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Tuesday, April 3, 2012

“Special Menus, Pt. XLV: ‘Easter Sunday Dinner Menu, Pt. III: Famous Restaurant Recipes featuring Roast Prime Rib with Accompaniments and French Cuisine at its Best—Salmon Richelieu” by Chef Brian Craig Carrick



Today, we continue presenting albums by the Strawberry Alarm Clock!  Their SECOND album—“Wake Up…It’s Tomorrow”—was released in 1968 and was their second-best album ever!  We love the OLD psychedelic bands from the olden days and believe that our readership does, too.  We want you to continue visiting Amazon.com where you’ll find these long lost gems. You’ll definitely want to buy this one NOW!  [Unfortunately, the link may no longer be possible due to the fact that the Amazon.com Associates’ Program’s status is up in the air due to the fact that our home base is in California—you can still go there and BUY it!] Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.







                                                                                  
Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 263 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!






EASTER 2012 WEEK!

                                                                                     

STINKBUG 2012

                                                                                   





Chef Brian Craig Carrick

END Commentary 04-04-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 3,306.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Wednesday, April 04, 2012 by Chef Brian Craig Carrick

SPECIAL MENUS INDEX, PT. XLV

 Special Menus, Pt. XLV: ‘Easter Sunday Dinner Menu, Pt. III: Famous Restaurant Recipes featuring Roast Prime Rib with Accompaniments and French Cuisine at its Best—Salmon Richelieu” by Chef Brian Craig Carrick



Bakersfield, CA, 04-04-2012 W: Here it is, the Wednesday prior to Easter Sunday which means tomorrow is Holy Thursday, then it’s Good Friday, then its Holy Saturday, and finally Easter on Sunday.  I hope that all of you will be attending church services and will be doing all the right things you need to do to make this a great holiday for your customers, your family, and for the less fortunate in your community.  We always try to do the right thing for the disadvantaged and that is my wife’s job, primarily, working with those in need of government aid.  She is an angel among angels and I love this woman very, very much.

Something else I have to share with you is that today marks our 498th blog post at the NEW Elemental News of the Day which means, I will be here to celebrate our 500th post in two days.  That is quite an honor and I am excited about being the one to do it.  If we were more successful, we could have some sort of celebration where we could give away trips to Paris and Vienna and to the other culinary capitals of Europe but we’re unable to do so, being as small as we are.  Still, we hope to one day to be able to have a fantastic 1000th celebration in another 1.75 years or so.  It is a hard slog coming here and banging out posts to an audience we never see, never hear from, never pay attention to anything we do or say.  Still, I have faith that we will become the NUMBER ONE foodservice blog on the Internet and we beg you to tell your friends, family, co-workers, relatives, business associates, and whoever else is in your sphere of influence to join us! We want you!

Here’s our menu:

EASTER SUNDAY MENU 2012

I.                  Brian’s Spring Salad

II.               Kern County Salad

III.           Asparagus Salad

IV.           Cream of Rutabaga Soup

V.               Cream of Carrot-Parsnip Soup

VI.           Roast Prime Rib with Au Jus and Yorkshire Pudding

VII.        Baked Salmon ala Richelieu

VIII.    Roasted Red Jacket Potatoes

IX.           Pilaf Savoyarde  

X.               Candied Parsnips  

XI.           Glazed Banana Squash  

XII.        Poppyseed Muffins  

XIII.    Pina-Colada Muffins  

XIV.    Boysenberry Shortcake with Whipped Cream  

Easter Orange Cake

We will commence with our prime rib recipe and then segue into the salmon recipe, both of these will be memorable meals for your guests whether they are at a hotel or at a home.  Both of them are time-honored classics; tomorrow, we will begin the side dishes.  Let us begin:   

(#1356) ROAST PRIME RIB WITH YORKSHIRE PUDDING





Yield:  8 + servings  / Mis-en-place: 2 days + / 2-4 hours:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
Prime Rib Seasoning #1 (#230)
1
Cup
Worcestershire sauce

1
Cup
Freshly minced garlic

.5
Cup
Kosher salt

.125
Cup
Cracked black pepper

The Prime Rib:
1
7-8 #
Standing rib roast (with the bones)
Prime or Choice
2
#
Rock salt

Carrot, celery, yellow onion, and leek scraps

Yorkshire Pudding:
3
Cups
Whole milk

6
Each
Large AAA eggs, separated

1.5
Teaspoons
Kosher salt

1
Tablespoon
Baking powder

3
Cups
All-purpose flour

.5-1
Cup
Beef drippings

The Finish:
1
Bunch
Parsley sprigs
Rinsed
.25
Cup
Freshly minced parsley flakes
Rinsed



Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Prime Rib Seasoning: Mix everything together and store in the refrigerator in a sanitized airtight container.  Use it to marinate prime rib you will cook two days’ hence in order to instill deep flavor throughout the meat.  Be sure to poke multiple times with a kitchen fork so that the seasonings can penetrate to the center of the meat.  Then as the rib cooks, baste it with the drippings that result from the mixing of the marinade and the natural juices.

