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Tuesday, May 1, 2012

“Special Menus Index, Pt. LII: ‘Mother’s Day Menu, Pt. III—Famous Restaurant Recipes: Veal Cordon Bleu and Sauteed Quail Salinas-style—two wonderful Recipes designed to please Mom” by Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus



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COUNTDOWN TO THE END OF THE MAYAN CALENDAR…


                                                                           
Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 235 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!






                                                                                    


STINKBUG 2012



                                                                                


Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus

END Commentary 05-02-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 3,509.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Wednesday, May 02, 2012 by Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus

SPECIAL MENUS INDEX, PT. LII

Special Menus Index, Pt. LII: ‘Mother’s Day Menu, Pt. III—Famous Restaurant Recipes: Veal Cordon Bleu and Sauteed Quail Salinas-style—two wonderful Recipes designed to please Mom” by Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus



Bakersfield, CA, 05-02-2012 W: Today is Wednesday and we’re back for another exciting day, perhaps the most exciting one of all as we’re going to make our entrees today.  Normally, most of the recipes around here featuring entrees are for four servings which is the basic formulation.  Our salads were for 12 diners on Monday so if you have more than 12 people coming to your Mother’s Day bash, do the math and extend the recipes.  Always take care when expanding a recipe in regards to salt and pepper: each time you expand one, always HALF the salt and pepper and do it each time you increase it.  Let’s say a recipe for four calls for 2 teaspoons of salt and you want to do it for EIGHT people: instead of doubling the salt, you divide the original measure in half which is ONE teaspoon and then you add that one teaspoon to the original TWO for a total of THREE teaspoons or one tablespoon.  It’s important to do this because if you keep doubling the salt and pepper, it’s going to be so overloaded as to make it almost impossible to eat much less enjoy.  That is the science of doing this sort of stuff and the exact “why” I cannot explain, I only know that it works.  The same thing holds true for expanding quickbreads and muffin recipes: it’s important to always do the same thing for them that you do for entrees, soups, salad dressings, and the such: it’s too easy for salt and pepper to concentrate and then ruin the finished product and believe me—there’s almost no way to undo the damage.  The old wives’ tale is that in the circumstances of a soup or roux-based sauce that one could drop a couple of raw potatoes into the mixture and they would leech the salt out but in my experience, this isn’t so.  Take my word on it and you’ll never go wrong.  Anyhow, here’s our menu:

 Mothers Day 2012 Dinner Menu

I.                   Jellied Apricot-Cheese Salad

II.                Ensalada du Vermont

III.             Spinach Salad with Chevre Goat Cheese 

IV.             Potage ala Mongole

V.                Cream of Celery-Apple Soup

VI.             Veal Cordon Bleu

VII.          Sauteed Quail Salinas-style

VIII.       Carrot Soufflé 

IX.             Scandinavian Vegetables

X.                Buttered Peas with Button Mushrooms

XI.             Confetti Rice

XII.          Lyonnais Potatoes

XIII.       San Joaquin Orange-Rye Rolls

XIV.       Caraway-Onion Muffins

XV.          Sour Cream-Chocolate Cake

XVI.       Real Strawberry Mousse

XVII.    Tropical Iceberg

XVIII. Peach Melba

We have such a fine menu, I’m very proud of what I’ve got on tap for you.  The first recipe, Veal Cordon Bleu, is one of the classic French dishes created by the master himself, Chef Auguste Escoffier, 1846-1935, the innovator of everything we know as haute cuisine or classic French.  This is a simple dish paired with a simple sauce—Hollandaise—but it cannot be discounted from the pantheon of great dishes, it’s simply that good.  Let’s make it:

 (#1085) VEAL CORDON BLEU





Yield:  4 servings  / Mis-en-place: 1.5-2 hours:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
4
5-6-ounce
Veal cutlets, lightly tenderized

4
1-oz. slices
Smoked ham

4
1-oz. slices
Muenster cheese

1
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.75
Teaspoon
Granulated garlic

.5
Teaspoon
White pepper

2
Cups
Seasoned flour

2
Each
Large AAA eggs, beaten and strained

.25
Cup
Buttermilk

2
Cups
Seasoned flour

.25
Cup
Cornstarch

2
Cups
Cracker meal

Oil for deep-frying

Vegetable oil

2
Cups
Hollandaise sauce

.125
Cup
Freshly minced parsley flakes
Rinsed
Hungarian paprika

4
Each
Parsley sprigs
Rinsed
2
Cups
Broken Glass Garnish (Recipe #)

3
Cups
Prepared rice du jour

3
Cups
Prepared vegetable du jour




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Here’s the seasoned flour recipe:

(#232) SEASONED FLOUR





1. About 2.5 cups:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2.5
Cups
All-purpose flour

1
Tablespoon
Cayenne pepper

1
Tablespoon
White pepper

1.5
Tablespoon
Hungarian paprika

1.5
Teaspoons
Granulated garlic

1
Tablespoon
Kosher salt

2
Teaspoons
Parsley flakes


Parsley Knot

Method:

2.      Combine all ingredients together and store in an airtight jar, baggie, or whatever else and either keep at room temperature or in your freezer until needed.

