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Friday, May 4, 2012

“Special Menus Index, Pt. LV: ‘Mother’s Day Menu, Pt. VI—Classic Quickbreads and Muffins/Yeast Bread Seminar—San Joaquin Valley Orange-Rye Buns and Caraway-Onion Muffins—two Bakery Delights for Mother’s Day Dinner” by Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus



We continue offering the discography of one of the all-time great San Francisco bands: HOT TUNA!  Their TWELFTH album—“Historic Hot Tuna”—was released in 1985 and was a collection of older material.  The CD doesn’t have a large offering of tunes but still, the reviews speak highly of it.  We love this CD and urge you to go to Amazon.com where you’ll definitely want to buy it NOW!  Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.  





COUNTDOWN TO THE END OF THE MAYAN CALENDAR…


                                                                    
Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 232 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!





                                                                                    


STINKBUG 2012


                                                                                  



Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus

END Commentary 05-05-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 3,224.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Saturday, May 05, 2012 by Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus

SPECIAL MENUS INDEX, PT. LV

Special Menus Index, Pt. LV: ‘Mother’s Day Menu, Pt. VI—Classic Quickbreads and Muffins/Yeast Bread Seminar—San Joaquin Valley Orange-Rye Buns and Caraway-Onion Muffins—two Bakery Delights for Mother’s Day Dinner” by Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus



Bakersfield, CA, 05-05-2012 S: Here it is, Saturday and that means we will be doing our breads today and our desserts and beverages tomorrow.  Baking is one of those talents that makes a chef more valuable than if he or she doesn’t bake and I’m fortunate that I started working at an early age—granted, in my native Greece—but once over here, I had the good fortune of being able to get my first sous chef position and in doing so, it put me in contact with the hotel’s bakery.  There, I would visit the bread-baker and he taught me a great deal of invaluable lessons after my regular shift ended.  In turn, I showed him some of the things I learned in the Old Country and that were a beneficial aspect of our relationship.  We all have this duty to instruct those coming up behind or beneath us and it’s more so a duty because of the American Culinary Federation, Inc., it is one of their chief tenets of their purpose for being.  Too often, the lessons that need to be taught aren’t because the old school chefs are very protective of their knowledge thinking that if it’s shared, it will lead to their demise because the student will then take their job.  Sure, this has happened on occasion but nowadays, we are all professional and that simply no longer happens.  Anyhow, the relationship that you, the readership of the Elemental News of the Day and we, as the culinary professionals is one of mutual trust, respect, and admiration.  I admire each and every one of you who comes here on a daily basis to be instructed when you could go out and find what you need to know at any one of the thousands of foodservice blogs across the Internet.

We will be making ONE yeast bread and ONE quickbread item today.  The first is an orange-flavored rye roll and the other is a caraway-onion muffin.  There are two types of muffins in this world: sweet and savory.  The sweet ones, we’re all familiar with as that has been the majority of what’s been done here at the END.  Savory muffins are dinner muffins that are not as sweet as their cousins, they’re flavored with different things like onions and caraway seeds such as the one we’re doing today.  They’re handy to have because sometimes, one needs to be able to whip out a quick bread recipe for unexpected business or company and yeast breads take too long; therefore, we go to the next best thing, the savory muffin, and that is what we’ll be doing today.  Here’s our menu:

Mothers Day 2012 Dinner Menu

I.                   Jellied Apricot-Cheese Salad

II.                Ensalada du Vermont

III.             Spinach Salad with Chevre Goat Cheese 

IV.             Potage ala Mongole

V.                Cream of Celery-Apple Soup

VI.             Veal Cordon Bleu

VII.          Sauteed Quail Salinas-style

VIII.       Carrot Soufflé 

IX.             Scandinavian Vegetables

X.                Buttered Peas with Button Mushrooms

XI.             Confetti Rice

XII.          Lyonnais Potatoes

XIII.       San Joaquin Orange-Rye Rolls

XIV.       Caraway-Onion Muffins

XV.          Sour Cream-Chocolate Cake

XVI.       Real Strawberry Mousse

XVII.    Tropical Iceberg

XVIII. Peach Melba

We will begin with the yeast bread recipe as that is the first one on the menu and also the longest.  We will be using the Brick Method as devised by Stinkbug because it is so good in mimicking the steam-injection ovens used at bakeries that to NOT use it would be unwise and unnecessary.  One just has to be careful to keep from being burned or scalded so pay close attention to the directions.  Here we go:

