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Sunday, June 10, 2012

“Famous Restaurant Recipes, Pt. XLVIII: Seared Tenderloin of Beef topped with Portobello Mushroom Ragu and served with Potato Pancakes and Grilled Asparagus—Country Club Cuisine at its ultimate Best” by Chef Elvin C. McCardle



Today, we continue offering albums by STEPPENWOLF!   Their EIGHTEENTH album—“Rock & Roll Rebels”—was released in 1987 and was another awesome hard-rocking album by the band that gave us the term, “HEAVY METAL.”  This is a great album and one you definitely need to go to Amazon.com and purchase NOW!  Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.  




COUNTDOWN TO THE END OF THE MAYAN CALENDAR…


Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 195 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!



STINKBUG 2012



FATHER’S DAY 2012 WEEK!



Chef Elvin C. McCardle

END Commentary 06-11-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 3,505.



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CULINARY POLITICS



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Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Monday, June 11, 2012 by Chef Elvin C. McCardle

FAMOUS RESTAURANT RECIPES, PT. XLVIII

 Famous Restaurant Recipes, Pt. XLVIII: Seared Tenderloin of Beef topped with Portobello Mushroom Ragu and served with Potato Pancakes and Grilled Asparagus—Country Club Cuisine at its ultimate Best” by Chef Elvin C. McCardle



Bakersfield, CA, 06-11-2012 M: Happy Monday morning, Elemental News of the Day readers, I’m happy to be here today.   I am also quite pleased to follow our newest author, Itzi Nakamura, a wonderful woman—and beautiful, too!—and am excited by her having done the Father’s Day Menu 2012 for your enjoyment.  This is Father’s Day Week, itself, of course and we will count down the days until we can wish Dad a happy holiday!  We will be doing some gourmet entrees this week, commencing with our Famous Restaurant Recipes category which hasn’t been done in several months.  It will also be my first time doing it which makes me extremely proud!  This is sort of the crème de la crème of the blog, doing the famous restaurant recipes—both old and new—as it allows each chef to either prepare the dish in its original form or to offer a new interpretation of the dish for everyone to see.  In addition to that, we can offer a totally new, original dish or one we’ve seen done elsewhere and then have reconfigured.  No matter whatever it is we’re doing, it’s exciting for you because it allows you to sit back and observe, to learn at the feet of the professors and to then take it either to your homes or to your places of employment or your own personal restaurants if you’re the owner. 

Our dish today is sort of a reinterpretation of the famed chateaubriand that used to be on the menus of every fine-dining establishment from one end of the country to the other and was often the most expensive dish on the menu along with the crown rack of veal and the lamb racks for two.  All of these dishes involved tableside-finishing either by the maitre d’ or the head chef who would come out and finish it off tableside.  What we’re doing today is preparing a succulent filet mignon for four people, fanning it out medium-rare atop two delicious potato pancakes and then dousing it with a flavorful balsamic-laced Portobello mushroom ragu with savory grilled asparagus alongside.  This is a masterful presentation that requires one to be a specialist at the broiler position as the meat must be cooked right on the mark.  It also involves help from either the sauté chef or the pantry man to provide the finishing touches.  All in all, it’s a masterful dish and will go down in cooking annals as one of the all-time modern classics! Let’s begin:

(#1621) SEARED TENDERLOIN OF BEEF (WITH PORTOBELLO MUSHROOM RAGU AND GRILLED ASPARAGUS)



This is country club cooking at its best, delicious filet mignons, definitely USDA Prime or Choice cut or even better, Black Angus beef cooked to a tantalizing medium-rare, served with tasty potato pancakes, grilled asparagus and a very flavorful ragu.  This one was a hit at the time we were doing it and is still a fantastic dish, just take your time and pay close attention to each and every step and then coordinate them in harmony for a spectacular finish!

Yield:  4 servings / Mis-en-place: 1 hour / Cooking Time: 5-6 minutes (meat). 




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
4
10-ounce
USDA Prime or Choice filet mignons

Stinkbug Seasoning (Recipe #226)

Vegetable oil

8
Each
Potato Pancakes (Recipe #824)

3-4
Cups
Balsamic-Portobello Mushroom Ragu (Recipe #1620)
1.5
#
Fresh asparagus (see notes)

.125
Cup
Freshly minced parsley flakes
Rinsed
4
Each
Parsley sprigs
Rinsed
1-2
Cups
Broken Glass Garnish (Recipe #1305)



Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Here’s the Stinkbug Seasoning:

(#226) STINKBUG’S SEASONING




1. Yield: One cup of seasoning:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
Cup
Kosher salt

1
Tablespoon
Black pepper

1
Tablespoon
Granulated garlic

1.5
Teaspoon
Granulated onion

.5
Teaspoon
Hungarian paprika

1
Teaspoon
Summer savory

1
Teaspoon
Dry parsley flakes



Method:

2.      Combine all ingredients together in the bowl of an electric mixer and mix together well. Store in an airtight, DRY container.