It’s important to have a seasoned flour recipe for breading different foods and this is a good one.  You will use this recipe many times.

3.      Prepare the veal cordon bleus: lay the veal out before you and gently pound it with a food hammer (masticator) to soften the meat.  Press each portion as flatly as possible so that you will be able to stuff it and fold it.  If necessary, use additional pieces but you should be able to press it fairly flat with either your palm or a rolling pin but DON’T tear it! Sprinkle each one with the salt, pepper, and garlic.

4.      Upon each slice, lay a slice of smoked ham and a slice of Muenster cheese.  Roll each one over upon itself and press it tight along the edges on the open sides.  Dust them in seasoned flour taking care to press each one on both sides so that it’s sealed.  Place them onto a sheet pan lined with wax paper and sprayed with PAM or with some such other food release spray.  Place the pan inside the freezer for about 20 minutes.

5.      Meanwhile, beat the eggs and force them through a fine-meshed sieve so that they’re homogenous and flow like water.  Then, beat in the buttermilk and again force it through the strainer into a bowl; set aside.  Have a deep-fat fryer set at 375°F ready to go.  If you don’t have one, you’ll have to use some heavy-duty skillets to brown the meat but this is more difficult than being able to use a fryer.

6.      Bring the veal cordon bleus out of the freezer and place each one into the seasoned flour one more time and then into the eggwash mixture.  Lift each one out, allowing the excess liquid to roll off, and then place it into the combination of cornstarch and cracker meal.  Press on each side, taking care to press well so that the edges are as sealed as possible.  Return them to the tray and place them back in the freezer for another 10-15 minutes. Preheat your standard oven to 400°F or your convection oven to 350°F and have ready.

7.      Bring the breaded cordon bleus out of the freezer and drop them into the deep-fat fryer and brown them.  Don’t overdo it but be sure to brown them and then remove from the fryer.  Place them onto a sheet pan sprayed with PAM and then place the pan inside your preheated oven.  Bake for 20-25 minutes OR until a thermometer inserted into the center of each one reads 165°F.  Remove them from the oven then.

a.      Or, if you need to use the skillets, have them over medium flame and spray them with PAM.  Then, add vegetable oil to the pans, heat it up, and when it’s ready, brown the veal portions in the oil on both sides.  Follow the rest of the directions.

8.      During the process, you need to make TWO things: (1) the Hollandaise Sauce and (2) the Broken Glass Garnish.  Also, figure out what potatoes and vegetables you’re going to serve with your Veal Cordon Bleus so they’ll be ready.  Here’s the Hollandaise Sauce recipe: 

(#298) MASTER HOLLANDAISE SAUCE


Yield: about 2.5-3 cups  / Mis-en-place: 30-45 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
8
Each
Egg yolks

2
Tablespoons
Cold water

2
Teaspoons
Lemon juice

2-3
Cups
Warm drawn butter

1
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.5
Teaspoon
Cayenne pepper

1
Teaspoon
Straight sherry




Method:

9.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! This is an easy yet temperamental sauce to make so pay strict attention to the instructions.  Use a metal bowl that will fit over a pot into which you will put boiling water (the bottom).  This sauce is easier to make using a bowl and pot rather than a Bain Marie or double-boiler.  Have the pot ready with steaming water but make sure that the bowl will NOT actually touch the water; you want the sauce to be cooked by the steam roiling up, NOT the water itself.

10. Beat the egg yolks with the cold water until frothy with a wire whisk.  Place the bowl over the pot, holding it with one hand and whisking like mad with the other.  Allow the steam to swirl up around the bowl and at first, the mixture will look liquid but then will begin to thicken and to expand after several minutes.  PAY ATTENTION TO THE BOTTOM OF THE BOWL: YOU DON’T WANT THE EGGS TO SCRAMBLE!

11. As you continue whisking, you will see it beginning to thicken and to expand but if you see any signs of scrambling, quickly remove the bowl from the pot, whisking all the while.  You need to keep whisking so that it becomes homogenous and so that NO damage is done: there’s nothing worse than having to do this over but sometimes at first, the novice will have to do it repeatedly until they obtain the “feel.”

