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Monday, June 4, 2012

“Special Menus Index, Pt. LVIII: Father’s Day Menu 2012, Pt. II—Appetizers Index: Crispy-fried Wontons, Steamed Asparagus with Lemon Buerre Blanc, and Steamed Artichokes with Roasted Red Pepper and Cilantro Aioli—three awesome Appetizers designed to make Dad’s Day a True Delight” by Chef Itzi Nakamura



Today, we continue offering albums by STEPPENWOLF!   Their TWELFTH album—“Hour of the Wolf”—was released in 1975 and was the best of the reformed band’s career and never would they ever release another album of the same quality!  It is one of the best albums of the 1970’s and one you will definitely want to buy so go to Amazon.com and buy it NOW!  Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.  




COUNTDOWN TO THE END OF THE MAYAN CALENDAR…


Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 201 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!



STINKBUG 2012





Chef Itzi Nakamura

END Commentary 06-05-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 3,823.



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Tuesday, June 05, 2012 by Chef Itzi Nakamura

SPECIAL MENUS INDEX, PT. LVIII

 Special Menus Index, Pt. LVIII: Father’s Day Menu 2012, Pt. II—Appetizers Index: Crispy-fried Wontons, Steamed Asparagus with Lemon Buerre Blanc, and Steamed Artichokes with Roasted Red Pepper and Cilantro Aioli—three awesome Appetizers designed to make Dad’s Day a True Delight” by Chef Itzi Nakamura



Bakersfield, CA, 06-05-2012 T: Today, we begin our second day of my first week writing for the Elemental News of the Day and we’re going to make some ono appetizers with which to enliven our Father’s Day menu.  There’s nothing better than the men sitting outside enjoying their mixed drinks, beer, and eating grinds out there with their buds.  The women, meanwhile, are inside doing the cooking and taking food out to the guys who are clustered around the picnic tables that everyone over here has on their lanais.  It is always a festive atmosphere and the first thing any visitor or new resident of Hawaii learns is that everything that is special is celebrated with a luau of sorts.  Everyone brings over their best foods; the booze is flowing, and sometimes, so is the pakalolo.  Don’t get me wrong, I don’t smoke the wild weed but over here, it’s pretty much legal like it is in California and a handful of other places.  It is part of the menu for many so we have the idea of live and let live and it seems to work well.  Anyhow, how is your preparation going for your Father’s Day holiday?  I hope its going well because we’re ready to go and hope that you are, too.  I love buying gifts for my father, he’s a special man and a great chef and it’s very difficult to find him anything he hasn’t seen or that he wants so I must go online and look for stuff that’s really unique.  Maybe I’ll get him a Steppenwolf album! No, just kidding, he’d murder me! BUT you be sure to go buy one today, “Hour of the Wolf” is a classic, it’s one of my favorite albums!

Okay, appetizers are on the menu today and I am going to provide some additional information as to how to prepare artichokes and asparagus as both are essential to being able to make the recipes.   Everyone loves veggie appetizers—but only if they’re properly cooked and not overdone and nasty.  It is important that one always pays close attention to what they’re doing so that they don’t end up serving mush—that is never acceptable!

Here’s our Menu:

FATHER’S DAY 2012 MENU

I.                   Tomato and Green Bell Pepper Salad

II.               Tam O’Shanter Tortellini Salad

III.            Old-Fashioned Coleslaw

IV.             Fresh Steamed Artichoke with Roasted Red Pepper Aioli

V.                Fresh Steamed Asparagus with Lemon Buerre Blanc

VI.             Crispy-fried Wontons

VII.         Boston-style Baked Beans 

VIII.      Saffron Potatoes

IX.             Piñon Nut Pilaf

X.                Lime Butter Steak ala Juan

XI.             Broiled Swordfish with Pineapple Salsa and Fish Juice

XII.         Stuffed Zucchini

XIII.      Three-Squash Sauté

XIV.       Grilled Vegetables

XV.          Coconut Cream Pie

XVI.       Fresh Nectarine Betty

XVII.   Mai Tai

XVIII.                        Malibu Cove 

XIX.       Cannonball

XX.          Angel’s Delight

XXI.       Cold Irish

XXII.   Jamaican Dust

Okay, here we go with our first appetizer, the delicious Crispy Wonton!

