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Monday, May 14, 2012

“Side Dish Seminar, Pt. XXII: Pommes de Tierre Magdalene—Mediterranean-style Scalloped Potatoes made with Tomato Juice hails from the South of France” by Chef Fritz Schlependrecht



We continue offering the discography of one of the all-time great San Francisco bands: HOT TUNA!  Their TWENTY-SECOND album—“Live in Japan”—was released in 1997 and was another excellent live album that showcased the band at its best!  We love this CD and urge you to go to Amazon.com where you’ll definitely want to buy it NOW!  Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.  




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Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 222 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!



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Chef Fritz Schlependrecht

END Commentary 05-15-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 1,382.



CULINARY POLITICS



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Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Tuesday, May 15, 2012 by Chef Fritz Schlependrecht

SIDE DISH SEMINAR, PT. XXII

 Side Dish Seminar, Pt. XXII: Pommes de Tierre Magdalene—Mediterranean-style Scalloped Potatoes made with Tomato Juice hails from the South of France” by Chef Fritz Schlependrecht



Bakersfield, CA, 05-15-2012 T: Greetings once again, my friends, I’m so happy to be back with you today and to continue our series on Side Dishes and Accompaniments.  As I mentioned to you yesterday, it’s a foolish thing to not take into account the importance of side dishes and in matching them to the entrée in the same way the sommelier would match a wine to the meal.  The worst thing to do is to throw things together in a hodgepodge of circumstances and then hope that it will all work out as though it were some sort of Picasso painting;. Yes, sometimes, a chef can demonstrate brilliance in taking the initiative and creating something new but many times the diners will look at the plate with skepticism doubting your sanity in what you combined together and then served them.  Not only will they leave the server a bum tip, they’ll go out and spread the word that your establishment is not worth visiting and you will lose your customers one-by-one.  If you aren’t sure what to do, go out and invest some money in cookbooks as nowadays what with Amazon.com, one of our sponsors here at the Elemental News of the Day, one can buy an entire library of culinary classics at a reasonable price and write it off if they’re a professional.  I have a culinary library at home that is worth $10,000 and got it for a quarter of that by going to Amazon rather than going to Barnes and Noble, Borders, or B. Dalton Bookseller—going there will deplete your wallet and drive you into bankruptcy, neither of which is attractive in this economy.

Our recipe for today is a magnificent, reddish scalloped potato dish, Pommes de Tierre Magdalene, a timeless treasure from the South of France.  What I find to be interesting is the way that the Columbian Exchange, the flow of new goods back and forth between Old and New Worlds thanks to the discovery by Christopher Columbus of the new foods that became established not only in Europe but as far away as Africa and Asia.  Potatoes are one such “discovery” that have become a part of virtually every cuisine around the world and would seem to have always been a part of the culture.  Our dish today is one such example as not only does it include potatoes in the makeup but also tomatoes, the second-most popular item to have flown eastward to Europe and beyond.  You’ll love this amazing dish:

POMMES DE TIERRE ALA MAGDALENE



Traditionally, France has two different styles of cookery: the Classic or Haute Cuisine as created by the great French Chef Auguste Escoffier (1846-1935) and others of his ilk and the South of France, Mediterranean-style cuisine that has more in common with Italy and Spain than with the cooking of the northern part of the country.  Both are much-loved forms of cuisine and this recipe hails from the Southern-style. 

The potatoes are sliced thin and then layered in loose rows in a baking dish and covered with a tomato-broth mixture.  They’re covered tightly with foil so that the steam remains within the pan and cooks the potatoes within the oven.  The end result is delicious and they’re excellent when paired with dishes from the same or similar cuisines.  Needless to say, this is an excellent albeit different dish so be creative and see where and when you can use it.

1. To Serve Four / Mis-en-place: 60-75 minutes.




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
3
Large
Russet potatoes, peeled and thinly-sliced; keep in acidulated water
7/8
Cup
Tomato juice

7/8
Cup
Chicken broth

.75
Teaspoons
Sweet basil

.25
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.125
Teaspoon
White pepper

.25
Teaspoon
Garlic powder

.25
Teaspoon
Whole thyme

2
Teaspoons
Freshly minced parsley

.75
Cup
Yellow onions, sliced paper-thin

.5
Cup
Sliced button mushrooms




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready. Preheat standard oven to 425°F or a convection oven to 375°F.

2.      Combine together the next EIGHT ingredients listed in a bowl.  Have mushrooms and onions ready to work with, too.

3.      Remove the potatoes from the acidulated water and pat dry with a couple of towels.  Spray a baking dish with PAM or some such other food release spray and then arrange the potato slices in a 2-3 loose rows.  Pour the juice-broth mixture over the potatoes followed by the mushrooms and finally, the shredded onions scattered all across the top.  Shake the baking dish gently to settle the contents.

4.      Spray a piece of foil with PAM that’s large enough to cover the pan and to obtain an airtight seal.  Place the pan inside your preheated oven and bake 1-1.25 hours or until the potatoes are tender when tested with a fork.  When they’re done, remove them from the oven and serve immediately.

5.      Note: Potatoes Magdalene are perfect for Mediterranean-style dishes such as lamb or chicken that hail from the Middle East. Always a fan favorite, this is a classic dish that always brings smiles to the faces of your diners.

Note that leftovers must always be cooled to below 45°F as quickly as possible and then covered with plastic wrap and refrigerated.  Always label, date, and refrigerate and be sure to reheat leftovers to 165°F or higher and if need be, add additional liquid to the reheats so that they can reabsorb the moisture.

--------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

Our dish for today was an exciting one or so I believe and I do believe that each and every one of you will have been enamored of it once it’s been made.  It may seem somewhat peculiar but one has to view it within the cuisine from which it hails—the South of France cookery—to appreciate it as otherwise, it seems like an odd item that one wouldn’t use except for very specific purposes.  I understand that so I would suggest on maybe investing some money in books by Julia Child on French Cuisine, she’s the undisputed master as far as I am concerned. Check her out!             

Anyhow, let us close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by HOT TUNA and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com—we want to make some money here so help us out by buying something!  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

Thank you, my friends!

Chef Fritz

Chef Fritz Schlependrecht

American Culinary Federation, Inc., CMC

This is me in 1985 at an American Culinary Convention back in 1987 taken as a collage of sorts.  I began my culinary career at age 10 working under my father, Chef Fritz, Sr., at his German restaurant in Southern California.  I moved to Bakersfield in 1982 and went to work at one of the hotels and remained there for the next 24 years prior to retiring.  Now, I spend my time writing culinary articles for various magazines enjoying the good life.  I’ve dedicated my entire lifetime to promoting the foodservice industry and in educating the young folks.

---30---

The END Commentary for Tuesday, May 15, 2012 by Chef Fritz Schlependrecht



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef Fritz Schlependrecht



Recipe created by Chef Fritz Schlependrecht on August 28, 1986 in Oildale, CA.

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This is #1362 an 11” x 14" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Kern Canyon." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

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