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Sunday, November 25, 2012

“Coffee Shop Favorites, Part XVII: Bea O’Malley arrives today and shares her Institutional-Sized Recipe for Old-Fashioned Salisbury Steaks ala Jardinière!” by Bea O’Malley



BLUE CHEER released their second album, “Outsideinside,” also in 1968, and followed their debut album with more exceptional hard rock.  This band is among the all-time greats and this album is as revered today as it was back then. A classic hard rockin’ acid band, they made it all the way to 2009 before hanging it up.  You can buy this amazing album by accessing the convenient link below and purchasing it at AMAZON.COM! Thank you!


 

COUNTDOWN TO THE END OF THE MAYAN CALENDAR

 

Here is the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 25 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!

 

STINKBUG 2012

 

 

Bea O’Malley

END Commentary 11-26-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 3,390.

 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CULINARY POLITICS

 

ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Monday, November 26, 2012 by Bea O’Malley

 

 

COFFEE SHOP FAVORITES, PART XVII—INSTITUTIONAL SIZES

Coffee Shop Favorites, Part XVII: Bea O’Malley arrives today and shares her Institutional-Sized Recipe for Old-Fashioned Salisbury Steaks ala Jardinière!” by Bea O’Malley

 

 

Bakersfield, CA, 11-26-2012 M:  Hello, again, friends, I am so happy to be back here in the Stinkbug Chair in our corporate offices in Oildale, California, a short drive down the road from Wasco, home of the famed Rose Festival, an annual event that has taken place for close to a century.  I like coming into Bakersfield and am glad I going to be here for the last days of November and the first days of December.  It’s always good to be around friends and family when we celebrate the holidays and all and to me, if you don’t have family, then what do you have?—pretty much, nothing. 

I was fortunate in that I grew up with a large family and that we did everything together no matter what it was.  Then, I married a man who grew up in similar circumstances and we raised a large family of our own.  We plan to have a great holiday season this year and even if all shebang breaks loose on the Twenty-First of next month, we will go out in style, all together, and what more can one say?

I  am doing the Coffee Shop Favorites category for this entire week and it’s going to be institutional-sized recipes from here on out.  I am glad to have the category as not often does anyone do it and being among the smallest ones, there’s a lot of room in which to expand it.  I recall a time in the country when upon every corner, a coffee shop rested, and people took their celebrations there, took their business there, discussed this, discussed that, it all happened around a coffee table booth.  Now, thanks to McDonald’s and all the rest of their ilk, it’s over and done, gone, vamanos, and good-bye.  They ran them out of business by undercutting them on prices and much like the way Wal-Mart, Target, and Best Buy have run out local businesses wherever they sprout, so, too, did the fast food franchises, they destroyed the noble coffee shop and left us with nothing but Wendy’s, Burger King, Carl’s Junior, and McDonald’s in their place.  To me, this is very sad, it’s a sad day in this country when one cannot afford to compete.   We will talk more on this subject later.

We are making a classic dish today—Salisbury Steaks in an institutional size, no less, this is one of the famed dishes of old, one that everyone learns when they enter the foodservice profession and this is the way it used to be done, when we made everything from scratch.  Let me know what you think when it’s over and done, okay? Tell Ms. Bea everything, you hear?

(#1027) SALISBURY STEAKS—INSTITUTIONAL SIZE

 

Salisbury Steak is one of the very first recipes I learned from the master under whom I apprenticed as a kid and this to me is sort of like the gateway to one’s culinary career.  A stellar dish, you can make it in a variety of ways and it’s always a good seller, all one needs do is to market it properly.  See the conclusion of the recipe and you will understand what I am saying in this regard. 

 

Yield:  75 7-ounce steaks (before cooking)  / Set-up: 50-60 hours / Mis-en-place: 2 hours:
 

 

Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
30
#
30% ground beef
 
3
Cups
Diced yellow onions
Blanched
3
Cups
Diced carrots
Blanched
3
Cups
Diced celery
Blanched
1
Cup
Diced pimientos
 
10
Large
AA eggs, beaten and strained
 
1
Cup
All-purpose flour
 
.5
Cup
Kosher salt
 
.25
Cup
Black pepper
 
.3331
Cup
Minced garlic
 
1
Gallon
Sauce Brune (Recipe #0253)
 
Seasoned Flour II (Recipe #1592)
 
Peanut oil for browning the meat
 
1.5
Gallons
Beef stock (Recipe #0213) 
 
Jardinière Topping:
2
Cups
Julienned yellow onions
Blanched
2
Cups
Julienned celery
Blanched
2
Cups
Julienned carrots
Blanched
2
Cups
Julienned red bell peppers (seeded/stemmed)
Blanched
2
Cups
Julienned green bell peppers (same)
Blanched
1
Cup
Julienned yellow bell peppers (same)
Blanched
1
Cup
Julienned orange bell peppers (same)
 
