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Saturday, June 2, 2012

“Hawaiian and Polynesian Recipes, Pt. XXIII: Classic Maui Duck—it’s NOT Seafood but it’s the Crème de la Crème of what Hawaii has to offer” by Chef Cheryl La Tigre



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Chef Cheryl La Tigre

END Commentary 06-03-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,395.



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Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Sunday, June 03, 2012 by Chef Cheryl La Tigre

HAWAIIAN AND POLYNESIAN RECIPES, PT. XXIII

 Hawaiian and Polynesian Recipes, Pt. XXIII: Classic Maui Duck—it’s NOT Seafood but it’s the Crème de la Crème of what Hawaii has to offer” by Chef Cheryl La Tigre



Bakersfield, CA, 06-03-2012 Su: Aloha, aloha, aloha!  This is my final day for this go-round and then it’s off to enjoy the loveliness of my beautiful home in the Pearl City area of Honolulu.  I love it here it in the Islands that it’s difficult to ever leave the place to go anywhere else, I so love the ambience of this area, it’s something that everyone must experience at least once in their lifetimes!  

We will close out our week with something OTHER than seafood today: Classic Maui Duck! Ducks are cherished creatures in the Orient; they’re seen as wise, knowledgeable creatures and the best part is that they taste magnificent prepared in a wide variety of ways! What could be better than that? Anyhow, I love Maui Duck; it’s sort of an old-time, signature presentation of one of my grandmother’s uncle’s aunt.  I know, it’s sort of convoluted but here in the Islands, genealogy is very important and long lines of ancestors are revered for centuries.  It’s important to know everyone of one’s ancestors but sometimes, it’s difficult knowing everyone in the family NOW; I mean, there are so many aunts, uncles, cousins, and nephews that at times, I don’t recognize everyone whenever we have a massive family get-together, it’s sort of like being at the United Nations with representatives from every culture, every nation at the dinner table.  But you have to love it; it’s a beautiful thing having someone from every place on earth because the culinary influences are excitingly diverse!

The one thing you need to purchase is the mango chutney used in the recipe OR you can make it yourself.  Geeta’s is a very good brand, flavorful, spicy, brings out the sweat on one’s forehead in a nice way.  It’s what adds the internationalism to our recipe and is found in specialty stores over the world.  Anyhow, let’s get it going:

(#1153) MAUI DUCK



Duck is a very popular item in Asian societies and in Hawaii, it’s found everywhere in a wide variety of ways.  This is the traditional Maui Duck, it’s tasty, has a wide range of culinary influences incorporated in it, and is a dish that most professional cooks and chefs take home to wherever they visited from.  I have always enjoyed eating duck and now that it’s more widely available farm-raised, it’s lost that gaminess which many in the “old days” used to criticize.  Give this one a try: you’ll fall in love with it!

Yield:  4 servings  / Mis-en-place: 1.75-2.5 hours+:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
3#
Whole duckling

1
Each
Lemon, halved

Kosher Salt and Pepper (Recipe #1324)

1
Cup
Sesame oil

The Stuffing:
.25
Cup
Reserved duck drippings

1
#
Julienned salt pork

1.5
Cups
Fine-diced celery

1.5
Cups
Fine-diced yellow onions

.25
Cup
Sliced waterchestnuts

1
Teaspoon
Minced fresh ginger

1
Teaspoon
Minced fresh garlic

1.5
Teaspoons
Kosher salt

.25
Teaspoon
Black pepper

.25
Teaspoon
Whole thyme

1
Each
Bay leaf

.125
Cup
Brown sugar

3-4
Cups
Toasted bread cubes (for dressing)

.125
Cup
Rice wine vinegar

.25
Cup
Shoyu

1-2
Cups
Duck broth (made from necks, innards, etc.)

.125
Cup
Geeta’s mango chutney

.25
Cup
Rice flour

Tamarind-Mango Sauce (see below):
3-4
Cups
Tamarind-Mango Sauce (Recipe #369)

The Finish:
4
Each
Ti leaves

.5
Cup
Slivered scallions

.25
Cup
Julienned red bell pepper strips

3-4
Cups
Stir-fried vegetables of choice

3-4
Cups
Steamed Hinode rice

4
Each
Orange moons

4
Each
Parsley sprigs
Rinsed
.125
Cup
Freshly minced parsley
Rinsed



Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Prepare the Kosher Salt and Pepper recipe first:

(#1324) KOSHER SALT AND PEPPER SEASONING





1. Yield: One cup of seasoning:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
Cup
Kosher salt

1.5
Tablespoon
Coarse black pepper

.5
Teaspoon
Hungarian paprika

.5
Teaspoon
Dry parsley flakes




Method:

2.      Combine together and store in an airtight container.

This is a good basic, salt-and-pepper seasoning that you will find many uses for.

