K. “the Hooter” Hootenstein

END Commentary 11-14-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 3,647.



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Wednesday, November 14, 2012 by Chef Elmer K. “the Hooter” Hootenstein





SPECIAL MENUS INDEX, PART LXVI

Special Menus Index, Part LXVI: Thanksgiving 2012 Dinner Menu—Famous Restaurant Entrees is Today’s Topic as the Chef presents his Entrée and its Immediate Accompaniments!” by Chef Elmer K. “the Hooter” Hootenstein



Bakersfield, CA, 11-14-2012 W: Today, we arrive at the important part of our Holiday Menu, the ENTRÉE part, something we need to pay a great deal of attention.  I have borrowed a part of El Chilote’s Thanksgiving 2011 Holiday Turkey Recipe published last year in early November to keep the continuity between recipes simplified for the benefit of the readership.  The fact that we borrow from one another as well as use from a pool of standard recipes makes it that much easier to put our recipes together in a timely manner.  Otherwise, we would be putting in even more hours than we already do, which would make our day jobs difficult (for those of us who work) and would become even more difficult. Then, when the time comes for us to publish our joint, long-awaited massive encyclopedia of the culinary arts, the kind of compendium that will become standard fare for all culinary programs across the United States, we would be bone-tired.  I know that my good friend and boss, Stinkbug, would love to acquire the position of foodservice director at Bakersfield College so he could dispense with hated fake, Patrick Coyle, a long-term intern of the foodservice arts.  The fact that Mr. Coyle (we won’t even call him “chef”) gained his experience from the U. S. Military (no slap to the men and women in the service) should have disqualified him from the posting in the first place but once our book is published, Stinkbug will put in a bid for his job.  It will be the kind of bid you can’t refuse.   

This turkey recipe is one that is tasty, spectacular, and a joy to not only make but to eat!  We truss it in the classic sense, making it presentable at tableside in all situations, whether they are at home, in fine dining, or in institutional foodservice like in retirement homes, one of the growing industries requiring full-time chefs and cooks.  I urge you to study this one closely, work hard at perfecting it, and take many photos of the final dish.  We would be grateful if you would send us your photos—thank you!

Here’s the menu for this year’s holiday, which, by the way, takes place NEXT week on Thursday, November 22, 2012:

THANKSGIVING 2012 DINNER MENU

LE MENU:

I.                #1701 Cranberry Gelatin Salad

II.              #1702 Fruit Slaw with Fruit Dressing

III.            #1703 Sea Foam Salad

IV.            #1704 Cream of Red Potato Soup with Chives

V.              #1705 Roasted Turkey with Maple-Orange Glaze

VI.            #958 Turkey Dressing with Wild Rice

VII.         #1705 Turkey Gravy II

VIII.       #847 English Roasted Potatoes

IX.            #1025 Sauteed Red Swiss Chard

X.              #931 Huntsman’s Pilaf

XI.            #1710 Rosemary Brussels Sprouts and Carrots

XII.          #134 Buckwheat Fantans

XIII.       #1706 Russian Romanoff Custard with Whipped Cream

I use nothing but fresh turkeys, especially Foster Farms, one of the top producers of quality fowl anywhere in the nation.  They tell me that they medicate the birds the least and allow them plenty of room in which, to roam so that they’re not caged 24/7/365.  It is important that we treat our feathered friends humanely and that people know exactly how the poultry farmers handle them.  No one should ever eat an animal that’s been tortured and I do believe that the ASPCA and PETA do yeoman’s work in maintaining the health, welfare, and preparation of the animals.  Sure, the latter would prefer us NOT to eat meat at all but I say, “To hell with them and that idea” but I do acknowledge the fact that NO one should ever mistreat, mishandle, or make the lives of any domesticated animal (or wild one) any harsher than they already are and indeed should improve their lots in life.    

Here’s our entrée and its accompaniments:

(#1705) ROASTED TURKEY WITH MAPLE-ORANGE GLAZE



It’s good to have several different preparations for making roasted turkey and I guarantee this one to be among the best I've ever done.  I love using Foster Farms fresh turkeys as they have flavor that is unbeatable by any frozen bird.  It is something that everyone notices, appreciates, and compliments the chef on, so never use anything else.