To cook the Rib Roast properly, follow the Roasting Chart:

ROASTING CHART

ROAST:                    DONENESS:                        MINUTES PER POUND:

                                                                        500°F             500°F             325°F

                                                                                                350°F

Standing Rib:           Rare                                               15                   

                                    Medium                                         20                    25

                                    Well-done                                     25                    30

Rib-eye:                    Rare                           10                    15                   

                                    Medium                     15                    20                    25

                                    Well-done                 20                    30                    30

Tenderloin:              Rare                           7                                         

                                    Medium                     10                                       

                                    Well-done                                                        

Sirloin Tip/

Eye of Round           Rare                           7                      8                     

                                    Medium                     10                                       

                                    Well-done                                                         25

Rump                         Rare                           7                      12                   

                                    Medium                                         15                    20

                                    Well-done                                                         25

Chuck/ top

Round/ bottom

Round                        Rare                                                                  

                                    Medium                                                             30

                                    Well-done                                                         35

Some meats are never meant to be cooked well-done like the tenderloin whereas others like the chuck, top-and-bottom rounds should never be cooked rare.  The idea is that each cut needs to be cooked at certain temperatures for certain time frames PER POUND for best results.  So, each cut may not need to be cooked at one temperature (low or high) or at a combination (15 minutes at 500°F, 15 minutes at 350°F, and then the rest of the way at the lower temperature per pound).  If you have a higher temperature, that is what you begin with for whatever minutes are specified and then go to the next and the one after that if it applies and figure your time by the time per pound.  That is how you use the chart.

2.      Heat the standard oven to 500°F or a convection oven—fan “on”—to 450°F.  Place the rib into a deep pan with a couple of pounds of rock salt heaped up in it and pile the vegetable scraps around it. When the oven’s hot, place the roast within it on the middle oven rack and cook for FIFTEEN MINUTES at the high temperature; then, drop the heat to 350°F (300°F convection) and continue roasting another 1.5 hours or so until the meat is 140°F which is classed as “rare;” however, to be on the safe side, pull it out at 135°F as it will continue roasting—outside the oven—for another 15 minutes or so which would make closer to medium than rare.  However, if you want it cooked more than that, follow the chart.  When it’s done, pull it out and make the au jus (without the addition of the Floating Island or make it at an earlier time using beef bones—it’s up to you) and the Yorkshire pudding.

3.      Note: 135°F to 140°F is rare; 141°F to 145°F is medium-rare to medium; 146°F to 150°F is medium to medium-well; and 151°F to 160°F is medium-well at the lower end to well-done on the higher end. BE AWARE!

This is the recipe for au jus:

(#216) STANDARD AU JUS





Yield:  2.5 quarts / Mis-en-place: 2-3 hours:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
Gallon
Beef stock

3.5
Ounces
Better-than-Bouillon beef base

1
Cup
Worcestershire sauce

1
Each
White onion, peeled and chopped

2
Cups
Chopped celery

1
Medium
Carrot, chopped

.5
Cup
Garlic cloves

2
Teaspoons
Whole thyme

2
Each
Bay leaves

Floating Island (see below)




Method:

4.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work!

5.      Combine the first NINE ingredients together in a large saucepot and place over a medium flame; bring to a boil and once there, drop the flame to LOW.  Prepare the Floating Island by doing the following:

(#212) FLOATING ISLAND



This is the method you use whenever you wish to clarify a stock or broth.  The “floating island” floats on the top of the stock and collects all of the impurities that float up and attach themselves to it.  It seems kind of strange but this is how they do it in classical cooking. Give it a shot the next time you wish to make a stock into a consommé.

Method:

6.      Separate egg whites from yolks using them somewhere else. As for the whites, beat them till they’re stiff (meringue) on an electric mixer. Then, spread them across the top of the stock and leave it on the lowest flame possible and allow sitting another 1-2 hours.

7.      The “floating island” will then collect any more particular matter as it floats towards the top. When time’s up, scrape it off the top and re-strain the stock- you’ll have perfection.

This is one that every cook or chef needs to have on hand in their recipe books as it is essential to making consommé-quality stocks.

