Popular Posts

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

“Soup Seminar, Pt. XXIX: Philadelphia Pepper Pot Soup—Hot and Spicy Food Lovers, this Soup is for you!” by Chef James “Jimmy” Hall



Today, we continue offering albums by one of the all-time greatest rock bands to have come out of Los Angeles in the 1960’s—SPIRIT! Please go to Amazon.com and buy their THIRD album, “Clear,” which was and still is awesome!  Released on ODE Records in 1969, “Clear” was an exceptional album that was leading to the band’s ultimate success, “The Twelve Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus” which will be advertised tomorrow.  Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.  



COUNTDOWN TO THE END OF THE MAYAN CALENDAR…


Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 187 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!



STINKBUG 2012





Chef James “Jimmy” Hall

END Commentary 06-20-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 1,787.



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Wednesday, June 20, 2012 by Chef James “Jimmy” Hall

SOUP SEMINAR, PT XXIX—PHILADELPHIA PEPPER POT SOUP

 Soup Seminar, Pt. XXIX: Philadelphia Pepper Pot Soup—Hot and Spicy Food Lovers, this Soup is for you!” by Chef James “Jimmy” Hall



Bakersfield, CA, 06-20-2012 W: Our soup for today is one that might not be familiar to a great many of you so that makes it somewhat exciting for all of us—Philadelphia Pepper Pot Soup! This is a soup popular on the East Coast of the United States primarily in Pennsylvania and in the New England states.  I’m sure using my culinary knowledge that tripe found its way to the country with the original settlers and in that time period and somewhat after as well as before, variety meats—kidneys, liver, brains, and tripe—were popular because NO meat was wasted and no part of said meat was not utilized.  In those days, eating tripe was commonplace as it is now in the Latino countries and their immigrants.  Their form of the soup is called “Menudo” and features not only tripe but also white hominy, which is a staple in Latin America.  The soup is absolutely delicious and one that every lover of hot and spicy foods should fall in love with.  The important thing is that the tripe is prepared perfectly which is what both tenderizes it AND takes away the off-taste associated with variety meats.  Let’s face it: any organ meat generally has a definitive taste to it, which many people simply don’t care for.  Still, some things—like—Haggis—are beloved by certain groups of people and are seen as each and everyone’s “soul foods.”  Our motto at the Elemental News of the Day “is to each their own” which generally works for everyone!

Tripe can generally be found at most grocery stores and always look for the freshest there is in the showcase.  You want tripe that is pure white, without any discoloring, yellow spots, excess fluid, and an odor.  Many times, one can visit a Mexican meat market and find better quality tripe there than in normal grocery stores.  Like most soups, the better the products, the better the ultimate product.  That is what we aspire for each and every time we strap on our aprons: perfection.  Let’s do it:

(#564) PHILADELPHIA PEPPER POT SOUP I



This was one of the earliest soups I learned to make in the 1970s and while not a favorite of; mine was a favorite of others.  Tripe is an acquired taste and for some, it’s a way of life, too.  The Hispanic World enjoys tripe, as do many European nations.  Anyhow, if you love spicy foods, this is somewhat different from the standard fare you may be used to eating so give it a shot!

Yield:  about 3.5 quarts / Mis-en-place: 1.5-2 hours:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1.5
#
Honeycomb tripe, cut into 0.5” squares

3
Quarts
Boiling water

2
Tablespoons
Whole pickling spice

1
Each
Lemon, quartered

3
Quarts
Veal or chicken stock

1
Each
Bouquet Garni (Recipe #208)

.75
#
Peeled and diced white rose potatoes
Blanched
2
Quarts
Water

1.5
Quarts
Reserved chicken or veal broth

.75
Cup
Reserved potato liquid

3
Cups
Tomato juice

3
Cups
Diced yellow onions

3
Cups
Diced celery

1.5
Cups
Diced green bell peppers (seeded, stemmed, and de-ribbed)

1
Each
Bay leaf

.75
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

3/8
Teaspoon
Black pepper

.0125
Teaspoon
White pepper

.25
Teaspoon
Cayenne pepper

.25
Teaspoon
Tabasco sauce

.75
Teaspoon
Whole marjoram

3/8
Teaspoon
Whole oregano

.75
Teaspoon
Minced garlic

1.5
Teaspoons
Freshly minced parsley
Rinsed



Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Make the Bouquet Garni first:

(#208) STANDARD BOUQUET GARNI





Yield:  for one gallon  / Mis-en-place: 5 minutes:



Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
Stalk
Celery

3
Each
Carrots

1
Each
Onion

2
Each
Leeks

1
Piece
Bay leaf

1
Sprig
Fresh thyme

.5
Piece
parsnips




Method:

2.      Mis-en-place: Wash and clean all vegetables. Halve the vegetables and combine with the herbs in a large piece of cheesecloth. Then, tie it all up and this is what you’ll use when you make your stocks. It’s easy to put it in and easy to take it out. This is the basic of basics.