3.      Next, rinse the duck out and rub it inside and out with a couple of lemon halves.  Then, sprinkle it heavily with the Kosher Salt and Pepper Seasoning and then leave it out at room temperature—covered of course!—for an hour.  Preheat your standard oven to 400°F or your convection oven—fan “on”—to 350°F.  Prepare the following sauce:

(#369) TAMARIND-MANGO SAUCE

Tamarind has long been used in Asian cookery but is relatively new to the United States, within the past decade, decade-and-a-half or so.  You could always find it in Asian and Central Asian grocery stores but now, you can find tamarind blocks most anywhere.  A great, unique flavor, it will add a great deal of zest to your cooking.

Yield:  about 1 quart  / Mis-en-place: 60+ minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
#
Tamarind (block or paste form)

1
Large
Tomato, chopped

1
Large
Yellow onion, chopped

3
Cloves
Garlic, minced

3
Cups
Orange juice

8
Ounces
Brown sugar

2
Each
Mangos, peeled and diced fine

2
Each
Red bell pepper, seeded, stemmed, de-ribbed, diced ¼”

Additional water or fruit juice

Cornstarch or clear gel slurry


Method:

4.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Combine all of the ingredients in a large saucepot and cover with a lid.  Place over a medium flame and bring it to a boil; then, drop the heat to dead-low and let it cook over low flame for 45-50 minutes.  Check occasionally during this period to make sure that it doesn’t run out of water; add more if necessary.

5.      Normally, this sort of sauce should be reduced to the consistency of a sauce that will be squirted out of a PLASTIC SQUEEZE BOTTLE and used for adding “accents” to different oriental dishes as nowadays—we do all sorts of garnishing sauces to add beauty and flavor to our finished dishes.  Stir the pulp around until it’s very fluid; add water if necessary. 

6.      Force it through a fine-meshed sieve or strainer or place into a blender and blend well and THEN force through the sieve into another saucepot.  Return to the stove over medium-high flame and tighten it moderately with cornstarch/clear gel slurry. Tighten it just enough to make it like PANCAKE syrup as this is sort of what it’s supposed to be—a syrup.

7.      When it’s thickened, allow it to simmer for another 10-15 minutes and then pour it into a shallow pan and allow it to cool.  Place a sheet of wax paper sprayed with PAM or with some such other food release spray over it—sprayed-side-DOWN—so that it doesn’t obtain an unpleasant skin.  Then, insert it into the refrigerator and chill it for several hours.

8.      When you check it next, check the consistency: if too thick, add a bit of pineapple, apricot, or mango juice to it to thin it to the proper consistency.  Transfer it to a squeeze bottle or heat it up and use it for a sauce to serve with duck, chicken, or fish.  Never keep it for more than 3-4 days at most; after that, toss it out and start fresh.

This is a tasty oriental sauce that adds some spice and zing to whatever it’s attached to or makes a nice garnishing sauce for Asian dishes, appetizers, or hors d’oeuvres.  Now, proceed to the next part of the recipe:

9.      Place the duck on a drip-roasting pan after spraying the grate and the bottom of the pan with PAM or with some such other food release spray.  Place the duck inside the oven and roast it at the higher temperature for about 20 minutes.  Check it during this time and if begins to brown too much, tent it with foil; when time’s up, lower the heat by 50°F and continue roasting the bird.  Remove some of the drippings as they gather from the bottom pan.

10. Add the reserved drippings to a heavy-bottomed saucepot and place it over medium flame.  Spray it with PAM and heat it up and when hot, add the vegetables, waterchestnuts, garlic, ginger, salt, black pepper, thyme, and bay leaf.  Sauté the veggies until tender and somewhat translucent and then pull them from the stove.