Yield:  8-12 servings / Mis-en-place: 4-5 hours:



Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
The Turkey:
1
16-18#
Foster Farms whole turkey

1
Each
Lemon, halved

Kosher salt and pepper seasoning

1
Tablespoon
Whole thyme

2
Teaspoons
Whole marjoram

2
Cups
Softened butter

.5
Cup
Farmer John Maple Bacon, diced fine

2
Sprigs
Fresh parsley

2
Each
Bay leaves

2
Each
Shallots, peeled and finely minced

1
Cup
Celery leaves

1
Each
Carrot, chopped

8-9
Cups
Turkey Dressing with Wild Rice

.25
Cup
Cold water

2
Cups
Vermouth

2
Cups
Chicken broth

.25
Cup
Hennessey Cognac

2-3
Cups
Maple-Orange Glaze (Recipe #1709)
Below

Lemons, Limes, and Kiwis: while Kiwi is not a citrus fruit, lemons and limes are and they’re essential for preparing domestic fowl for the oven.  Be sure to rub the insides and outsides of turkeys, chickens, ducks, and geese prior to cooking.
Method:

1.     Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work.  Set the liver, gizzard, heart, and neck aside until called for.  Heat a standard oven to 400°F or a convection oven—fan “on”—to 350°F.  Spray a large roasting pan with PAM or some such other food release spray and have ready. 

2.     Hold the bird underneath cold running water and rinse it well.  Pat it dry with a towel and then toss that towel in the dirty clothes hamper so it you can sanitize it.  Rub the bird inside and out with the lemon halves paying special attention to the cavity and neck openings.  This will make the bird taste and smell sweeter while it’s cooking.  In fact, this is a good practice for ALL fowl. 

3.     Prepare the Kosher Salt and Pepper seasoning in a bowl, stir in the thyme and marjoram, and then, using an electric mixer equipped with a paddle attachment, combine the seasonings with the softened butter.  Mix well. Now, place the turkey in the prepared roasting pan and rub it inside and out with the seasoned butter mixture until it’s all used up.  Be sure to lift the skin and spread it underneath the skin, too. 

4.     Next, add the bacon, parsley sprigs, bay leaves, shallots, celery leaves, and the chopped carrots into both the main cavity and the neck.  Then, place the prepared Parsnip-Apple Stuffing into both the main and the neck cavities, packing it in the best you can but DON’T overload it, as it will expand during the cooking process.  This is the STUFFING FORMULA: allow for half-a-cup per pound of raw bird.  Should you have any additional stuffing, be sure to bake it in a separate dish.

5.     Now comes the artistic part: trussing the bird.  Using your trussing needle with about 15-20 inches of twine, sew up the back vent by loosely stitching it shut using a back-and-forth motion.  Pull it through the sides of the meat, securing somewhat firmly but not so tight that it will explode during cooking.  Pull the strings together, tie them into a tight knot, cut off, and discard the excess twine.

6.     Thread your trussing needle with about TWO FEET of twine.  Fold the wing tips in until they just about meet in the center of the BACK of the bird.  Fold the neck flap DOWN onto the back.  Then, push the needle through ONE wing and into the shoulder exiting out through the other wing; don’t unthread your needle just yet.

7.     Drop down to the drums.  Squeeze the meat firmly at the bottom by pushing the body upwards while squeezing the drums close to the body.  Still using the string from Step #6, push the needle through the nearest drumstick’s upper part into the body and out through the SAME place on the opposite drumstick; now, cut the string and tie a tight knot as described in Step #5. 

8.     Remove the needle from the string and turn the bird over on the side with the loose ends of the string. Pull the string from the drum closer to the one from the wing and tie a tight knot.  Snip off any excess thread and then re-thread the needle with another two feet of string and turn the bird, breast-side-DOWN, and push the needle through the center of one wing joint into the body and out through the same place on the other side—leave the string attached.