The Finish:
Freshly minced parsley flakes
Rinsed

 

Method:
 
 

1.     Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! NOTE: this recipe does everything from the standpoint of doing things from scratch so if you choose to none of the basic setup stocks and sauces, please do what you normally would.  All of these additional things have been included for the sake of historical culinary perspective and the first thing we would need to do would be to prepare our Basic Brown Stock:

(#0213) BASIC BEEF STOCK

 

Unfortunately, currently of ever-growing government, rising taxes, and inflation, one simply cannot afford to do things from scratch in the ways their predecessors did.  Making stocks from scratch is an unnecessary art, replaced by instant dry mixes sold to us by our purveyors or by our grocers.  However, if one wants to do things in the ways of their forefathers, then this is how one makes basic beef stock from start to finish, the basic item necessary to make the entire family of brown sauces. 

Yield:  2.5 gallons  / Mis-en-place: 48 hours:
 

 

Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
5
#
Beef bones (like prime rib bones, etc.)
 
5
#
Reserved steak trim (mostly fat)
 
2
Cups
Gallo Burgundy
 
2.5
#
Bouquet garni (recipe #204)
 
2
Tablespoons
Black peppercorns
 
2
Tablespoons
Dry thyme
 
1
Tablespoon
Top quality beef base
 
4
Gallons
Cold water
 
2
#
Chopped carrots
 
2
#
Chopped celery with leaves and roots
 
2
#
Chopped yellow onions
 
1
#
Chopped red onions
 
1
#
Chopped leeks, scallions, and shallots
 
1
Bunch
Parsley with stems
 
2
Bulbs
Whole garlic
 
4
Each
Bay leaves
 
10
Each
Whole cloves
 
The Finish:
2
Cups
Worcestershire sauce
 

 

Method:

2.     Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work!  Preheat your standard oven to 450°F or your convection oven—fan “on”—to 400°F.  Place the beef bones into a roasting pan and add the fat.  Place inside the hot oven and roast them until they begin to show signs of charcoal on the pan’s floor and of being roasted.  Drop the heat by 50°F and continue roasting them until you render a great deal of oil; drain off and reserve this oil for use in making roux. 

3.     Pour the wine into the pan to deglaze it.  Scrape the charcoal off the bottom with a kitchen spoon making sure to loosen all of it.  Turn off the oven and transfer the bones along with the charcoalized material into a large stockpot and cover with the water.  Add the rest of the ingredients and bring the pot to a boil; when it has, keep it there for 4-5 minutes and then lower the heat to the lowest of lows and simmer for 24-36 hours, checking the level of the liquid occasionally. 

4.     As it simmers, skim off any oil that rises to the surface as well as foam and discard it.  Keep an eye on the pot so that it never runs out of liquid but if you have the flame on LOW, it shouldn’t.  When you have cooked everything more-or-less to mush, pour the broth through a chinois lined with wax paper and another chinois placed atop it.  Remove all debris and residue and discard.  Return the stock to the stove and complete the process:

5.     Return to a boil and add the Worcestershire sauce.  Keep there for several minutes and then lower the flame to low and reduce the liquid to 2.5 gallons or less.  This will concentrate the flavor.  When the process is over, pour the stock through a fine-meshed sieve once more into several large pans placed atop cooling racks.  Place a fan to blow on the stock and bring it down to less than 45°F as quickly as possible; then transfer into Styrofoam containers with lids or some other sanitized storage containers with lids and label as to the contents, the date, and the amount and freeze for use later.

This is the traditional way to make beef broth, a must-have ingredient for kitchens whether at home or professionally.  Always keep stock on hand, as you never know when you will need it to make soup, sauces, or for use in cooking meats such as beef and veal.

6.     Here is the Standard Bouquet Garni recipe:

(#208) STANDARD BOUQUET GARNI

 

 

Yield:  for one gallon  / Mis-en-place: 5 minutes:
 

 

Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
Stalk
Celery
 
3
Each
Carrots
 
1
Each
Onion
 
2
Each
Leeks
 
1
Piece
Bay leaf
 
1
Sprig
Fresh thyme
 
.5
Piece
parsnips
 

 

Method:

7.     Mis-en-place: Wash and clean all vegetables. Halve the vegetables and combine with the herbs in a large piece of cheesecloth. Then, tie it all up and this is what you’ll use when you make your stocks. It’s easy to put it in and easy to take it out. This is the basic of basics.

     Note: parsnips are not always included so you must consider the final flavor you seek. Some stocks do not benefit from their flavor so always keep that in mind. Some bouquet garnis do not utilize carrots either but I always have. Something else that adds as well is garlic cloves and whole white pepper corns.