This is a wonderful multi-purpose seasoning that can be used with most foods. Here’s the Potato Pancake recipe:

(#824) POTATO PANCAKES

Potato Pancakes: easy to make and a joy to eat!

Yield:  7-8 pancakes  / Mis-en-place: 25 minutes:



Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
10
Medium
Russets, steamed and grated

2
Cups
Finely-minced yellow onions

.125
Cup
Melted butter

5
Each
Large AAA eggs, beaten and strained

1
Tablespoon
Kosher salt

1.5
Teaspoons
Black pepper

.5
Teaspoon
Minced garlic

1
Cup
Finely-minced scallions

1
Cup
Sour cream

2.5
Cups
All-purpose flour

Vegetable oil




Method:

3.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Have a griddle or flattop heated to 375°F.  Or, if you need to use skillets, oil and spray them with food release and have ready over low heat.

4.      Place a large skillet over medium flame and spray it with PAM or with some such other food release spray.  When it’s fairly warm, add the melted butter and heat it up.  When it’s close to a sizzle, add the minced onions and sauté until tender and somewhat translucent; set aside.

5.      On the electric mixer equipped with a whip attachment, beat the eggs until light and foamy.  Then, add the seasonings, scallions, and sour cream, blending well.  Add the potatoes, onions, and the flour and blend well, rotating the paddle attachment on low speed.  When you have a somewhat loose but medium-stiff batter, pull it off of the mixer.  Refrigerate it for 10-15 minutes; then, bring it out.

6.      Spray the griddle or flattop with PAM and then oil it.  Leave enough oil on it so that the pancakes will have a bit of a lubricant as they cook.  Ladle out half-cup portions and allow them to cook on one side until firmed-up and golden-brown around the edges; then, flip them over and cook on the other side for 2-3 minutes.

7.      As the cakes come off the griddle, check them for doneness by opening up a couple with a paring knife to see if it’s cooked through-and-through: they should be fairly dry without any WET spots; it’s important to cook them thoroughly because of the raw eggs. If so, they’re done and ready to go.

8.      Usually, there aren’t any leftovers but if there are and you feel they’re worthwhile to save, wrap them in plastic wrap when completely cooled and freeze for use at a later time.  Never leave out at room temperature for any longer than is necessary.

Potato pancakes are a wonderful way to utilize leftover potatoes, baked potatoes, or scraps of potatoes from other preparations. Here’s the recipe for the Portobello Mushroom Ragu:

(#1620) PORTOBELLO MUSHROOM RAGU



Yield:  about 3-4 cups  / Mis-en-place: 35-45 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
.25
Cup
Olive oil

.75
Cup
Minced red onions

.75
Cup
Minced yellow onions

2
Teaspoons
Minced garlic

24
Ounces
Portobello mushroom caps, cleaned and trimmed; sliced
1
Teaspoon
Whole thyme

.5
Teaspoon
Whole oregano

.5
Teaspoon
Whole sweet basil

.5
Cup
Gallo Ruby Port

.25
Cup
Balsamic vinegar

1
Quart
Canned or freshly-cooked diced tomatoes*

2+
Teaspoons
Kosher Salt and Pepper (Recipe #1324)

.125
Cup
Freshly minced parsley flakes
Rinsed
.125
Cup
Freshly minced chervil




Method:

9.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Here’s the recipe for the Kosher Salt and Pepper:

(#1324) KOSHER SALT AND PEPPER SEASONING



1. Yield: One cup of seasoning:



Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
Cup
Kosher salt

1.5
Tablespoon
Coarse black pepper

.5
Teaspoon
Hungarian paprika

.5
Teaspoon
Dry parsley flakes




Method:

10. Combine together and store in an airtight container.

This is a good basic, salt-and-pepper seasoning that you will find many uses for.

11. *If you wish to use fresh tomatoes, that’s great!  This is how you prepare them:

a.      Place a large pot of simmering salted water atop the stove and bring it close to a boil.  Wash and hull 2 quarts of roma tomatoes.  Into each, carve an “x” approximately 1/16th of an inch deep; this will allow you to peel the skins away much more easily.

b.      Drop the toms into the simmering water and keep there for 30-40 seconds at most but definitely NO longer! As soon as they’re done, remove them and DROP THEM INTO A BOWL OF ICE WATER IMMEDIATELY!  Keep them there for 3-4 minutes; then, remove them and peel of the skins underneath cold running water and place upon a clean towel to dry. 

c.      Slice the romas in half lengthwise and with a spoon, scoop out the “meat” and set aside.  Take the outer shells and cut these into medium-dice.  Take the guts and run them through the food processor or robo-coupe and puree and then—set aside and proceed.