(#1611) CRISPY-FRIED WONTONS


It is important that all foodservice establishments that have banquets, do catering, or have busy bars have a great list of reasonably-priced appetizers that can be easily made and are very popular.  Crispy-fried wontons are one such tasty tidbit that allow the chef to use up leftover soup ingredients, leftover meats and vegetables, and whatever else may present it.  To that, they add a bit of garlic and ginger, some wonton wrappers (available in most grocery stores’ chilled cases by the cheeses and meats), and cornstarch.  They can be made quickly, cook extremely fast, and can be sold for much more than they’re worth—what could be wrong about that?  Yes, wontons are a great appetizer and one you’ll sell around the clock.

Yield:  50+ wontons  / Mis-en-place: 30-40 minutes:



Kingsford’s Cornstarch

Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
Package
Wonton wrappers

Cold water

Cornstarch

Filling

Oil for deep-frying


Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! First of all, wontons are a great way to use up leftover entrees and vegetables as they’re a deep-fried appetizer, perfect for use on banquets, hors d’oeuvres parties, and cocktail gatherings.  What one does is to take a leftover item such as a soup and strain out ALL liquid and then add it to a hot skillet with sesame oil and sauté it with the addition of chopped up bean sprouts. 

2.      Next, you take this cooked mixture and add garlic and ginger and then chop it fine.  Place it into a colander and press out as much liquid as is possible.  When you’ve done this, prepare to make your wontons. 

3.      Lightly dust your work surface with cornstarch and lay out a row or two of wontons.  Brush two of the edges with cold water and then put a small mound of filling within it.  Sprinkle it with a bit more cornstarch and then fold it over so that you have a triangular shape.  Place them onto a sheet pan lined with wax paper upon which you’ve sprinkled additional cornstarch.  Wrap with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

4.      The purpose of the cornstarch is to maintain dryness and to keep them sealed so don’t worry about sprinkling them with too much.  Once in the refrigerator, they’ll be well-chilled and become firm so that when it’s time to deep-fry them, they’ll crisp up quickly.

5.      Heat the deep-fat fryer to 375°F.  Bring out the wontons and drop them into it in groups that it can accommodate.  Shake the handles of the fryer baskets gently to loosen them and fry for a minute or two or until a crispy, golden-brown.  As soon as they’re done, remove them and dump them out onto a sheet pan lined with towels.

6.      To serve, place them into a chafing dish and take out to a chafer to keep warm.  Place bowls of tempura dipping sauce alongside them for dipping by the guests.  Here’s your Tempura Dipping Sauce recipe:

(#381) TEMPURA DIPPING SAUCE



This is a good all-around sauce to be used for all your tempura-dipping needs:

Yield:  about 3 cups  / Mis-en-place: 12-15 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
 5
Tablespoons
Coleman’s dry mustard

.25
Cup
Water

 1.75
Cups
Shoyu

3
Ounces
Rice wine vinegar

6.5
Tablespoons
Oyster sauce

1.75
Teaspoons
Sesame oil

.25
Teaspoon
Hot chili oil




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Combine the first TWO ingredients in the bowl of an electric mixer, blending well, on low speed with the use of a whip.  Allow it to firm up and then add the remaining ingredients.  Store in a sanitized container with a tight-fitting lid or serve in an attractive serving bowl, preferably with an oriental motif alongside appetizers such as crispy-fried wontons or with tempura dishes.

This is an excellent dipping sauce for all your Asian food needs. Keep the recipe handy as it will be used time and again! When added to the wontons, they’ll make them the most sought-after appetizer at your foodservice establishment.  Don’t lose this one!

Okay, let’s learn about artichokes:

(#1609) HOW TO PREPARE AN ARTICHOKE



There are two basic types of artichokes: globe and Jerusalem.  The typical one seen in the greengrocer’s showcase is the former, the latter being more of a specialty item.  Globe artichokes take a bit of experience to prepare properly and the first thing to do is to pick the ones that are perfect for you.  Never pick ones with spreading or discolored leaves as that signifies that they’re not young, tender, nor fresh.  It is important to use only the best product for the best results, especially if you plan on charging $7-10 (or more) at your foodservice establishment for a relatively cheap vegetable.

