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Saturday, May 5, 2012

“Special Menus Index, Pt. LVI: ‘Mother’s Day Menu, Pt. VII—Fabulous Bakery Desserts and Beverage Seminar—Real Strawberry Mousse, Sour Cream Chocolate Cake, Tropical Iceberg, and Peach Melba—two Wonderful Desserts and two Great Beverages with which to wash them down” by Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus



We continue offering the discography of one of the all-time great San Francisco bands: HOT TUNA!  Their THIRTEENTH album—“Pair of Dice Found”—was released in 1990 and is another great installment from a great band.  There’s plenty of new material and of course, bluesy remakes of tunes like “Eve of Destruction!”  We love this CD and urge you to go to Amazon.com where you’ll definitely want to buy it NOW!  Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.  





COUNTDOWN TO THE END OF THE MAYAN CALENDAR…


                                                                              

Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 231 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!




                                                                                      


STINKBUG 2012


                                                                                  


Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus

END Commentary 05-06-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 3,711.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Sunday, May 06, 2012 by Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus

SPECIAL MENUS INDEX, PT. LVI

Special Menus Index, Pt. LVI: ‘Mother’s Day Menu, Pt. VII—Fabulous Bakery Desserts and Beverage Seminar—Real Strawberry Mousse, Sour Cream Chocolate Cake, Tropical Iceberg, and Peach Melba—two Wonderful Desserts and two Great Beverages with which to wash them down” by Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus



Bakersfield, CA, 05-06-2012 Su: Sunday has finally arrived and that is always such a wonderful thing, my friends, as it allows us to put our best and most creative recipes together and then bid farewell until the next time.  Tomorrow, Chef Elmer K. Hootenstein will be coming in to join us and he’ll be taking you into the week of Mother’s Day—thank God we’re back on schedule and our menu appeared the week prior to rather than the week of the event!  We’re still learning the ropes here so give us a break, its difficult working in the world and then writing blogs at night and sometimes, sometimes mistakes do happen and when they do, we appreciate the fact that you jump right in and alert us!

Today, we will make our two desserts PLUS two great alcoholic beverages with which to tickle mom’s fancy.  Of course, if Mom doesn’t imbibe, you’ll have to drink her share but remember: if you drink, don’t drive and if you drive, don’t drink.  Here’s our menu:

Mothers Day 2012 Dinner Menu

I.                   Jellied Apricot-Cheese Salad

II.                Ensalada du Vermont

III.             Spinach Salad with Chevre Goat Cheese 

IV.             Potage ala Mongole

V.                Cream of Celery-Apple Soup

VI.             Veal Cordon Bleu

VII.          Sauteed Quail Salinas-style

VIII.       Carrot Soufflé 

IX.             Scandinavian Vegetables

X.                Buttered Peas with Button Mushrooms

XI.             Confetti Rice

XII.          Lyonnais Potatoes

XIII.       San Joaquin Orange-Rye Rolls

XIV.       Caraway-Onion Muffins

XV.          Sour Cream-Chocolate Cake

XVI.       Real Strawberry Mousse

XVII.    Tropical Iceberg

XVIII. Peach Melba

Let’s jump right into it, there’s not a great deal to say, I guess. Here’s the very first recipe, for the REAL strawberry mousse: what do I mean by that? That it’s not made from a fricking mix!

(#1466) REAL STRAWBERRY MOUSSE



Making mousse from scratch is a time-honored art that sadly has gone astray over the past two decades what with the availability of dry mixes available from foodservice purveyors.  In the old days, ala the 1970’s and 1980’s, dessert chefs labored to make the freshest and the best mousses, custards, and puddings in the kitchen so that the dessert tray or cart would go out with beautiful desserts each and every night.  People didn’t mind spending money for a dessert as long as they knew it was made from scratch in the restaurant’s kitchen. 