12. Place a large Sautoir or Sauteuse atop a medium-high flame and when it’s fairly warm, add the olive oil and heat it up.  Then, add the onions and sauté quickly, stirring constantly, until softened and translucent.  Add the garlic and cook some more until the air’s aromatic and the mixture is soft and tender.

13. Add the mushrooms and the seasonings and reduce the heat to medium.  Cook—stirring occasionally—as the mushrooms render their juice to the pan.  Continue cooking and after several minutes, add the ruby port and the balsamic vinegar and allow it to reduce slowly.  Finally, add the tomatoes and the last two herbs and cook for another 10-12 minutes over medium-low flame.

14. When your mushroom-braise begins to thicken to the consistency of Spanish sauce or some such other thick vegetable-type sauce, pull it off of the burner.  Allow it to sit for several minutes before proceeding with it.  Use it for whatever recipe calls for it, and if you have leftovers, be sure to store them in a sanitized airtight container and label, date, and refrigerate. 

15. It will remain usable for 1-2 days.  Normally, line cooks will prepare this on a daily basis so that it always looks and tastes its best.  It can be used as an accompaniment, a side dish, or pasta topping with whole wheat, spinach, beet, or even tomato pasta.  It can be used for whatever other recipe you have that calls for it.

Ragu is perfect for vegetarian dishes so keep it handy in your recipe cabinet.  It can be altered to endless different varieties with the addition of subtraction of ingredients with the exception of the tomatoes, onions, and garlic.  It’s flavorful and perfect for diet-conscious diners in search of “light” foods. Here’s the recipe for the Broken Glass Garnish:

(#1305) BROKEN GLASS GARNISH





Yield: about 1 cup / Mis-en-place: about 20 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
.25
Cup
3/16” square-cut carrots
Rinsed
.25
Cup
3/16” square-cut red cabbage
Rinsed
.25
Cup
3/16” square celery
Rinsed
.25
Cup
3/16” square cut red bell pepper
Rinsed


Method:

16. Rinse cabbage well, and then toss all ingreds together. Let them dry a little bit at room temp then keep on the cold line. I will tell you when to utilize this garnish which is a very attractive one; it reminds me of the stars in the heavens.

This is a very important garnish that you will use on all sorts of things so keep it available at all times. Here’s the “how-to” information on preparing perfect asparagus:

(#1610) HOW TO PREPARE ASPARAGUS



Asparagus is a tricky vegetable at times to prepare, one that novices tend to mess up.  In the “old days” or my grandparents, back in the 1960’s and prior, vegetable cookery was seen as secondary to whatever source of protein was being slapped on the table.  ALL vegetables were overcooked, lacked vitamin content, and generally looked horrible.  Nowadays, however, fresh vegetable cookery is important, veggies are seen as a full partner in whatever is being served, and they must be cooked in such a way that they look, taste, and smell spectacular and have 99% of their vitamin and mineral content.

As we know or should know asparagus is one of the MOST expensive vegetables on the market today as it’s a specialty veg that even though available all year-round, has its own seasons, more or less.  Many times, we see it in different thicknesses, the thinnest ones being the most sought-after while the thicker ones are soup material.  Generally, professionals save ALL parts of the asparagus including the wooden lower ends because when peeled, they make marvelous vegetable dishes of their own or are used as the base for the stock used in cream of asparagus soup. 

When you bring fresh asparagus home, trim off the lower ends by about ONE inch; you may either save or discard it.  Place the asparagus into a glass-like container or a thermos with water to about two inches.  Place it trimmed-base-side-DOWN in the water and allow it drink it in: in this way, it will keep the vegetable moist and ready for action rather than drying it out and allowing it go limp.  Always cover the top of the container with a moistened towel to keep it humidified. Fresh asparagus may be kept this way for 2-4 days, the former time for cooking being preferable to the latter.

Asparagus can be cooked in one of three ways: (1) the old-fashioned way in a pot of boiling, salted water; (2) in a vegetable steamer; or (3) in an asparagus steamer or in a Bain Marie or double-boiler.  The first way is okay, the second, better, and the third way, best.  As most of us may not have an asparagus steamer, the Number Two way is best followed by Number One.

Prior to cooking the asparagus, rinse it underneath cold running water and then select serving portions and tie each group with white string at both top and bottom: this allows for easier handling and will prevent the all-important tips from being broken off.  Have water in the pot, the double-boiler, or the asparagus steamer at a moderate boil and make sure you’ve salted it with kosher salt.  The salt is what keeps a vegetable’s color the same as in its raw form.  Also, have a large pot or bowl full of ice water as cooked vegetables must be immediately chilled to also maintain their raw color.