12. When it’s thickened and somewhat creamy in appearance, whisk in the lemon juice.  Now, place the bowl inside another bowl into which you’ve placed a towel.  This will hold the bowl while you proceed to the next step: adding the liquid butter.

13. With one hand, begin dribbling in the drawn butter along the sides of the bowl while whisking steadily with the other.  This is an emulsified sauce that must be made by hand.  Continue adding butter and continue whisking until the sauce has either thickened or begun to separate: if it’s separating, STOP adding the butter and continue whisking like mad until it’s emulsified and then begin adding a bit more of the butter.  YOU CANNOT RUSH THIS PROCESS!

14. If it seems that the mixture can tolerate NO more butter, stop adding it.  When you have a somewhat thick velvety sauce, add the rest of the ingredients and taste it.  Readjust the seasonings as necessary and then congratulate yourself on a job well done.  Keep the sauce warm but never hot and never continue using after 60-90 minutes at most.  Begin fresh as it’s important to not keep it too long.  Eggs are one of the things that the organisms that cause foodborne illness love so never keep hollandaise sauce when you’re through with it. 

15. NOTE: Now the big problem with sauces of the Hollandaise family is holding temperature. Technically, anything in the danger zone (above 45° F and below 140° F is considered dangerous. But, you cannot hold these sauces at the temp because the heat will break the emulsion. Therefore, we set them close to the steam table to try to keep them warm and make more during the night as we can but that is not always easy. I’m telling you this just so that you as a consumer in the public know what’s up.

Anyhow, this is the basis for a great many more sauces of the Hollandaise Family as well as being a great sauce by itself.  You will find many uses for it and if you follow the directions explicitly, you’ll master it in no time.  The thing to remember is this: NEVER allow the egg mixture to actually touch the water—they’ll scramble in no time and the sauce will be ruined.  Here’s the Broken Glass Garnish:

(#1305) BROKEN GLASS GARNISH





Yield: about 1 cup / Mis-en-place: about 20 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
.25
Cup
3/16” square-cut carrots
Rinsed
.25
Cup
3/16” square-cut red cabbage
Rinsed
.25
Cup
3/16” square celery
Rinsed
.25
Cup
3/16” square cut red bell pepper
Rinsed



Method:

16. Rinse cabbage well, and then toss all ingreds together. Let them dry a little bit at room temp then keep on the cold line. I will tell you when to utilize this garnish which is a very attractive one; it reminds me of the stars in the heavens.

This is a very important garnish that you will use on all sorts of things so keep it available at all times. Here’s the final setup:

17. When everything is ready to serve, bring out FOUR attractive dinner plates and have them before you.  At the six o’clock position, place one serving of Veal Cordon Bleu. Then, at the 10 o’clock position, place one serving of vegetables and at the 2 o’clock position, place one serving of rice.  Pour the Hollandaise sauce over each cordon bleu and then dust with freshly minced parsley flakes and a sprinkle of Hungarian paprika.  Place a sprig of fresh parsley in the center of each plate and then sprinkle the Broken Glass Garnish around the rims of each plate and serve.

This is the great French dish as created by the great French Chef, Auguste Escoffier, 1846-1935, the master who is responsible for the classic French cuisine we’ve so idolized for the past century-and-a-half.  This is one of the all-time great dishes that once were found on almost every fine-dining restaurant menu just like its cousin, Chicken Cordon Bleu which utilizes a boneless breast of chicken.  Either one is perfect for a classy dinner so keep this recipe on hand: you’ll be using it many, many times!

Our next dish is one of the more recent ones created back in the day due to the sudden availability of all sorts of boneless game birds and animals.  There was a company back in the 1980’s called Night Bird that had virtually every sort of specialty meat and poultry item available to restaurants throughout the country.  Where I worked, we used a great many of the finer meats they had and this is one of our dishes:

(#1154) SAUTEED QUAIL SALINAS-STYLE



Yield:  4 servings  / Mis-en-place: 20 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
8
3-4-ounce
De-boned quail

2
Cups
Seasoned flour

.5
Cup
Drawn butter

1
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.75
Teaspoon
Minced garlic

.5
Teaspoon
White pepper

.5
Teaspoon
Ground thyme

1
Tablespoon
Triple sec

.125
Cup
Korbel brandy

.5
Cup
Drawn butter

1
Cup
Sliced button mushrooms

.25
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.125
Teaspoon
White pepper