(#155) SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY ORANGE-RYE ROLLS



Yield:  18: 1.75-2-ounce rolls  / Mis-en-place: 60-90 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
3
Tablespoons
Tepid water

1.5
Ounces
Budweiser-brand fresh cake yeast (or 0.5-ounce SAF yeast)
1.5
Each
Large AAA eggs

.25
Cup
Warm orange juice

.25
Cup
Warm milk

.25
Cup
Warm coffee

1.5
Tablespoons
Honey

2.25
Teaspoons
Granulated sugar

1.75
Teaspoons
Kosher salt

1
Tablespoon
Orange zest

3/8
Cup
Vegetable oil

.75
Cup
Medium-rye flour

2.75-3.25 +
Cups
Bread flour

Yellow cornmeal

The Finish:
1.5
Each
Large AAA eggs, beaten

.125
Cup
Cold water

.125
Cup
Orange zest

Melted butter




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! We will be using a pound scale and the Brick Method.  The Brick Method is this:

a.      When directed to do so, heat a pair of fire bricks on the stove—it’s best if you have gas rather than electric—and also a pot of water.  This is designed to create the baking effect known as “oven spring” which is obtained by the injection of steam into the bread oven at a specific point in time.  Since most restaurants and no home kitchen that I know of have steam-injection ovens, we use two bricks, a pan, and boiling water to achieve the effect.  It’s dangerous so you need heavy-duty mitts and also need to stand back when pouring the water over the bricks.  The dough is then inserted into the oven and the bricks and water are left in there for about 10 minutes; afterwards, they’re removed and the bread continues to bake.  You will be directed WHEN to do this and if you don’t care to try this or haven’t the bricks, then bake the bread without them.  But this is a marvelous way to make fantastic loaves and rolls so if you’re game, give it a shot!

2.      Place the first measure of tepid water, approximately 105-115°F for fresh cake yeast into the bowl of an electric mixer equipped with a dough hook attachment and begin rotating the hook on low speed to dissolve the yeast.  Cover the bowl with a cloth towel and place someplace moderately warm like a high kitchen shelf or an unused oven.  Too hot will cook the yeast and KILL it; too cold, it won’t awaken. 

3.      After about 5-6 minutes, check the yeast: it should appear bubbly which signifies that the yeast organisms are alive and well.  It is the byproduct of them that will cause our bread to rise so it’s important to make sure that our yeast is good and not old or dead.  Pay attention to the dates on the package.  In the old days in the restaurants, we used to buy our fresh cake yeast from the local baker so we always had primo stuff.  As for the SAF yeast, that is combined directly with the flour.

4.      Return the mixing bowl to the mixer once more and hook up the hook attachment.  BEAT the THREE eggs together (1.5 for the bread and 1.5 for the Finish) and then force them through a fine-meshed sieve into a bowl.  Divide them equally putting one half into the mixer and combining the other half with the small amount of water: this will be your eggwash so cover it with plastic wrap and refrigerate it until called for.

5.      Begin rotating the hook on low speed and after adding the egg(s), add the warm milk, orange juice, and coffee—nothing warmer than 105-110°F.  Add the honey, sugar, salt, orange zest, and the vegetable oil.  Continue rotating the hook on low speed and then add the rye flour.  Blend well.

6.      At this point, put a pot of water on the stove and the pair of bricks onto the burner.  Heat the water almost to a boil and the bricks over a medium-low flame for the moment. Preheat your standard oven to 400°F or your convection oven—fan in the “on” position—to 350°F.  Spray two half sheet pans with PAM or with some such other food release spray and then line them with either parchment or wax paper.  Spray the paper, too, with the PAM and then lightly dust with the yellow cornmeal: this mimics the floor of the oven in a brick oven.