 

This is the classic addition to braising meats, poultry, and even seafood.  It’s an important item to have in one’s repertoire.

8.     Here’s the SAUCE BRUNE formula:

(#253) SAUCE BRUNE

 

 

Yield:  one gallon / Mis-en-place: 12-16 hours:
 

 

Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2
Gallons
Superior Veal stock
 
2
Cups
Reserved beef drippings
 
3
Cups
All-purpose flour
 
1/3
Cup
Kosher salt
 
2-2/3
Tablespoons
White pepper
 
8
Each
Bay leaves
 

 

Method:

9.     Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Make stock from beef or veal bones.  Roast the bones in a 375°F standard oven or a 325°F convection oven—fan “on”—for at least two hours; be sure to add some vegetable oil and some vegetable scraps such as yellow onions, celery, leeks, and carrots.  Turn the bones over while they cook, taking great care to scrape up the caramelized deposits on the pan’s bottom.  When the bones are dark, pour off and strain the oil and reserve it; place the pot over a medium flame and cover with water.  Bring to a boil, keep there for 4-5 minutes, and then reduce the flame to very low and simmer the bones for an hour or so.  If you start with 5# of bones, cover them with a gallon of cold water and reduce it by half.

10. Once you create the stock, pour it through cheesecloth-lined fine-meshed sieve into a sanitized bowl.  Refrigerate overnight (the reserved oil, too) and the next day, scrape off the fat cap on the surface of the stock.  Combine this with the reserved oil and heat it up: when it is liquid, pour it through a strainer and remove the impurities—discard them.  Save this oil in a clean jar in your freezer after you have taken out the required .25-cup for the roux.

11. Combine the oil with the flour in a small saucepot and cook over a very low flame until its dark brown, stirring frequently.  Meanwhile, place two quarts of the beef or veal stock in a large saucepot and reduce by half over a medium flame.  Add the bay leaf and the seasonings to it while you do this. 

12. When you have ONE gallon of liquid, whisk the liquid into the roux pot; raise the temperature so that it is boiling and whisk furiously as you combine the mixture.  Allow it to boil for 1-2 minutes and then reduce the heat and allow it to simmer over a very low flame for 4-5 minutes.  Check and readjust the seasonings as necessary.  Use this as your basic Brown Sauce or Sauce Brune.

Professional chefs build many other sauces from this basic brown sauce.  Always be sure to create a DARK roux for brown sauces and either a white or a blonde roux for lighter sauces.  You can keep this in the refrigerator or in your freezer for 1-2 weeks and then must discard it.

13. Here’s the Seasoned Flour Formula:

(#1592) SEASONED FLOUR II—STANDARD PREPARATION

 

 

1. About 2.5 cups:
 

 

Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2.5
Cups
All-purpose flour
 
1
Teaspoon
Cayenne pepper
 
1
Teaspoon
White pepper
 
1.5
Teaspoons
Hungarian paprika
 
1.5
Teaspoons
Granulated garlic
 
1
Tablespoon
Kosher salt
 
2
Teaspoons
Parsley flakes
 

 

Method:

14. Combine all ingredients together and store in an airtight jar, baggie, or whatever else and either keep at room temperature or in your freezer until needed.

It’s important to have a seasoned flour recipe for breading different foods and this is a good one.  You will use this recipe many times.

Salisbury Steak Setup:
 
 

15. The Vegetable mirepoix and the jardinière topping: blanch each vegetable group separately from another in simmering salted water or in a steamer.  The moment they are al dente-tender, remove and drain them, and plunge them into ice water to retard all further cooking; then, drain and spin dry using a salad spinner so that excessive moisture doesn’t break the steak recipe. 
 

16. Place the ground beef into the bowl of a Hobart mixer and hook up the paddle attachment.  Begin rotating the paddle around the bowl on low speed to break down the connective tissue contained in the meat BUT DO NOT USE PINK SLIME OR ANY OTHER ADULTEROUS ADDITIVE IN YOUR MEATS!
 

17. Next, add the mirepoix vegetables (carrots, celery, onions, and pimientos) along with the eggs, flour, salt, pepper, and garlic.  Continue rotating the paddle for 4-5 minutes so that you thoroughly distribute the ingredients throughout the meat. 
 

18. Stop mixing, cover the mixing bowl with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for ONE hour; then, bring it out and place it atop a sanitized work surface Begin weighing out individual balls of meat at SEVEN ounces and then transfer each one to a sanitized hotel pan lined with wax paper.  Stack them up atop one another but be sure to place a divider between each level consisting of plastic wrap or paper.
 