Yield:  8 servings  / Mis-en-place: 1-2 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2-3
#
Fresh asparagus, cleaned and trimmed

Boiling water

2
Teaspoons
Kosher salt

Ice water




Method:

17. Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Have the salted water ready and going and when you place the asparagus within it, cover it up and let it go.  The thinner the asparagus, the quicker the cooking time so figure 60 seconds or less.  If it’s extremely thin, allow no more than 20-30 seconds.  As soon as it’s al dente-tender, REMOVE it and plunge immediately into ICE WATER.  This retards any further cooking as well as captures the color like a photograph captures an image.

18. As soon as it’s chilled, remove it and allow it to dry.  To serve, heat it up in the microwave and then serve as your recipe directs you to do.

Asparagus is a classy vegetable and one that figures in many different dishes ranging from vegetable dishes to Auguste Escoffier entrees such as Veal Oskar, Veau ala Cliff, and a wide range of others.  It is important to know how to fix it if one wants to be a great chef and this primer will help you do that.

Final Preparation:

19.  When it’s time to prepare the entire meal, have everything ready to go.  Have the potato pancakes ready to cook and also the asparagus blanched.  Sprinkle the Stinkbug Seasoning on the filets and rub with vegetable oil.  Have a flame-fed broiler ready to go, taking care to brush the grates with a wire brush to remove any residual charcoal deposits and then rub the grates with burlap doused in vegetable oil to “season” the grills.  When hot, drop the steaks onto the broiler and mark with a diamond-pattern on both sides.  Sprinkle with more Stinkbug Seasoning to flavor the meat and occasionally brush with vegetable oil.  Cook to preference but in this case; we’re going to cook them medium-rare.  Depending upon the width of the meat, thicker steaks will require a bit more time whereas slimmer ones won’t.  Medium-rare steaks will feel soft to the touch but NOT super-soft whereas more well-done meat will feel firm. 

20. Meanwhile, prepare the potato pancakes so they come off of the griddle at about the same time and also have the ragu ready to go.  Finally, spray the blanched asparagus with PAM or with some such other food release spray and broil quickly on a cooler side of the broiler.  Sprinkle it with Stinkbug Seasoning and a bit of balsamic vinegar.

21. Place two potato pancakes on each of four plates.  Take the filets and cut each one 3-4 times without severing any of the slices from one end and fan them out atop the potato pancakes on each plate—one steak per plate.  Top with Portobello Mushroom Ragu and place 6-8-ounces of grilled asparagus alongside each.  Dust with freshly minced parsley flakes and sprinkle Broken Glass Garnish around the rims of each plate.  Finally, plant a parsley sprig on each plate next to the fanned-out filet mignons.  Then, they’re ready to serve.

This is a beautiful and modern way to serve filet mignons.  Of course, many people won’t care for the ragu atop their steaks preferring demi-glace at best or A-1 Steak Sauce or Heinz 57 Steak Sauce at worst so play it by ear.  Most everybody loves the potato pancakes and broiled asparagus but this is a dish that needs to be prepared with confidence as too much can go wrong if one isn’t paying close attention to it.

--------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

All I can say is that it’s good to be back especially on the Countdown to the End Days, man oh man, it’s sort of exciting!  Look at all of the stuff going on in the world today, who would ever have thought that what’s going on right now would be going on?  We are living in dangerous times and yet, we talk the international language of food without stop here at the Elemental News of the Day.  Food is the topic 24/7/365 and if the world falls apart this December 21, well, what the hell?  We had a good life while we had it and when it’s gone: it’s gone! Personally, I don’t believe in all of this talk but then when one looks at the world and what’s going on in it, all of the terrorism, hatred, anger, madness, and one can’t help but wonder…just a little bit—right?  But we’re not going to begin our week together worrying about this stuff, when I come back in six months, sometime in December, maybe right at the date: we’ll worry about it then!                                

Anyhow, let us close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by STEPPENWOLF and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com—we want to make some money here so help us out by buying something!  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

Thank you!

Elvin C. McCardle

Elvin C. McCardle

American Culinary Federation, Inc., CWC

_____________________________________________________________________

This is a photo of me as a young chef back in the 1970's when I was working as a sous chef at a resort hotel over on the coast around Ventura Beach, California. I began my career working as a busboy in 1963, move to washing pots in 1965, became a chef's apprentice in 1969 and have been a career professional ever since. I am still involved in professional foodservice as a consultant for food and beverage professionals.
Chef Elvin C. McCardle writes from Ventura, CA.
---30---

The END Commentary for Monday, June 11, 2012 by Chef Elvin C. McCardle

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef Elvin C. McCardle



Recipe created by Chef Elvin C. McCardle on May 14, 2007 in Honolulu, HI.

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The Chef’s Culinary Nightmare: the end is indeed coming soon so beware of BOTH November 06 AND December 21, 2012!

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