9.     Roll the buttered turkey breast-side-UP again and shove the needle through the lower end of the drumstick, into the body above the vent flap and OUT through the other drumstick in the same place.  Turn the bird on its side once more, pull loose strings together and tie a tight knot closer to the wing joint than the drum.  Again, snip off any excess twine and discard it.

10.  Place the trussed turkey BACK-SIDE-DOWN in the roasting pan and place inside your preheated oven, preferably on the middle or middle-low rack, depending upon your oven’s size, and roast the bird for about 20-30 minutes or until it begins to show signs of browning.  Then, drop the temperature of your oven by 50°F and continue roasting for an additional 4.5-6 hours OR until a quick-temp thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh and into the stuffing reads 180°F.  Note, cooked poultry should ALWAYS read 165°F and the stuffing, which contains eggs, should read 170°-180°F.

11.  While the bird is cooking, make the BASTING mixture by combining the ingredients vermouth, chicken broth, and cognac—this is a standard basting mixture.  Every 20 minutes or so, baste the bird with this mixture and when you’ve used it up, by then, the bird should have produced a sea of drippings.  Continue basting the bird by using those drippings—pick them up in a ladle and pour over and across the cooking bird in order to keep it moist, flavorful, and tender. 

12. Now, during the rest of the time that the turkey is in the oven, baste it almost constantly with the Orange-Maple Glaze (below).  Baste it heavily and as the turkey cooks, continue basting it heavily towards the end so that it has sheen when pulled from the oven.  Once you remove it from the oven, pour any residual glaze remaining over it, glazing it one final time.

13. Should the bird begin to brown too much, spray a piece of aluminum foil with PAM and tent it.  Be sure to protect the wings and the drums as they brown the fastest.  Always tent the wings!

14. When the turkey begins to show signs that it’s done, double-check it.  Take the temperature reading in a variety of places: the breast, the thigh, and the stuffing.  Run a skewer into the thickest part of the thigh and if the ensuing liquid is CLEAR, you've cooked your bird and if it shows signs of BLOOD, continue cooking it until it no longer does. 

15. When BOTH the temperature and the secondary test with the skewer show the bird is done, remove it from the oven and remove the foil.  Be sure to remove ALL of the string—I can never stress this enough—as there’s nothing worse than getting a piece of twine between your teeth—YUCK!

16. Note: roasting the bird at the lower temperature requires a longer cooking time but it cuts down on shrinkage and produces a much-more tenderized bird than if you cook at higher temperatures.  In addition, continuously basting the birds adds to its finished flavor and its tenderness so NEVER omit this part of the process!

17. To carve the bird, place it onto a carving board with the breast facing YOU.  Place your fork between the leg and the breast, then slice the skin between the leg and the body; pull the leg OUT.

18. Carve the breast in a slanting manner so that you’re slicing it—parallel to the rib cage—starting at the wing and working toward the breastplate.  Include some of the stuffing with each slice.

19. Cut the drumstick from the thigh and cut as many thin slices of dark meat as possible.  Cut parallel to the bone once again on both the drums and the thighs.

20. When you’ve carved one side of the bird, turn it around and repeat the procedure on the opposite side.  Alternatively, if you’re not a very good table carver, perform this feat in the sanctity of your kitchen and arrange the sliced pieces on your serving platter for presentation at the table.  Finally, one last important hint before you cut the turkey—MAKE SURE THAT YOUR KNIVES ARE SHARP PRIOR TO SLICING THE BIRD AS OTHERWISE, YOU WILL HAVE A MAJOR MESS ON YOUR HANDS!     

Roasting turkeys is not a difficult thing provided you follow all the steps and pay attention to what you’re doing.  NEVER neglect your bird while it’s cooking and never leave it out at room temperature for very long prior to cooking.  The best way to defrost a turkey safely is to do it within the confines of your refrigerator 5-6 days in advance, so that it defrosts naturally and without being rushed, which can severely alter the texture of the meat.  It’s when you try to speed up the process that it stays out too long at room temperature and becomes a bastion for foodborne illness.  Once stuffed, NEVER leave the turkey out for any length of time and always make sure the stuffing is completely COOL prior to packing the bird with it.  If you place warm stuffing inside a cold bird and then place it inside your oven, there will be a long period of time where the bird will be in the DANGER ZONE: between 45°F and 140°F and this can prove deadly.  It takes an hour or two for the heat of the oven to reach the center and begin cooking it, which means that your bird will be dangerously open to foodborne illness, which could cause illness for your entire family.