7.      Now, begin scaling in the bread flour along the sides of the mixing bowl, all the while mixing on low speed.  Continue adding bread flour, the amount will vary due to the time of year, the humidity, and the quality of the flour—this is the imprecise part about yeast-bread-baking.  What we’re looking for is this: we want the dough to climb onto the hook as it rotates about the mixer at low speed and to REMAIN there for about 40-50 seconds as it turns.  As you add flour, it will climb onto the hook but will then pull back off onto the walls of the mixing bowl.  Continue slowly adding flour until it climbs aboard and stays there.

8.      When it finally does, stop rotating the mixer and touch the dough: does it leave an impression but doesn’t stick to your fingers?  Add just a bit more flour and rotate it once more.  We want it to feel un-sticky and want it on that hook and when it finally is, stop mixing.

9.      Pull the dough out onto a lightly-floured work surface.  Begin kneading it by rolling it over by half and then by folding the sides over in upon the middle and rolling it into a ball.  Continue kneading for several minutes—dipping your fingertips in cold water on occasion to facilitate the process—until you have a firm yet springy ball.  It should feel alive, not hard, cold, and dead—this is one of the reasons why it’s important to proof the yeast and to watch the temperatures.  Like it not, yeasts are living creatures and too high a temperature will kill them in the early stages.  We need them alive!

10. When the dough ball feels and looks good, place it into a bowl about double its size that you’ve lightly dusted with flour.  Cover it with a moist-but-NOT-soggy towel and place it somewhere moderately warm to proof—like that high kitchen shelf or unused oven.  Since we’re making rolls, we only have to proof the dough ONCE; and then again when it’s formed into rolls.

11. The dough should take anywhere from 15-30 minutes or so to rise.  It’s important to have a little bit of humidity in the kitchen so have that pot of water steaming and the bricks warming up.  In the wintertime, it generally takes longer and in the summer, it’s generally up-and-out of the bowl before you can stop it.  When it’s up, poke your finger dead-center into the dough: if it springs back, it’s not quite done and if the depression remains there, it’s ready to work.  Bring it out or put it back.

12. When ready, scoop it out onto your lightly-floured work surface one more time.  Using a rolling pin, roll it out about half-an-inch thick.  Then, using a dough knife cut it into long strips and then cut each strip into 12-18 pieces of equal size.  Roll each ball quickly and then space them on the prepared pans about 3 x 5 or 4 x 6 and cover with a cloth.  Set someplace moderately warm once again and let them ALMOST double in size.

13. Heat the bricks and the water and when they’re ready, place a metal pan on the oven’s floor and using a mitt, transfer the bricks into it.  Taking great CAUTION, pour the water onto the bricks standing back so that the oven is swirling with steam.  Bring out the eggwash, brush it onto each roll using a pastry brush and then sprinkle with a bit of the orange zest. 

14. Place the pan(s) onto the middle oven racks and bake for 3-4 minutes; then, remove the bricks and the water from the oven.  Continue baking for another 10-15 minutes or until the rolls feel firm to the touch and their bottoms are browned.  Remove them and place them onto cooling racks where they will finish cooking for another moment or two. 

15. Once somewhat cooled, after 3-4 minutes, brush them with the melted butter giving them a nice sheen.  Then, it’s time to serve.  Take to the table in bread baskets and accompany with plenty of whipped butter.

16. Leftovers can be wrapped in plastic wrap and then sealed airtight in Zip-Loc freezer bags.  They can be reheated in the microwave oven.  Never keep them in the refrigerator as they tend to dry out there.  It’s best to use them within 24 hours.

This is a great roll recipe I developed at the country club I was employed in during the 1980’s and was quite popular.  It was a blend of different flavors, all very tasty and very beautiful to behold.

Here’s the savory muffin recipe:

(#48) CARAWAY-ONION MUFFINS



Yield:  12 medium muffins (.25-cup)  / Mis-en-place: 60 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1-1/3
Tablespoons
Bacon fat

2-2/3
Tablespoons
Minced yellow onions

2/3
Teaspoon
Ground caraway seeds

1
Cup
Whole wheat flour

1
Cup
All-purpose flour

1
Tablespoon
Baking powder

.5
Teaspoon
Baking soda

1
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.5
Cup
Bran cereal

1
Each
Large AAA egg

2
Tablespoons
Brown sugar

3
Tablespoons
Molasses

2
Tablespoons
Vegetable oil

1/3
Cup
Sour cream

1
Cup
Milk

1/3
Teaspoon
Vanilla extract




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Spray a muffin pan with .25-cup size cups with PAM or with some such other food release spray.  Then, line it with paper baking cups and then spray the cups and the tops of the pan with food release spray, too; set aside.  Preheat your standard oven to 400°F or your convection oven to 350°F with the fan in the “on” position. 