The first thing to do with your artichokes is to wash them and as with most vegetables and fruits, they should never be cleansed too far ahead.  Water refreshes all vegetables and also rids them of any accumulated particles of dirt but it also hastens decomposition and will cause them to spoil before their time.  The only way to prevent this is to (1) prepare them close to the moment of use or (2) have a large enough salad spinner (usually, only professionals have large enough ones) to spin the excess moisture out through the use of centrifugal force.  What you need to do is to have a sink-full of cold water and then holding them by the stem ends, dip them up and down quickly to remove excess dirt and grime.

Place them upside-down to dry on a baking rack or on a dish rack over the sink; then, trim the ends of right below the base with a sharp French knife or Chinese knife. Next, trim the top of the crown about one-quarter of an inch from the top to remove the hardened tip of the vegetable and discard.  Then, using kitchen shears or scissors trim each point on each leaf all the way around the vegetable and do this from top-to-bottom.  Then, snap or cut off the entire row of leaves around the BOTTOM of the artichokes and discard those, too, as they’re much too-hardened to eat.  Finally, have a bowl of acidulated water or lemon juice handy and dip the bases of each artichoke in it to prevent discoloration from spreading throughout the veggie.

The best method for cooking an artichoke is to STEAM them as this always creates the best artichokes and is also easier to monitor than boiling them which also leaves the problem of too much residual water—this is NEVER good. Restaurants have wall steamers or stand-alone steamers into which artichokes can be placed in perforated hotel pans and inserted inside and steamed to perfection within 20-45 minutes depending upon the power of the steamer.  A convection steamer will have them out even quicker.  If doing it at home, figure that it will take you the latter period of time rather than the former so plan ahead. 

Here’s the formula for steaming the best artichokes (to serve eight):

Yield:  x  / Mis-en-place: :




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
8
Medium
Artichokes (cleaned and trimmed)

2
Medium
Yellow onions, peeled and chopped

1
Bunch
Celery, chopped

4
Each
Carrots, chopped

.25
Cup
Lemon juice

2
Each
Bay leaves

1
Bunch
Parsley, chopped

.25
Cup
Vegetable oil

Drawn butter or Butter Sauce (Recipe #221)

Mayonnaise-based dips

Aiolis

Members of the Hollandaise Sauce family




Method:

2.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Place the ingredients beginning with the yellow onions and ending with the oil in the water in the steamer’s tank.  Fire up the steamer and get it going hot.  Place the prepared artichokes onto a perforated pan or a trivet and place inside and steam until tender but NOT falling apart.  Check after 15-20 minutes: a paring knife needs to be able to penetrate the center of the artichoke and be withdrawn with ease.  The outer leaves also need to feel tender and that they’ll be easily peeled away.  Always keep a close eye upon them and NEVER overcook them as the results will be disastrous!

3.      Cooked artichokes can be served straight out of the steamer (the preferred way) or chilled.  Allow one choke per person and always accompany with melted butter, mayonnaise-based dips, aiolis, even hollandaise sauces.  They can also be par-blanched in advance of a BIG banquet and then finished in the steamer prior to the beginning of service.

Here’s the Butter Sauce:

(#221) BUTTER SAUCE





1. About 1.5 cups/ 10 Minutes:



Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
#
Whole unsalted butter



Method:

1.      Melt whole butter over low heat.  Skim the foam as it melts.

2.      When fully melted, remove butter with a ladle and place in a bowl away from the heat.

3.      Take remaining whey and whip with a wire whisk over low heat.  Whip constantly until hot, about 3-4 minutes but do NOT bring to a boil.

4.      Remove the pot from the fire and gradually whisk in the drawn butter until an emulsified liquid has formed; keep warm at room temperature.  This mixture will remain in this state for several hours.  Use it to enhance cooked fish filets awaiting serving on dinner plates.  Besides providing flavor, it will also keep the fish nice and moist.

This is an important sauce to have on hand for use on seafood and shellfish.