     Note: parsnips are not always included so you have to consider the final flavor you’re after. Some stocks do not benefit from their flavor so always keep that in mind. Some bouquet garnis do not utilize carrots either but I always have. Something else that adds as well is garlic cloves and whole white pepper corns.


This is the classic addition to braising meats, poultry, and even seafood.  It’s an important item to have in one’s repertoire. Now, we will proceed with the soup:

3.      The tripe is the most important part of the soup and its preparation must be adhered to for it not to have an unpleasant taste attached to it.  Those who’ve never eaten tripe are sometimes put off by its odd taste so work hard at making palatable for the majority of the people:

4.      Place the first measure of water on the stove and bring to a boil.  Add to it the whole pickling spice and the lemon and then the cut tripe.  Bring to a boil and once it’s reached it, drop the heat to low and cover the pot with a lid.  Allow it to cook for at least an hour until it is extremely tender and the unpleasant flavor has disappeared—long slow cooking will accomplish this.

5.      Meanwhile, place the chicken or veal stock on the stove and add the Bouquet Garni to it and bring it to a boil; once there, drop the flame and reduce it to 1.5 quarts.  Once there, drop the heat to low and keep it warm.

6.      Heat the two quarts of water on the stove and when boiling, add the diced potatoes and cook them for 30-45 minutes over a medium flame.  Cook just until al dente-tender and then remove them but don’t discard the water.  Plunge the potatoes into a bowl of ice water and keep there until chilled.  Then, drain the water—tossing it out—and dry the spuds.

7.      Take the potato water, the chicken/veal stock, and the tomato juice and combine them together in a large saucepot on the stove.  Place over a medium-high flame.  Combine all of the spices in a bowl, take some of the combined liquid, and blend it into a loose paste.  Whisk this paste into the stock and whisk well to disperse it without lumps throughout the stock.  Add the onions, celery, and peppers and reduce by three cups over a moderate flame.

8.      As the soup reduces to the approximate amount, keep checking the flavor and see if it’s hot enough, adjusting it if necessary.   Add the tripe to the soup and allow it to continue tenderizing but take care NEVER to boil the soup, as this will toughen up the meat.   Finally, when the soup is at the proper amount, add the potatoes and allow them to heat up; then, the soup is ready to serve!

9.      Always serve Pepper Pot Soup in a tureen or in individual bowls.  This is a specialty soup from the Eastern United States but is somewhat similar to Mexican Menudo so will be a treat for those who like spicy foods.  Always be sure to transfer leftovers to a shallow baking dish and cool with the aid of a cooling rack.  Once below 45°F, relocate the soup to a sanitized airtight container and cover with a tight-fitting lid.  Label, date, and refrigerate.

10. Pepper Pot will maintain freshness for about 2-3 days and should always be reheated to 165°F or higher.

Philadelphia Pepper Pot Soup is one of those classics that are much loved in certain areas of the country while being unknown in others.  If you enjoy spicy foods and love tripe, this is an excellent soup to make.  Always be sure to use honeycomb tripe as it’s the best there is and should not be difficult to find.

--------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this, as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will become dedicated followers of the END.  Currently of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us, leave comments, and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

I’m pleased we made this soup today as it’s one not a lot of people see or know about today except for certain areas on the East Coast.  Tripe, likewise, is one of those under-utilized variety meats that are more ethnic than they are commonplace.  Still, doing different things is what it is all about here at the Elemental News of the Day and I am so glad that we can do it together.  Next time you’re in the mood for something powerful, hot, spicy, and mind-blowing, go to the grocery store, buy some tripe, and make this awesome soup—you won’t regret it!                                      

Anyhow, let us close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by SPIRIT and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com—we want to make some money here so help us out by buying something!  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

Thank you!