The thing to do is always to check with your county health department so that you know what their recommendations are when it comes to cooking your holiday meals.  It’s important to know what’s going on around you so that you don’t commit a grave error and make an otherwise happy occasion into a deadly one that no one will ever forgive or forget.  Always reside on the side of being safe and NEVER take chances with anyone’s health—it could prove deadly.  At the same time, these warnings are merely to make you be a better cook and chef; don’t be afraid to prepare a holiday meal, just pay attention to what you’re doing.  In professional foodservice, we might cook 100 turkeys or more for a holiday meal in a hotel, country club, or in a hospital and we do it without problems.  You can join us by learning what’s at stake and how to avoid problems.

Here’s the Kosher Salt and Pepper recipe:

(#1324) KOSHER SALT AND PEPPER SEASONING




 
1. Yield: One cup of seasoning:


Parsley Knot: “always make sure you press as much excess green color out of fresh parsley as otherwise, it turns white sauces and cream soups “green,” an unprofessional and undesirable attribute.”

Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
Cup
Kosher salt

1.5
Tablespoon
Coarse black pepper

.5
Teaspoon
Hungarian paprika

.5
Teaspoon
Dry parsley flakes



Method:

21. Combine together and store in an airtight container.

This is a good basic, salt-and-pepper seasoning for which, you will find many uses.

Here’s the Stuffing Recipe:

(#958) TURKEY DRESSING WITH WILD RICE



Yield:  12 cups  / Mis-en-place: about an hour:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
Seasoned Breadcrumbs:
1
Cup
Dried bread crumbs

2.5
Teaspoons
Minced garlic

2.5
Teaspoons
Minced onions

1
Tablespoon
Freshly minced parsley flakes
Rinsed
2.25
Teaspoons
Lawrey’s seasoned salt

.5
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

3/8
Teaspoon
White pepper

3/8
Teaspoon
Whole Italian seasoning

The Stuffing:
2
#
Red potatoes, boiled and grated

3
Cups
Chopped yellow onions

1.5
Cups
Diced celery

.5
Cup
Melted butter

1.25
Cup
Seasoned bread crumbs
From above
1
Large
AA egg

2
Cups
Cooked wild rice

.5
#
Jimmy Dean sage sausage, cooked & diced

3.75
Teaspoons
Poultry seasoning

.75
Teaspoon
White pepper

.5
Teaspoon
Celery salt

.25
Cup
Freshly minced parsley

.5
Teaspoon
Whole summer savory

.5
Teaspoon
Whole rosemary

.5
Teaspoon
Whole sage

.75
Cup
Chicken broth




Method:

22. Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work.  Combine the ingredients listed underneath the seasoned breadcrumbs and set aside. 

23. Meanwhile, cook the potatoes until tender, then plunge into a bowl of ice water.  Chill them enough so that you can grate them. 

24. Heat the butter in a large skillet or rondeau; then, when it begins to sizzle, sauté the celery and onions in the fat until tender until the vegetables are tender and aromatic.  Then, add the rest of the dressing ingredients, blending everything together well, then remove from the heat.

25. When you form the dressing, you can begin stuffing the bird with it and then, place it inside a well-sprayed baking dish, or pan with PAM or some such other food release spray.  In the bird, the stuffing must reach at least 170°F but preferably, 180°F while in the baking dish, 165°F is fine.  The reason for this is the fact that inside the bird, the stuffing has the opportunity to absorb the blood from the residual blood and to do so before the heat of the oven has the opportunity to reach it.  This means that it remains in the Danger Zone of between 45°F and 140°F for much longer than it does within the baking dish.  The addition of raw eggs also requires the higher temperature UNLESS YOU USE EGGBEATERS OR SOME SUCH OTHER PREPARED AND PASTEURIZED EGG MIXTURE—THIS IS ADVISABLE.