Artichokes are no big deal if prepared by a diligent professional or home cook.  However, most artichoke lovers feel about them the same way wine connoisseurs feel about fine wines or fresh fish lovers feel about fresh fish: never try to slip a subpar item to them as they’ll let you hear about it for days and will badmouth your establishment for months, sometimes years to come.  Always remember this: serve nothing but the best as your professional reputation may suffer dramatically if you don’t. Here’s the Red Pepper and Cilantro Aioli:

(#407) ROASTED RED PEPPER AND CILANTRO AIOLI



Aiolis are like a spicy mayonnaise dip for use with hors d’ oeuvres and appetizers and this one is perfect for just that as well as sandwiches, soup garnishes, and even entrees so keep it handy.  It’s flavorful, can be made more or less spicy depending upon one’s preferences and will enliven any food with which you pair it!

Yield: 1.25 cups / Mis-en-place: about 20 minutes:



Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
Cup
Best Foods’ mayonnaise

1-1/3
Tablespoons
Lemon juice

1.5
Teaspoon
Chopped garlic

.25
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.125
Teaspoon
Black pepper

1
Tablespoon
Olive oil

1.5
Teaspoon
Freshly minced parsley

.75
Cup
Canned roasted red peppers, drained well

.25
Bunch
Fresh cilantro, washed and picked over



Method:

1.      Combine everything in your electric mixer using a whip attachment and blend together well. Refrigerate to below 45°F.  This will last for about a week in your refrigerator.

Aiolis have become very fashionable over the past two decades and this is an excellent one to have in your recipe books.  To serve the artichokes, heat ‘em up, place them onto a side plate and serve with both the aioli and the butter sauce in ramekins or monkey dishes.  That’s about all you can do with a choke so I’ll leave it up to you!

Alright, fellow culinarians, let’s make our final appetizer but first let’s learn about asparagus:

(#1610) HOW TO PREPARE ASPARAGUS



Asparagus is a tricky vegetable at times to prepare, one that novices tend to mess up.  In the “old days” or my grandparents, back in the 1960’s and prior, vegetable cookery was seen as secondary to whatever source of protein was being slapped on the table.  ALL vegetables were overcooked, lacked vitamin content, and generally looked horrible.  Nowadays, however, fresh vegetable cookery is important, veggies are seen as a full partner in whatever is being served, and they must be cooked in such a way that they look, taste, and smell spectacular and have 99% of their vitamin and mineral content.

As we know or should know asparagus is one of the MOST expensive vegetables on the market today as it’s a specialty veg that even though available all year-round, has its own seasons, more or less.  Many times, we see it in different thicknesses, the thinnest ones being the most sought-after while the thicker ones are soup material.  Generally, professionals save ALL parts of the asparagus including the wooden lower ends because when peeled, they make marvelous vegetable dishes of their own or are used as the base for the stock used in cream of asparagus soup. 

When you bring fresh asparagus home, trim off the lower ends by about ONE inch; you may either save or discard it.  Place the asparagus into a glass-like container or a thermos with water to about two inches.  Place it trimmed-base-side-DOWN in the water and allow it drink it in: in this way, it will keep the vegetable moist and ready for action rather than drying it out and allowing it go limp.  Always cover the top of the container with a moistened towel to keep it humidified. Fresh asparagus may be kept this way for 2-4 days, the former time for cooking being preferable to the latter.

Asparagus can be cooked in one of three ways: (1) the old-fashioned way in a pot of boiling, salted water; (2) in a vegetable steamer; or (3) in an asparagus steamer or in a Bain Marie or double-boiler.  The first way is okay, the second, better, and the third way, best.  As most of us may not have an asparagus steamer, the Number Two way is best followed by Number One.

Prior to cooking the asparagus, rinse it underneath cold running water and then select serving portions and tie each group with white string at both top and bottom: this allows for easier handling and will prevent the all-important tips from being broken off.  Have water in the pot, the double-boiler, or the asparagus steamer at a moderate boil and make sure you’ve salted it with kosher salt.  The salt is what keeps a vegetable’s color the same as in its raw form.  Also, have a large pot or bowl full of ice water as cooked vegetables must be immediately chilled to also maintain their raw color.