Real strawberry mousse is just that: an amalgamation of whipped cream, meringue, custard, and fresh strawberries all combined in one lovely medley of flavor, taste, and appearance.  This is definitely one of the best ones I ever made and I still make it today in restaurants that appreciate the real deal! Go for it; make it your own, just work at perfecting it so that it will come out the same each and every time. Note: we use Kirsch as strawberry brandy is almost impossible to obtain but if you make your own, go for it!

Yield:  12 champagne glasses  / Mis-en-place: 60 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
The Strawberry Base:
1-2/3
Quarts
Finely-minced fresh strawberries

2/3
Cup
Granulated sugar

1
Tablespoon
Torani’s strawberry syrup

The Egg Custard:
4
Each
Large AAA egg yolks

1.5
Teaspoons
Gran Marnier

1.5
Teaspoons
Kirsch cherry brandy

.125
Cup
Water

1
Teaspoon
Torani’s strawberry syrup

The Body:
2
Cups
Heavy cream

1.5
Cups
Powdered sugar

2
Teaspoons
Vanilla extract

The Egg Whites:
4
Each
Large AAA egg whites

.25
Teaspoon
Cream of tartar

5/8
Cup
Granulated sugar

1
Teaspoon
Vanilla extract

The Finish:
2
Cups
Heavy cream

1.5
Cups
Powdered sugar

2
Teaspoons
Vanilla extract

12
Each
Gaufrettes

.25
Cup
Graham cracker crumbs

3
Tablespoons
Granulated sugar

.125
Cup
Melted butter

12
Sprigs
Fresh mint
Rinsed
12
Each
Large strawberries, hulled and fanned




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Prep the strawberries as directed and set aside. Make the first measure of whipped cream by placing it into a mixing bowl equipped with a whip attachment and begin whipping it at medium-high speed.  As it begins to thicken, add the powdered sugar—slowly—along the sides and then the vanilla.  Continue whipping until it’s got fairly stiff peaks but don’t over-whip; transfer to a sanitized container, cover, and refrigerate. 

2.      Have a double-boiler or a Bain Marie set-up over near-boiling water but make sure the water doesn’t actually touch the bottom of the top pot.  Spray it lightly with PAM or with some such other food release spray.  In a bowl, scramble the egg yolks with the liqueurs, water, and syrup.  Transfer it to the top bowl of the double-boiler and cook, stirring constantly, until a custard forms.  As soon as it does, remove it and transfer it to a sanitized bowl and refrigerate for the time-being.  Never let it touch the surface of the water as if it begins to scramble, you’ve lost it and will have to start over.  This is like making hollandaise sauce so be careful and take your time.

3.      Stir the sugared strawberries from the beginning into the whipped cream using a spatula.  Return to the refrigerator. Under the “Egg Whites,” combine the granulated sugar and cream of tartar together and set aside.

4.      Clean out the mixer and the whip exceedingly well and then wipe it dry.  Make sure everything is totally dry because we’re going to whip the egg whites now and if there’s the slightest hint of moisture on the bowl or the whip, the meringue won’t set and you’ll have to do this over, too.

5.      Beat the egg whites at medium-high speed and as they begin to form peaks, begin scaling in the granulated sugar and the cream of tartar mixture.  Add the vanilla extract, too.  Do this slowly so that the whites aren’t overpowered by the additions and allow them to form firm peaks ala meringue.  Then, transfer the whites to a sanitized container and refrigerate. 

6.      Meanwhile, work on everything under the FINISH: have the Gaufrettes ready.  Make the whipped cream by doing what you did for the first batch for the second.  Wash, hull, and fan the strawberries.  Make the Graham cracker crumbs by combining them with the granulated sugar and the melted butter.  Have all of this ready for action including washing and trimming the mint leaves and then drying them; if you have a salad spinner, utilize it.

7.      Bring the whipped cream out from the first round and fold the egg whites into it and then stir in the egg yolks using the electric mixer and a whip attachment.  Do it at low speed so that everything is well-blended.