Jimmy Hall

James Hall

Cook III, CWC, ACF, CA273 Santa Barbara ACF chapter and HI033 Maui Chef’s and Cook’s Association

______________________________________________________________________
This is me as a chef during the 1980's when we took a group photograph for a Chefs de Cuisine yearbook. At the time, I was working at a hotel in Bakersfield, CA, down on Union Avenue. It was still somewhat nice and the area was still the original "restaurant row" of the city. I am now in my sixties and am working over in Santa Barbara, CA, as a food and beverage director for a country club.

Chef James “Jimmy” Hall writes from Santa Barbara, CA.

---30---

The END Commentary for Wednesday, June 20, 2012 by Chef James “Jimmy” Hall

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

The one-and-only Chef James “Jimmy” Hall writes this original essay.



Recipe created by Chef James “Jimmy” Hall on October 26, 1997 in Bakersfield, CA.

KEEP READING THE ELEMENTARY NEWS OF THE DAY FOR THE BEST OF CULINARY POLITICS!

http://elementalnewsoftheday.blogspot.com/

read the elemental news of the day for the best news, political commentary, sports, foodservice, hotel and restaurant business, the end times, the end of days, the apocalypse, armageddon, and whatever else happens to pop up!

  THIS WEEK:
♂TODAY: CHEF JAMES “JIMMY” HALL
NEXT WEEK: CHEF VLADIMIR GDANSK


STINKBUG AT THE COUNTDOWN TO THE END DAYS


This is #947 a 16” x 20" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Soft Sunset." It is among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world for both the beauty and timelessness of her artworks. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!



Beverly Carrick: the World’s Greatest Artist!
Deserts




















CAVEAT:

NOTE: EVERYONE WHO WRITES FOR THE ELEMENTAL NEWS OF THE DAY DOES SO UNDER AN ALIAS DUE TO FREQUENT OPINIONS THAT MIGHT NOT ALWAYS BE ACCEPTABLE AT THEIR PLACES OF EMPLOYMENT. THANK YOU, Moses Scharbug III.





Magnolia Hilltop Brewers and What's Cookin' Productions Trademark of Quality and Symbol of Integrity. Copyright 06-12-2012, all rights reserved. No unauthorized reproductions of any of this material are permissible unless granted by written permission. Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.

President: Garfield H. Johnson

Executive Vice President: Alvin T. Woliztnikistein

Publisher: B. Carrick

Assistant Publisher: Roland Carl Davis

Chief Editor: Stinkbug.

Assistant Editor: Moses Scharbug III

Mail Room: Jane Lee Tarzana (direct all mail here).

Proofreader: Amos Mosby Caruthers.

Amazon.com Liaison: Gilbert R.

Beer: Smokehouse.































MAGNOLIA HILLTOP BREWERS PRODUCTIONS

Tags:

Jimmy Hall, The Soup-Master, Gourmet Cooking, SPIRIT, The Prepmaster, Soups, Stocks, Gourmet Soups, The Pantry Chef, Stock Soups, Tripe, Mexican Cuisine, Hot and Spicy Foods,




Trademark of Quality c/o the Elemental News of the Day and Magnolia Hilltop Brewers Productions 2012 of Bakersfield, California, the United States of America.



NOTE—WE SUPPORT JAZ MCKAY AND MR. PUCK OF KNZR 1560 A.M. RADIO IN BAKERSFIELD, CA, BECOMING A SYNDICATED, NATIONWIDE RADIO SHOW! THE MAN IS ONE OF THE ALL-TIME GREATS AND DESERVES TO BE RECOGNIZED FOR HIS CONTRIBUTIONS TO TALK RADIO, THE CONSERVATIVE CAUSE, AND PLAIN COMMON SENSE! THANK YOU!







Advertisements:








































































CHEF JAMES “JIMMY” HALL
MADE IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA! WE SUPPORT THE MILITARY OF THE UNITED STATES AND THAT OF ITS ALLIES AROUND THE GLOBE!



Thank you for joining me today at the New Elemental News of the Day, I appreciate your company and hope that you bring your friends, family, neighbors, coworkers, and relatives the next time you visit!








BUY “CLEAR” BY SPIRIT ATAMAZON.COM NOW!




The Chef’s Culinary Nightmare: the end is indeed coming soon so beware of BOTH November 06 AND December 21, 2012!

No comments:

Post a Comment

Please leave comments! Thanks! The American Institute of Culinary Politics-Elemental News of the Day!