Yield:  8 servings  / Mis-en-place: 1-2 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2-3
#
Fresh asparagus, cleaned and trimmed

Boiling water

2
Teaspoons
Kosher salt

Ice water




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Have the salted water ready and going and when you place the asparagus within it, cover it up and let it go.  The thinner the asparagus, the quicker the cooking time so figure 60 seconds or less.  If it’s extremely thin, allow no more than 20-30 seconds.  As soon as it’s al dente-tender, REMOVE it and plunge immediately into ICE WATER.  This retards any further cooking as well as captures the color like a photograph captures an image.

2.      As soon as it’s chilled, remove it and allow it to dry.  To serve, heat it up in the microwave and then serve as your recipe directs you to do.

Asparagus is a classy vegetable and one that figures in many different dishes ranging from vegetable dishes to Auguste Escoffier entrees such as Veal Oskar, Veau ala Cliff, and a wide range of others.  It is important to know how to fix it if one wants to be a great chef and this primer will help you do that.

So, prepare your asparagus as directed and then serve it with the following sauce:

(#311 A) LEMON BUERRE BLANC





Yield: about 1.5 cups  / Mis-en-place: 20-25 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
Cup
Chablis

.5
Teaspoon
Lemon zest

1.5
Teaspoons
Lemon juice

1
Tablespoon
Apple cider vinegar

.25
Teaspoon
Black pepper

1.5
Teaspoons
Softened butter

1.5
Tablespoons
All-purpose flour

.25
Cup
Heavy cream

1
Pinch
Kosher salt




Method:

1. In a heavy bottom sauce pan, reduce the first 5 ingreds by half. Combine butter and flour to form a roux and blend it in. Add the cream and bring the mixture to a full boil. Then, whisk in soft butter gradually until you have a delicious butter sauce. Keep warm at 140°F.

This is an important sauce to know how to make as you will use it many times in the course of your career.

To serve the asparagus, put it onto a decorative plate and top it with Lemon Buerre Blanc.  Dust it with parsley flakes and a sprinkle or two of paprika.  Then, it’s time to serve to your hungry guests!

--------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

I do hope you’ve enjoyed our appetizers today; all three of them are very classy and easy enough to make.  Fathers like eating tasty vegetables with delicious sauces and these are the two best veggie appetizers of which I’m aware.  The wontons are a classic, they’re found across the country but in Hawaii, they’re special and there’s nothing better than piping hot wontons fresh out of the fryer being dipped in cold tempura dipping sauce—so ono!  We love celebrating the holidays here in the Hawaiian Islands and it no matter what the day is, whenever people get together, they bring all sorts of different foods and the kau-kau is great.  The regular folks call it “da grinds” which means “good food” but for the purposes of being readily accessible to the entire readership, I try to keep the Hawaiian slang to a minimum.  But you get the idea: we speak differently over here and when people first come to visit or to live here, they get the idea that they’re living in a foreign country which they’re not; it just seems like it.  Nonetheless, by the time they leave for their homes wherever they might be, they’re speaking the language like a pro!                           

Anyhow, let us close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by STEPPENWOLF and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com—we want to make some money here so help us out by buying something!  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

Thank you!

Itzi Nakamura

Itzi Nakamura

Certified Executive Chef—American Culinary Federation, Inc.  

This is me back in the 1980's when I was the Executive Chef at a fine-dining restaurant out in Lahaina, HI, on the beautiful island of Maui.  I began my culinary career in the late 1960’s while living on my home island of Oahu and after spending some time in California during the 1990’s, I returned to my native Hawaii and am currently running a gourmet restaurant in Kihei, HI.  My experience has been in fine-dining but I’ve also spent time running a hospital kitchen as both a dietician and as a Cook IV.
Chef Itzi Nakamura writes from Kihei, HI.
---30---

The END Commentary for Tuesday, June 05, 2012 by Chef Itzi Nakamura

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef Itzi Nakamura



Recipe created by Chef Itzi Nakamura on March 20, 1987 in Honolulu, HI.

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The Chef’s Culinary Nightmare: the end is indeed coming soon so beware of  December 21, 2012!

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