8.      Follow the recipe as outlined above.  When the stock has reduced to about 2.5 quarts, remove the floating island with a skimmer and discard it.  Then, strain the au jus through a double-chinois lined with a towel to remove any other residual impurities and debris.  Finally, strain this purified stock through the chinois lined with wax paper and by the end of this procedure, you should have a clear, beef stock that is perfect.  Should you wish to season it still more, you can but if you use the drippings from a prime rib as part of the beginning measure of beef broth, you will have a very tasty au jus that will flavor your meats beyond description.

This is the classic method for preparing top-quality au jus which is as described, consommé-quality.  It is the perfect accompaniment for all dishes requiring au jus and this one is the best accompaniment to a perfectly-cooked prime rib or standing rib roast.

9.      The Yorkshire pudding: beat the separated eggs—one group at a time in a clean, DRY mixing bowl—set aside.  Then to the mixing bowl, add the milk, salt, and the whipped egg whites and beaten yolks and blend together on low speed.  Sift the flour and baking powder together and then blend into the mixture in the mixing bowl, blending well.  Pour the reserved beef drippings into a baking dish and pour in the batter which should be quite creamy and place it in the oven. Bake for at least 45-60 minutes or until it has set up.  If the meat is close to the temperature you want it to be, remove it from the oven and keep it warm and raise the oven temperature to 450°F (standard oven) or 400°F (convection oven—fan “on”).

10. To serve: bring the prime rib to the table and accompany it with the Yorkshire Pudding and au jus.  Be sure to garnish it with fresh parsley sprigs and to dust it with freshly minced parsley flakes. Always serve a slice of prime rib with the bone ON!  It is traditional to accompany your prime rib with Horseradish Sauce:

(#336) HORSERADISH SAUCE





Yield:  about 3.5 cups / Mis-en-place: 20-25 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1.5
Cups
Milk

1.5
Cups
Hot beef stock

3
Tablespoons
Melted butter

3/8
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.25
Teaspoon
White pepper

3.5
Tablespoons
All-purpose flour

2.25
Teaspoons
Horseradish

3/8
Cup
Chopped pimientos, dried beforehand

3/8
Teaspoon
Freshly minced parsley rinsed and dried

1
Each
Bay leaf




Method:

11. Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Combine the milk and beef stock in a saucepot and place over medium-high heat. In another saucepot sprayed with PAM or some such other food release spray, combine the melted butter, salt, pepper, and all-purpose flour.  Blend well to form a blond roux and cook over medium-heat, stirring almost constantly, until thickened, somewhat light, and hot.

12. Bring the liquid to a boil and then whisk it into the roux—FURIOUSLY!—until the liquid has reared up and is boiling hard and fast. Continue whisking for 2-3 minutes and then lower the heat to low and allow it to perk over a very low flame.

13. After about 5-6 minutes, add the remaining ingredients and blend well.  Allow it to cook for another 4-5 minutes and then remove from the flame and transfer to a sauceboat for service at the table.

This is the way to make the most fantastic prime rib you’ve ever made.  Sure, it’s time consuming but each and every day in a restaurant, this is the normal process.  It’s best to roast it at lower temperatures so you can avoid a lot of shrinkage so follow the chart and things will work out.  Always be sure to use a quick-temp thermometer so you can immediately gauge the temperature of the meat as this will save you from having to make a lot of excuses.  There is nothing worse than having to explain to either customers or friends and family WHY the meat is overcooked—don’t let this happen to you!

Here’s the salmon recipe: be sure to use ONLY the best!

(#1357) BAKED SALMON RICHELIEU





Yield:  8 servings  / Mis-en-place: 20 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
8
7-8-ounce
Salmon fletches with the skin on

Lemon-and-Pepper Seasoning

Lawrey’s seasoned salt

Lawrey’s seasoned pepper

Vegetable oil

1
Bunch
Fresh sorrel
Cleaned
2
Cups
Chardonnay

.125
Cup
Freshly minced parsley flakes
Rinsed
8
Each
Lemon rounds

8
Each
Fresh sprigs of parsley
Rinsed



Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Preheat your standard oven to 375°F or your convection oven to 325°F.  Spray a sheet pan with PAM or with some such other food release spray. 

2.      Place the salmon fletches upon it and baste with oil.  Season heavily with the listed spices and then lay the sorrel leaves across each fletch.  Place the pan inside the oven and bake for about 10-15 minutes or until the fish has firmed to the touch and shows signs of whiteness—this is the fat coming to the surface.  The color will dim just a bit and the fish will feel very firm. During the time it’s in there, baste it with the chardonnay until it’s all used up.

3.      When the fish is done, bring it out of the oven and place one fletches upon each of eight dinner plates.  Garnish with a lemon moon and a sprig of parsley and dust with freshly minced parsley.  Accompany with tartar sauce and side dishes of your choice and enjoy.