11. Add the bread cubes, brown sugar, Shoyu, and rice wine vinegar and toss well.  Begin pouring in the HOT duck stock until a moist, fragrant dressing has been formed.  Spray a baking dish with PAM and then press the stuffing into it.  Tighten it, if necessary, with rice flour. Cover it with a piece of wax paper sprayed with PAM—sprayed-side-DOWN—upon the dressing and insert it into your oven on the middle or lower oven rack.  Bake it along with the duck. 

12. As the duck continues to cook, baste it with SESAME OIL until it runs out and then continue to baste it with the drippings that continue to accumulate in the bottom of the drip pan.  Baste it until it begins to get crispy brown and continue basting it.  After 1-1.25 hours, begin checking the temperature of the bird: like ALL poultry, it must read 165°F so begin checking the thighs first. Don’t let it dry out so make sure the breasts are covered with foil if they begin browning too much.

13. When the bird reads 165°F on a quick-temp thermometer, bring it out and set it atop a cooling rack to breathe and to air out a bit.  Keep it warm but it will seal itself and its juices within it if you don’t poke and prod it too much.  Have the sauce on hand in the top of a double-boiler or Bain Marie over simmering but NOT boiling water.  Bake the stuffing until it, too, reads 165°F.

14. When all is done prepare to serve.  Bring the duck to the cutting board and with a sharp scimitar, boning knife, or even a French knife, separate it into serving portions: two thighs, two drums, two wings, and two breasts.  Give each diner TWO pieces: serve them atop a mound of stuffing atop a ti leaf; ladle sauce over all. Place the vegetables at 10 o’clock and the steamed Hinode rice at 2 o’clock.  Place an orange moon with a parsley sprig shoved through its center in the center of the plate. Sprinkle slivered scallions and julienned red bell peppers over everything followed by parsley flakes; then, it’s time to serve your Maui duck!

15. If there are any leftovers, they must be cooled to below 45°F as quickly as possible and then refrigerated or frozen after being plastic-wrapped and then zipped up tight in Zip-Loc freezer bags.  Always reheat leftovers—including stuffing!—to 165°F or higher prior to serving.  Store sauce in sealed airtight SANITIZED containers in the fridge and heat to the same reheat temperature unless used COLD. Never keep for longer than 1-2 days in the refrigerator or in the freezer for longer than 7-10 days.

This is a classic dish much-loved by those who live in Hawaii.  It smacks of Portuguese-origins married to Asian.  A lovely presentation, it’s a great way to use duck in a way that’s not normally seen on the Mainland.

--------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

This is it for me this time around, my friends! I do hope my sophomore effort eclipsed my freshman debut! Anyhow, I look forward to being gone for the next 5-6 months and also in welcoming Itzi Nakamura to the “Stinkbug Chair” theoretically out in the home base of Oildale, CA, although neither she nor I have ever technically been there.  But that’s the beauty of being able to communicate with one another online around the nation, the continent, and the world and that’s precisely what we do! You have to love that, my friends!  Anyhow, I am so glad to have been here with all of you, please write me and let me know how well I’ve done and please become followers, please send your friends, family, neighbors, whoever to become Elementalized here at the END! We want you! Besides, we’ll soon be under 200 days in our countdown to the end of the Mayan Calendar and NO one wants to miss that!                                

Anyhow, let us close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by STEPPENWOLF and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com—we want to make some money here so help us out by buying something!  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

Thanks, my friends!

Cheryl La Tigre

Cheryl La Tigre
CEC, ACF, Chefs de Cuisine Association of Honolulu, Hawaii

This is me back in the 1980’s when I was working at a hotel in Honolulu, HI, on Waikiki Beach.  I began my career in the early 1970’s when I apprenticed to cook under one of the masters on the Big Island where I was born.  I moved to Oahu in the early 1980’s after having worked in both Kona and Hilo, HI, and have been there for most of my professional career.  I have also worked on Maui for a few years (1995-1998) and have also been on Kauai (2001-2003) before returning to Honolulu.  My goal is to prepare the next generation of chefs for the future and also to help the underprivileged in their struggle to attain careers in the foodservice industry.

---30---

The END Commentary for Sunday, June 03, 2012 by Chef Cheryl La Tigre

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This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef Cheryl La Tigre



Recipe created by Chef Cheryl La Tigre on June 20, 1985 in Honolulu, HI.

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