26. If you choose to bake it separately, bake it in a 350°F standard oven covered with a piece of PAM-sprayed foil or wax paper to keep it both moist and not overly browned. When cooked, remove and serve it immediately.

I have used this recipe professionally for many years and find it to be both tasty and worth trying by anyone, anywhere, anytime, NOT just during the winter holidays.  Turkey is what you make it and this stuffing gives it personality. 

Here’s the Maple-Orange Glaze for this recipe:

(#1709) MAPLE-ORANGE GLAZE


This glaze is perfect for basting all sorts of meats, whether they are pork, poultry, or even lamb or fish. 

Yield:  1 quart / Mis-en-place: 30 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
3
Cups
Mrs. Butterworth’s maple syrup

1
Cup
Clarified butter

2
Cups
Strained orange juice (no pulp)

1
Tablespoon
Almond extract

2
Tablespoons
Torani’s orange syrup

Cornstarch slurry



Method:

1.     Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Combine the first three ingredients together in a saucepot and bring it to a boil; then, whisk in the cornstarch slurry until it thickens to a moderately thick sauce.  Reduce the heat to low, add the almond extract and orange syrup and allow it to clarify.  Then, remove from the heat and use it. 

2.     You can keep it warm on the steam table or in a Bain Marie. 

3.     Cool leftovers to below 45°F as quickly as possible and then transfer to a sanitized airtight container equipped with a tight-fitting lid; then, label, date, and refrigerate.  Use within 5-7 days.

This is an excellent maple-orange glaze, perfect for basting pork, poultry, and anything else for which it seems beneficial.

--------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this, as it is a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will become dedicated followers of the END.  Currently of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that we hear the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession —join us. We urge our readership to write to us, leave comments, and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously do not pay anything but give YOU full byline and that, my friends, is worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it will be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so Stinky says.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people do not care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It is sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came. Nowadays, we promote the Nerds on Call computer service, these people are phenomenal and we want you to seek service from them!

          Okay, tomorrow is HUMP DAY, that’s a good thing, and then I believe that on the 17th of this month, we wish Itzi Nakamura a happy, happy birthday.  The poor girl is our newest find to the END family of writers and on her maiden voyage, she almost became the first person to do multiple weeks due to her failure to mention the fact that her Thursday installment was HUMP DAY, a noted tradition around here.  If we do anything, we adhere to tradition because without traditions, what does one have? Anarchy and in the world of professional foodservice, there is absolutely NO room for anarchists.  I hope all of these dumb OWS types meet their demise at the hands of real Americans, they belong somewhere else like Venezuela, North Korean, or Cuba.  Anyhow, we will be back tomorrow with still more exciting foods for our fabulous Thanksgiving Day holiday dinner, taking place next week!                                            

Therefore, let us close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by Love and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com—we want to make some money here so help us out by buying something!  Allied with them, we are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

Thank you!

Elmer K. Hootenstein

Elmer K. Hootenstein

CWC, ACF, the Golden State Chefs’ Association

________________________________________________________________________
This is I in a group shot that was a collage on a chef's magazine cover from the 1980's. They took this picture of me in the mid 1970's when I was working as a Food and Beverage Director at a hotel in Fresno, California. I later came to Washington State where I met Stinkbug in the WSCA. We've been friends ever since.





The Hooter writes from Los Angeles, CA.

---30---

The END Commentary for Wednesday, November 14, 2012 by Chef Elmer K. “the Hooter” Hootenstein



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

The one-and-only Chef Elmer K. “the Hooter” Hootenstein wrote this original essay.



Recipe created by Chef Elmer K. “the Hooter” Hootenstein on November 21, 1982 in Bakersfield, CA, created the original recipe whereas I adopted his and increased the quantity)

KEEP READING THE ELEMENTARY NEWS OF THE DAY FOR THE BEST OF CULINARY POLITICS!

http://elementalnewsoftheday.blogspot.com/

read the elemental news of the day for the best news, political commentary, sports, foodservice, hotel and restaurant business, the end times, the end of days, the apocalypse, armageddon, and whatever else happens to pop up!