This is a simple yet classy way of presenting fresh salmon, found in fine-dining establishments most of the time.  It can be basted with heavy cream, too, if one so desires but I prefer the down-to-earth, flavorful way of just fish and sorrel. Enjoy!

Here’s a bonus recipe for tartar sauce:

(#398) TARTAR SAUCE #3





Yield:  3.25 cups / Mis-en-place: 3-4 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2.5
Cups
Mayonnaise

.25
Cup
Dill relish

.25
Cup
Capers w/ juice

.25
Cup
Minced yellow onions, blanched

1
Tablespoon
Freshly minced parsley

1.5
Teaspoons
Lemon juice

2
Teaspoons
Kosher salt

1
Teaspoon 
White pepper




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work!

2.      Combine everything with the use of an electric mixer equipped with a whip attachment taking care to scrape the sides several times during the mixing process.  Store the tartar sauce in a sanitized airtight container for no more than 14 days in the refrigerator.  After that time, discard it and start fresh.  Always be sure to scrape the sides of the container after use so that harmful bacteria won’t be able to form its sides.  Always label, date, and refrigerate!

This is a good tartar sauce that is more advanced than some and simpler than others.  It is tasty and will do the job.

---------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

I feel guilty saying this but tomorrow is our Hump Day and I am excited.  I know, I know I have just come back from being gone for five months and yes, I should be happy to be back completely.  But I am also thinking about retiring and spending my time traveling about the country with the Lovely Lady Linda seeing the great sights there are to see before the current administration turns us into a communist police state.  I think we need to be very vigilant because too many things are going to happen this fall or are said to be going to happen that it means something WILL happen.  Whether it’s the End of Days or the Second Term of Barack Obama, something is going to happen because this is portentous year of sorts. How many of us can say we were alive during one of the most critical times of the nation, let alone the world?  Nothing is guaranteed, my friends, who knows what lurks out there in outer space, stuff is flying around all over the place and black holes are gobbling up entire universes elsewhere in the galaxy.  All I know is that I go to church as much as possible and keep in touch with God and ask forgiveness for all of the terrible things I did earlier in my life when I was an alcoholic and a drug-addled chef.  Yes, I had a great life and I’ve probably been with more women than the regular guy but that was then and this is now and I am sorry for all those I hurt along the way.   

I hope you’ve enjoyed our installment for today, the prime rib is a classic piece of meat that needs to be treated very gently as it’s a total waste if you burn the damned thing up.  Too many times, I’ve seen young cooks working banquets overdo the prime rib on a big Christmas party and the head chef fire them on the spot.  The head chef was lucky that HE wasn’t fired on the spot because in the end, he (or she) has to answer for their subordinates.  It’s a difficult industry, it’s like the first time I dropped a lobster on the floor and was going to toss it into the garbage and the chef slapped me across the face and asked me what the hell I was doing?  “YOU NEVER THROW A LOBSTER OUT, WASH IT OFF, AND PUT IT BACK ON THE PLATE, YOU IMBECILE!” Whoa, what a lesson, I assure you, but I learned extremely fast.

 Anyhow, let us close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by the Strawberry Alarm Clock and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com—we want to make some money here so help us out by buying something!  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

Thank you, my friends!

Brian Carrick

Brian Carrick

American Culinary Federation, Inc., Retired Member


This is me in 1985 at a Chefs de Cuisine of Greater Bakersfield dinner in Bakersfield, CA, at one of our participating member's foodservice establishments. I began my culinary career in 1969 bussing tables at age 12 and became a cook's apprentice in 1973 at age 17. I’ve worked all over California, Hawaii, Washington State, and even a short time in Arizona.  I am retired at the present time due to multiple disabilities.  I presently live in Bakersfield, CA, with my lovely new wife, the Lady Linda.

---30---

The END Commentary for Wednesday, April 04, 2012 by Chef Brian Craig Carrick



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef Brian Craig Carrick

.



Recipe created by Chef Brian Craig Carrick on November 17, 1973 in Bakersfield, CA.

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STINKBUG AT THE COUNTDOWN TO THE END DAYS


                                                                                                                                                              
                                                                               
This is #1279 a 12” x 16" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Shoe Sale.’" It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

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1 comment:


  1. If you want to learn how to make perfect prime rib and Yorkshire pudding, baby, this is the frigging place. We always do our best to share the best in food so why not come along with us and learn how to do thing the way the Lord intended us to do them. Thanks! Chef Craig “Stinkbug” Carrici of the American Institute of Culinary Politics-Elemental News of the Day!

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