8.      Transfer the mixture to a clean pastry bag outfitted with a large star tip.  Twist it at the top so that it’s straining to get out the bottom and then using a circular undulating motion, pipe the mousse into 12 chilled champagne glasses.  Then, using a clean pastry bag, pipe a large rosette of whipped cream atop each mousse, sprinkle with the graham cracker crumbs, top with a fanned strawberry, a mint sprig and finally, a Gaufrette.  Now, they’re ready to serve.

This is a lot of work but making mousse from scratch is a wonderful thing as most cooks in today’s kitchens have absolutely no idea as to how to do it.  Modern cooks buy their mixes in dry form in cans and boy, does it taste like it.

Ah, well, here’s our cake:

(#1467) SOUR CREAM CHOCOLATE CAKE



Nowadays, restaurants have become so boring and much of it can be laid at the door of the economic situation over the past 20 years or so.  When I started out, wages were much lower (but the sad fact of the matter is that wages have regressed almost to the point of what they were in the 1980’s due to a variety of reasons) that most kitchens could have larger staffs on hand.  The cost of goods wasn’t as high either so it made sense to have someone onboard who could bake from scratch, someone who cut meat, and someone who could make soups.  Sometimes, the head chef did some or all of these jobs but most of the time, there were more kitchen personnel who could do a variety of things.

Unfortunately, what with the economic situation being what it is and the fact that no one is serious about regulating immigration; we’ve got more people looking for jobs than there are jobs.  Also specialization has made it such that it’s cheaper and easier to buy everything premade from the purveyors than to make it on the premises so there’s no need for bakers in a normal hotel or restaurant kitchen.  Sure, in the big cities in the big restaurants, hotels, and country clubs, they still do things the way they’re meant to be but the norm is to have less help making less money than they did in the 1980’s and in buying everything already made so there’s no mistakes, lower food cost, and less help. 

The purpose of this recipe article is merely to teach you how to make a scratch cake, not to indict the economy, the government, or the present administration but it would be great if things would change.  Otherwise, the bakery arts will be lost to us forever and hotels and restaurants will all be serving the same things—so much for progress, eh? Anyhow, this is a great cake recipe and one you can make at home instead of a box mix.  The frosting is easily made which all frostings are and much less costly than a store-bought frosting from the supermarket.  Go for it!

Yield:  1—13” x 9” x 2” pan  / Mis-en-place: 1.5 hours:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
3
Ounces
Semi-sweet chocolate

.5
Cup
Melted butter

1
Cup
Hot milk (in double-boiler)

2
Cups
Light brown sugar

2
Cups
Un-sifted cake flour 

1.5
Teaspoons
Baking soda

.25
Teaspoon
Baking powder

1
Teaspoon
Salt

2
Each
Large AAA eggs

.5
Cup
Sour cream

1
Teaspoon
Vanilla extract

2
Cups
Quick chocolate frosting (below)




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Spray a 13” x 9” x 2” baking pan with PAM or with some such other food release spray.  Line it with wax paper and spray the paper, too.  Be sure to use reflective baking pans and NEVER dark or glass pans if you can help it; the dark especially absorbs the heat rather than reflects it which causes the finished product to be crusty, dry, and many times burnt.  ONLY use aluminum or stainless steel implements.

2.      Preheat your standard oven to 350°F or your convection oven—fan “on”—to 300°F.

3.      To the milk in the top of the double-boiler, add the chocolate and the melted butter and heat until the chocolate has melted; then pour it into a shallow pan to cool down to tepid. 

4.      Combine the flour, brown sugar, baking soda, baking powder, and salt together and blend well. 

5.      Using an electric mixer equipped with a paddle attachment, beat the eggs till light and foamy and then add the sour cream and vanilla extract. 

6.      To the mixture in the mixing bowl, add the tepid chocolate-milk mixture and then fold in the dry ingredients blending until combined.  Mix the batter at medium speed for a minute or so and then pour it into the prepared pan.  Shake it to settle it and then place the pan on the middle oven rack and bake. 