2.      Place a sauté pan over a medium burner and add the bacon fat.  When it’s sizzling, add the yellow onions and the ground caraway seed and sauté until the onions are glazed and tender; then, remove from the burner and set aside.

3.      Have the whole wheat flour ready.  Then, combine the all-purpose flour with the baking soda, powder, and salt.  Double-sift it through a fine-meshed sieve and then stir it into the whole wheat flour.  Add the sautéed onions along with whatever drippings remain in the skillet; set aside. Add the bran flakes to it and have ready.

4.      Now, using an electric mixer equipped with a paddle attachment beat the egg until it’s foamy and then add the brown sugar and molasses and beat it at high speed for 20-30 seconds.  Add the vegetable oil and cream the mixture together again at fairly high speed.  Add the milk, sour cream, and the vanilla extract and blend well.

5.      Fold the DRY ingredients into the WET using the least amount of strokes necessary; now this doesn’t mean, just toss the dry into the wet; no, blend them together until a lumpy batter’s formed and then stop.  The idea is to NOT overmix the batter because you’re not paying attention as this will overdevelop the gluten in the flour which makes a quickbread or muffin chewy and less tender: not a desirable trait in a muffin, to be sure.

6.      Cover the mixing bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate the batter for 10-15 minutes; then, bring it out, stir it with a spoon, and then scoop it into the prepared cups using an ice cream scoop right up to the rims.  Shake the pan to gently settle the mixture and then place the pan(s) on the middle oven rack and bake for 20-25 minutes OR until the middle muffins can be pierced by a paring knife and comes out CLEAN.  Pull them out then and place them atop a wire rack to cool.

7.      After 1-2 minutes, gently shake the pan to loosen them and then depan them and serve.  Leftovers can be wrapped in plastic wrap—when totally cool!—and then sealed in Zip-Loc freezer baggies. Never store in the refrigerator as this will dry them out.  Always reheat in the microwave and serve.  Note: it’s always best to use them as soon as possible as they’ll begin to go stale in a day or two.

This is a great savory muffin recipe that is good for dinners and even lunches when something different is required.  People find the blend of rye and caraway flavored with onions to be quite tasty.

---------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

Yeah! Tomorrow is our final day for this go round and then I will be gone until sometime in September or maybe October.  From there, it will be a short countdown to the end of time and all that crap, but then again, one never knows.  The world is in turmoil, people are going crazy, the political campaigns are in full swing and something tells me that a great deal of crises are going to occur before we’re over and through November 02, 2012 and voting day—times are indeed becoming scarier and scarier.  Anyhow, I’m glad to be going off again as it’s difficult to write a blog when one is also teaching classes and grading papers and then working at nights in a local restaurant.  With my skills, I’m able to obtain part-time employment using my skills and making a damned good wage for it as a private contractor.  Enough on that for now…           

   Anyhow, let us close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by HOT TUNA and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com—we want to make some money here so help us out by buying something!  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

Thank you!

Tiresias

Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus
CEC, CPC, ACF

This is me as a young chef at an awards dinner at the Bon Adventure hotel in the 1980's when I was working there as the Night Sous Chef's Assistant. I began cooking in the 1960's in my native Greece before moving to Los Angeles, California, in the early 1970's. I apprenticed under an ACF Master Chef shortly thereafter and now here I am. I still am involved in professional foodservice as an instructor.

---30---

The END Commentary for Saturday, May 05, 2012 by Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus



.



Recipe created by Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus on October 24, 1987 in Beverly Hills, CA.

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STINKBUG AT THE COUNTDOWN TO THE END DAYS

                                                                                  
                                                                    
                                                                                
This is #1396 an 11” x 14" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Bunny Brunch." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Bunnies
                                                                                 


















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