.25
Teaspoon
Whole thyme

1
Cup
Orange juice

.5
Cup
Sauvignon blanc

.25
Cup
Gran Marnier orange liqueur

.5
Cup
Broccoli florets
Blanched
1
Cup
Julienned kumquats

.125
Cup
Kumquat juice

2
Teaspoons
Freshly minced parsley
Rinsed
Cornstarch slurry

3
Cups
Rice du jour

3
Cups
Vegetables du jour

4
Leaves
Butterleaf lettuce
Rinsed
4
Each
Orange moons

4
Each
Parsley sprigs
Rinsed
.125
Cup
Freshly minced parsley flakes
Rinsed



Method:

18. Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Preheat standard oven to 400°F or a convection oven—fan “on”—to 350°F.  Place a large skillet or two over medium flame and heat up.  Have the quail ready, rinsed, slightly-pressed.  Dust them in the seasoned flour, pressing on both sides, and then shaking off the excess. 

19. When the skillets are warm, spray them with PAM or with some such other food release spray and add the first measure of drawn butter.  Add the quail and add the first batch of seasonings, sprinkling them over all of the fowl.  Quickly brown them on each side and when you’ve turned them back up to the front side of the birds hit them with the triple sec and the brandy.  Allow them to flame up and then when it’s died down, place the pans inside the oven. 

20. Wipe out one of the skillets and add the second measure of drawn butter and return to the heat.  Add the mushrooms along with the second batch of seasonings and quickly sauté.  Then, add the orange juice, wine, and Gran Marnier.  Add the blanched broccoli florets and the julienned kumquats and juice.  Add the parsley flakes.  Bring to a high simmer and tighten it up with the cornstarch slurry, just to the point of being an attractive pan sauce and then bring out the quail.

21. The quail cook within 3-4 minutes and you can ascertain this by touching the breasts: do they feel firm? If so, they’re done and if not, add them to the skillet and boil for a minute.  Then, it’s time to serve them. 

22. Place a mound of rice on each of four serving plates and then top with two quail each.  Place the vegetables at the 11 o’clock and the butterleaf lettuce topped with an orange moon with a parsley sprig thrust through its center at the 2 o’clock.  Pour sauce with mushrooms over each pair of quail and then dust with parsley flakes and serve.

Here’s the Seasoned Flour recipe:

(#232) SEASONED FLOUR



1. About 2.5 cups:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2.5
Cups
All-purpose flour

1
Tablespoon
Cayenne pepper

1
Tablespoon
White pepper

1.5
Tablespoon
Hungarian paprika

1.5
Teaspoons
Granulated garlic

1
Tablespoon
Kosher salt

2
Teaspoons
Parsley flakes




Method:

1.      Combine all ingredients together and store in an airtight jar, baggie, or whatever else and either keep at room temperature or in your freezer until needed.

It’s important to have a seasoned flour recipe for breading different foods and this is a good one.  You will use this recipe many times.

This is a classic dish from the central valley of California.  Game birds are popular throughout the state and this is one of the classic recipes served at a country club in the area and also in Bakersfield, California. If you cannot find what you need at your local butcher’s please go online and find this site: http://www.vermontquail.com/store.html. Cavendish Game Birds online is an excellent place to purchase quail as are many other online outlets but this one is the best in my opinion!

---------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

Well, I do hope that both of today’s recipes have excited not only your taste buds but your imaginations as one is a classic and one is a more modern presentation and as far as I know looking at the END’s tags, the ONLY quail recipe here to date.  That to me is a spectacular accomplishment as it’s always a treat to be the first to get something on the menu.  I love quail and while they may not be the item on most people’s menus, it’s always a great thing to do something out of the ordinary.  JT was the first chef to do a recipe for Cornish Game Hens and I’m the first to do one on quail.  In fact, his was done earlier this year on the Valentine’s Day Menu and the blog post was on Wednesday, February 08, 2012, Special Menus XXXII. Be sure to check out Chef Tobiason’s Special Menu’s installment as I know his Valentine’s Day 2012 menu was phenomenal!  Sure, we’re all in competition with one another but we’re also close associates thanks to the marvelous thing Stinkbug has going here!          

   Anyhow, let us close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by HOT TUNA and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com—we want to make some money here so help us out by buying something!  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

Thank you!

Tiresias

Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus
CEC, CPC, ACF

This is me as a young chef at an awards dinner at the Bon Adventure hotel in the 1980's when I was working there as the Night Sous Chef's Assistant. I began cooking in the 1960's in my native Greece before moving to Los Angeles, California, in the early 1970's. I apprenticed under an ACF Master Chef shortly thereafter and now here I am. I still am involved in professional foodservice as an instructor.

---30---

The END Commentary for Wednesday, May 02, 2012 by Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus



.



Recipe created by Chef Tiresias Helenus Grinikeodopuloposlus on February 13, 1977 in Beverly Hills, CA.

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