7.      Bake for 35 minutes OR until the cake proofs clean when tested with a cake tester or a paring knife inserted dead-center: if it comes out clean, the cake is done and if not, continue baking until it does. 

8.      When it’s done, remove it from the oven and place it upon a wire cooling rack and allow it to cool.  Prepare the following frosting below:

(#1468) QUICK CHOCOLATE FROSTING



Yield:  2 cups  / Mis-en-place: 10-15 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
4
Ounces
Semi-sweet chocolate

.25
Cup
Softened butter

3
Cups
Powdered sugar

1/3
Cup
Cold milk

.125
Teaspoon
Salt

1.5
Teaspoons
Torani’s Chocolate Milano syrup

1
Teaspoon
Vanilla extract




Method:

9.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Melt the chocolate in a small skillet or in the microwave: keep a close eye on it and stop the minute it’s melted.

10. Beat the butter on the mixer with the use of a paddle attachment and then gradually begin scaling in the powdered sugar along the sides of the bowl.  Continue beating at medium-high speed until all of the sugar is incorporated and as you add it, add some of the milk along with the salt, syrup, and vanilla.

11. If it stiffens too much, add a bit more milk but continue mixing until all is combined.  Then, spread your frosting on a cooled cake with the use of a rubber spatula or a frosting spreader.  Use a bit of cold water to aid you in spreading it and then use a decorating comb aka “cock’s comb” to score the surface of the frosting to give it a classic design.

12. Always refrigerate leftovers.  To frost the cake, it’s always best to invert it.  This means, sprinkle the top of it with granulated sugar and then put the bottom—the flat side—on the top of the baked cake.  Then, taking great care, flip the cake upside down so that the top is resting upon the bottom of the pan. 

13. Next, remove the baking pan from the cake taking care to NOT tear it.  Help the cake loosen itself from the wax paper and fall out onto the top of the bottom of the second pan.  Then, remove the top pan entirely away leaving the BOTTOM of the cake exposed atop the other pan.  The purpose of this is to give you the flattest side there is to frost.  Also, if need be because the sides are burnt or something like that, trim them off.  If you don’t need to, don’t—the cake frosts much more easily if they’re still attached.

14. Using a frosting spreader or a rubber spatula—occasionally dipped in cold water—spread the frosting across the top of the cake.  Never allow frosting to pull back onto the spatula so that you get cake crumbs mixed within it—this is unprofessional!  No, remove the spatula, wiping it clean if necessary, and dip it in cold water.  It always helps to dab frosting in 4-5 places on the surface being frosted so that you can continually spread the frosting out farther and farther into the different piles for lack of a better word.  Keep going in ONE direction so that you don’t pull off parts of the cake or collect crumbs in the frosting.

15. When doing the sides, be sure to use a bit more water so that you can easily do it.  Then, use a cock’s comb aka decorating comb to score the frosted cake’s surface with attractive lines going in one direction.  Finally, sprinkle sprinkles atop the cake’s frosted area and then to secure them, place a piece of wax paper lightly atop them and press—gently—just enough to get them to stick.  Then, pull the wax paper away and there you go: a finished chocolate sour cream cake!

Note: This is an excellent frosting that is quickly made and versatile, being used for many different things whether they be cakes, brownies, cookies, or anything else for which you might need frosting.

This is a great cake recipe obtained from my beloved grandmother decades ago when I was a young cook and in need of some culinary expertise.  Back then, we were fortunate to have family members who knew the tricks and the secrets to scratch-baking and believe it or not, this one was one that has been with me for the past four decades.  I hope it’s with you as long as it’s been with me and that you pass it on to a family member so that it will endure forever!

Now, we’ll make our two beverages:

(#B001) TROPICAL ICEBERG



Having had opportunities to spend time behind the bar at different times in my career, I learned the art of creating and making drinks.  Tropical Icebergs were one of the specialties at one of the country clubs in which I worked and the bartender—a great friend of mine—taught me how to make it.