THIS WEEK:
♂TODAY: THE HOOTER

NEXT WEEK: CHEF FRITZ SCHLEPENDRECHT♂
STINKBUG AT THE COUNTDOWN TO THE END DAYS

This is #0026, a 20” x 16" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Pheasant Phantasy [sic]." It is among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and known around the world for both the beauty and timelessness of her artworks. Hanging in private and public galleries and followed by many fans encircling the globe—her works instill awe because of her artistic brilliance and personal beauty. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It is possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Beverly Carrick: the World’s Greatest Artist!

Pictures #0000-0395



















CAVEAT:

NOTE: EVERYONE WHO WRITES FOR THE ELEMENTAL NEWS OF THE DAY DOES SO UNDER AN ALIAS DUE TO FREQUENT OPINIONS THAT MIGHT NOT ALWAYS BE ACCEPTABLE AT THEIR PLACES OF EMPLOYMENT. PLEASE NOTE, TOO, THAT RECIPES ARE BROKEN DOWN FROM INSTITUTIONAL SIZES, WHICH MEANS THEY DO NOT ALWAYS TRANSLATE PROPERLY AND SEEN AS SUCH.  THANK YOU, Moses Scharbug III.





The above icon is the “Trademark of Quality and Symbol of Integrity/Logo” of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers and of What's Cookin' Productions. This article is copyrighted © 11-08-2012, all rights reserved. Unauthorized reproductions of anything on this blog site, including written material and photographs, are permissible unless granted in writing by Moses Scharbug or Stinkbug. Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.

President: Garfield H. Johnson

Executive Vice President: Alvin T. Woliztnikistein

Publisher: B. Carrick

Assistant Publisher: Roland Carl Davis

Chief Editor: Stinkbug

Assistant Editor: Moses Scharbug III

Mail Room: Jane Lee Tarzana (direct all mail here).

Proofreader: Amos Mosby Caruthers

Amazon.com Liaison: Gilbert R.

Beer: Smokehouse

Board of Directors: Garfield H. Johnson, Alvin T. Woliztnikistein, B. Carrick, B. H. “BC” Cznystekinki, Elmer K. “the Hooter” Hootenstein, Gervais Krinkelmeier, Goldie “Goldfish” McNamara, James “Jimmy” Hall, James, “JT” Tobiason, Kilgore Randalini, Lilah Paulikovich, Murph MacDougal, and Olaf Bologolo,





























MAGNOLIA HILLTOP BREWERS PRODUCTIONS

Tags:

The Hooter, Special Menus, Love, Famous Restaurant Recipes, Turkey, Stuffings and Dressings, Holiday Foods, Holiday Traditions, Gourmet Cooking, Thanksgiving Menu, Glazes,  Good Food,



Trademark of Quality c/o the Elemental News of the Day and Magnolia Hilltop Brewers Productions 2012 of Bakersfield, California, the United States of America.


NOTE—WE SUPPORT JAZ MCKAY AND MR. PUCK OF KNZR 1560 A.M. RADIO IN BAKERSFIELD, CA, BECOMING A SYNDICATED, NATIONWIDE RADIO SHOW! THE MAN IS ONE OF THE ALL-TIME GREATS AND DESERVES TO BE RECOGNIZED FOR HIS CONTRIBUTIONS TO TALK RADIO, THE CONSERVATIVE CAUSE, AND PLAIN COMMON SENSE! THANK YOU!








THE HOOTER
MADE IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA! WE SUPPORT THE MILITARY OF THE UNITED STATES AND THAT OF ITS ALLIES AROUND THE GLOBE!




Thank you for joining me today at the New Elemental News of the Day, I appreciate your company and hope that you bring your friends, family, neighbors, coworkers, and relatives the next time you visit!
BUY “FALSE START” BY Love AT AMAZON.COM NOW!



The Chef’s Culinary Nightmare: the end is indeed coming soon so beware of  December 21, 2012!




Advertisements:


-->


-->


-->


-->


-->


No comments:

Post a Comment

Please leave comments! Thanks! The American Institute of Culinary Politics-Elemental News of the Day!