19. Return the balls to the refrigerator for about an hour, then bring them out, form each one into a round, and set aside.  Rest the meat again, and then form each round into a hamburger steak.  Prepare the seasoned flour, dust each steak in it and transfer the steaks to a sanitized sheet pan, placing a layer of plastic wrap in between each. 
 

20. Have your griddle heated to 375°F and your ovens ready: using a convection oven, set it at 325°F (using the fan when the meat is within it) or a standard oven set at 375°F.  Now, place a layer of peanut oil down upon your griddle and brown both sides of each steak upon it.  Transfer them into sanitized two-inch full hotel pans and when each one fills up; cover it with a layer of hot Basic Beef Stock.  Then, cover each with a sheet of wax paper sprayed with PAM (sprayed side-DOWN), followed by a sheet of aluminum foil prepared in the same way. 
 

21. Crimp the edges tightly all the way around each pan and when all the Salisbury steaks have been prepared in the same manner and your pans are full, place them onto the middle and lower oven racks, flip on the “on” switch if using the convection oven, and bake for approximately 45-60 minutes. 
 

22. Take care to rotate the pans about the oven several times during the process and when the lesser amount of time is up, lift a corner or two of several of the pans and insert a meat thermometer into the nearest Salisbury steaks and read it.  If it says 165°F, the steaks are ready to serve and if not, continue cooking after re-sealing the edges. 
 

23. When you finish cooking the steaks, remove the pans from the oven, remove their coverings, and pour the residual stock left in the pans down the drain.  You should notice that there is a great deal of separation due to oil released by the ground beef, which is why we will not use it but will pour in a finished sauce. 
 

24. Transfer the Salisbury steaks into a larger holding pan, such as a four-to-six-inch FULL hotel pan and then cover with as much sauce as you can.  Place this pan onto the steam table for easy dish-up, cover with the jardinière vegetables, and then serve with potatoes of choice (traditionally mashed potatoes) and vegetables of choice such as either green beans or green peas.  Dust with freshly minced parsley flakes and serve.
 

25. Leftovers: first, remove whatever jardinière garnish remains, then separate the meat from the sauce, and cool each part separately. Bring both to below 45°F as quickly as possible, then store in sanitized airtight containers by labeling, dating, and refrigerating.  Use as soon as possible (within 1-2 days) or freeze.  Make new sauce if serving Salisbury steaks out of the freezer but if not sold, do not refreeze the meat; toss it out.  The other way leftover Salisbury steaks may be used is by grinding them and the accompanying sauce up and tossing it into one’s chili con carne mixture.   
 

This is the classic, old-time dish served in coffee shops and in fine dining alike across the United States.  It’s still a great special today and you can update it by using higher quality meat in place of the ground beef.  Using steak trim is always wonderful because one can then bill it as “New York Salisbury Steak” or “Filet Mignon Salisbury Steak.” Be innovative, creative, and strive for success!
 

--------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this, as it is a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will become dedicated followers of the END.  Currently of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that we hear the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession —join us. We urge our readership to write to us, leave comments, and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously do not pay anything but give YOU full byline and that, my friends, is worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it will be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so Stinky says.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people do not care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It is sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came. Nowadays, we promote the Nerds on Call computer service, these people are phenomenal and we want you to seek service from them!

          There ya go, that was a mighty-fine, super-long recipe today, folks, I am sure that most of you have done it at one time or another but probably not the way I showed you today.  It is important for everyone to know their culinary heritage as if you don’t, then what do you have, my friends?  Nothing, that’s for sure!                                                       

Therefore, let us close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by BLUE CHEER and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com—we want to make some money here so help us out by buying something!  Allied with them, we are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

Thanks, my friends!

Bea

Bea O’Malley
American Culinary Federation, Inc, Certified Cook, Mixologist, and Foodserver

Here's me back in the 1980’s when I was working at a restaurant in Wasco, CA, my hometown.  I joined the Chefs de Cuisine of Greater Bakersfield, ACF, not long after it was chartered and am still a member even though the chapter is no longer in operation.  I began working in foodservice in the late 1960’s, moved from Wasco, CA, to Monterey, CA, and then returned to my hometown in 2004.  I have been a foodserver, a Mixologist, and am a Certified Cook.  I am equally at home in both the kitchen and behind the bar (and on the floor, too). My passions are numerous and my favorite is working in the bakery whenever I have had a chance.

 

Bea O’Malley writes from Wasco, CA.

---30---

The END Commentary for Monday, November 26, 2012 by Bea O’Malley

 

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

The one-and-only Bea O’Malley wrote this original essay.

 

Recipe created by Bea O’Malley on May 26, 1973 in Wasco, CA, created the original recipe whereas I adopted his and increased the quantity)

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