Yield:  4 servings  / Mis-en-place: 4-5 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
6
Ounces
Finlandia pineapple vodka

2
Ounces
Bols’ banana liqueur

2
Medium
Bananas, peeled

2
Ounces
Cream of coconut

1
Ounce
Half-and-Half

2
Teaspoons
Torani’s banana syrup

.125
Cup
Colored sweetened coconut




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Colored coconut can be made in advance by soaking coconut in different food colors in different bowls for an hour or so; then, drain and allow air-drying for an hour or so.

2.      To make the drink, blend everything (with the exception of the coconut) in the blender, mixing well.  Then, pour it into four margarita glasses and sprinkle each with some of the colored coconut.  Be sure that you die it at least four colors like red, yellow, green, and blue: it’s beautiful.

This is a great blended alcoholic beverage that everyone seems to enjoy.  Keep the recipe handy, you’ll be using it time and again!

Here’s our final recipe:

(#B002) PEACH MELBA



When I was a drinker, I was a fan of cocktails because there were so many wonderful creations that could be conjured up by a skilled bartender.  In many ways, I wish I had entered the bar side of the equation rather than the food side as my career would probably have been extended by many more years than what it is now.  Anyhow, this is a delightful concoction that virtually everyone I know enjoys! Here we go:

Yield:  4 servings  / Mis-en-place: 4-5 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
3
Ounces
Captain Morgan’s spiced rum

3
Ounces
Chambord raspberry liqueur

1
Cup
Island Oasis peach frozen peach cocktail mix

.5
Cup
Heavy cream

8
Each
Canned or poached peach halves

Crushed ice

.25
Cup
Torani’s raspberry syrup

4
Each
Sprigs of fresh mint
Rinsed



Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Place everything with the exception of the last two ingredients into the blender and fill it with crushed ice. Blend until well-mixed.  Then, pour it into four chilled margarita glasses, douse with raspberry syrup, and top with a sprig of fresh mint. Serve on doily-lined cocktail plates.

A classic beverage to be sure, this is the alcoholic beverage model of the great Auguste Escoffier dessert creation, Peach Melba, in which poached peaches are placed in the bottom of champagne or red wine glasses and topped with vanilla ice cream over which raspberry syrup is then poured.  Topped with mint, it’s a splendid dessert, much less drink!

---------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

That’s it for me! Hooray, I’m off now for the next five months!  Anyhow, I shouldn’t gloat, I know that but as mentioned yesterday, it’s difficult to find the time to do everything, I am considering opening a restaurant in Bakersfield, CA, that will be a fancy, fine-dining establishment but it takes a great deal of time to develop the concept, the menu, and to gather the financial backing that is so necessary to open a new business.  Hopefully, I’ll be able to employ a large number of people and maybe the Obama Administration will make it possible for me to do so.  We’ll discuss that at a later date! Tomorrow, the Hooter will be coming in to sit at the stainless steel console and will be running things here in Oildale or so I’ve been told for the upcoming week.  As always, he comes up with nothing but the best recipes and everyone loves his work: he’s by far one of the most popular authors here at the Elemental News of the Day! Give him a big Elemental welcome tomorrow! Bye!            

   Anyhow, let us close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by HOT TUNA and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com—we want to make some money here so help us out by buying something!  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

Thank you!

Tiresias

Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus
CEC, CPC, ACF

This is me as a young chef at an awards dinner at the Bon Adventure hotel in the 1980's when I was working there as the Night Sous Chef's Assistant. I began cooking in the 1960's in my native Greece before moving to Los Angeles, California, in the early 1970's. I apprenticed under an ACF Master Chef shortly thereafter and now here I am. I still am involved in professional foodservice as an instructor.

---30---

The END Commentary for Sunday, May 06, 2012 by Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus



.



Recipe created by Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus on April 19, 1997 in Beverly Hills, CA.

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STINKBUG AT THE COUNTDOWN TO THE END DAYS

                                                                                                                                                                 

                                                                     

This is #911 a 16” x 20" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Canyon Creek." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Canyons
                                                                                  


















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