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Thursday, April 19, 2012

“Famous Restaurant Recipes, Pt. XLV: ‘Shrimp Denise—Jumbo Shrimp wrapped with Bacon served amidst a Pool of Brown Sauce—Country Club Cookery at its Best” by Chef El Chilote



Today, we continue offering albums by one of the all-time great San Francisco bands that had so much promise but then basically fell apart due to the usual reasons: MOBY GRAPE!  Their TWELFTH album—“Crosstalk: the Best of Moby Grape”—was released in 2004 and was an excellent compilation of this underdog San Francisco psychedelic band, well-worth buying. By all means, please go to Amazon.com where you’ll definitely want to buy it NOW!  Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.





COUNTDOWN TO THE END OF THE MAYAN CALENDAR…


                                                                             

Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 247 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!





                                                                                           


STINKBUG 2012


                                                                                  


Chef El Chilote

END Commentary 04-20-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,226.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Friday, April 20, 2012 by Chef El Chilote

FAMOUS RESTAURANT RECIPES, PT. XLV

 Famous Restaurant Recipes, Pt. XLV: ‘Shrimp Denise—Jumbo Shrimp wrapped with Bacon served amidst a Pool of Brown Sauce—Country Club Cookery at its Best” by Chef El Chilote



Bakersfield, CA, 04-20-2012 F: I have for you today a great dish I learned how to make many years ago at a country club in the Bay Area, one of the best, perhaps of anywhere I’ve ever been in my life.  This dish was made with fresh prawns that were flown in on a daily basis from Mexican waters so their flavor was amazing, simply amazing.  There is something to be said about the enjoyment of shrimp, especially nowadays that we’ve had the oil disaster we’ve had in the Gulf that has left our native shellfish industry in tatters, you really come to appreciate what you suddenly cannot get at a decent price any longer.  That’s not to say that I didn’t appreciate prawns back in the day but back in the day, shrimp scampi and other assorted seafood and shellfish dishes were not as costly as they are now.  Now, they’re creeping up into the low-cost realm of cheap lobster tails or slipper lobsters and by this time in another 2-3 years, may almost become impossible to find much like abalone, a once-popular staple along the coastlines of California.  

Our dish for today is a jumbo prawn wrapped in tasty bacon and then baked in the oven after having been sautéed like scampi.   Garlic and shrimp go together and when bacon is tossed into the mix, it becomes even better and this dish is served with veal demi-glace in the restaurant but at home, you can use a brown sauce mix or make your own from scratch.  This dish is obviously something you would have guests over for dinner and not something you would do for Friday night fish night.  But, once you’ve made it, you’ll see what I mean.  Let’s make this bad boy:

(#1225) SHRIMP DENISE


                                                                                 


Yield:  4 servings / Mis-en-place: sauce: 12-16 hours / Cooking time: 15-20 minutes. 




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
16
Each
U-10 Prawns, peeled and deveined

1
Cup
Drawn butter

.125
Cup
Minced garlic

.25
Cup
Minced chives

.5
Cup
Sliced mushrooms

1
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.5
Teaspoon
White pepper

2
Teaspoons
Spanish paprika

.5
Cup
Chablis

16
Strips
Bacon, cooked medium-rare;

1.5-2
Cups
Demi-glace or Sauce Brune
See below
4
Each
Lemon crowns

4
Each
Sprigs fresh parsley

1
Quart
Rice of choice

1
Quart
Vegetables of choice

1.5-2
Cups
Broken Glass Garnish



                    
                                                                              
Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! First of all, you will need to make your sauce and note that agreeable store-bought products are available such as Knorr-Suisse Demi-glace sauce.  If at home, you can either make your sauce from scratch if you seek authenticity or you can use a brown gravy mix and spike it with some wine and extra seasonings.  Here is the basic sauce:

(#253) SAUCE BRUNE





Yield:  one quart / Mis-en-place: 12-16 hours:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2
Quarts 
Superior Veal stock

.25
Cup
Reserved beef drippings

3/8
Cup
All-purpose flour

2
Teaspoons
Kosher salt

1
Teaspoon
White pepper

1
Each
Bay leaf




Method:

2.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Make stock from beef or veal bones.  Roast the bones in a 375°F standard oven or a 325°F convection oven—fan “on”—for at least two hours; be sure to add some vegetable oil and some vegetable scraps such as yellow onions, celery, leeks, and carrots.  Turn the bones over while they cook, taking great care to scrape up the caramelized deposits on the pan’s bottom.  When the bones are dark, pour off and strain the oil and reserve it; place the pot over a medium flame and cover with water.  Bring to a boil, keep there for 4-5 minutes, and then reduce the flame to very low and simmer the bones for an hour or so.  If you start with 5# of bones, cover them with a gallon of cold water and reduce it by half.

3.      When the stock has been created, pour it through cheesecloth-lined fine-meshed sieve into a sanitized bowl.  Refrigerate overnight (the reserved oil, too) and the next day, scrape off the fat cap on the surface of the stock.  Combine this with the reserved oil and heat it up: when it’s liquid, pour it through a strainer and remove the impurities—discard them.  Save this oil in a clean jar in your freezer after you’ve taken out the required .25-cup for the roux.

4.      Combine the oil with the flour in a small saucepot and cook over a very low flame until its dark brown, stirring frequently.  Meanwhile, place two quarts of the beef or veal stock in a large saucepot and reduce by half over a medium flame.  Add the bay leaf and the seasonings to it while you do this. 

5.      When you have ONE quart of liquid, whisk the liquid into the roux pot; raise the temperature so that it’s boiling and whisk furiously as you combine the mixture.  Allow it to boil for 1-2 minutes and then reduce the heat and allow it to simmer over a very low flame for 4-5 minutes.  Check and readjust the seasonings as necessary.  Use this as your basic Brown Sauce or Sauce Brune.

This is the basic brown sauce from which many others are built.  Always be sure to create a DARK roux for brown sauces and either a white or a blonde roux for lighter sauces.  You can keep this in the refrigerator or in your freezer for 1-2 weeks and then must discard it.

We continue now with the Shrimp Denise directions:

6.      Be sure your jumbo prawns are peeled and deveined and by deveined, I mean, open them up with a paring knife about one-third of the way and scoop out all of the accumulated waste along the back side of each shrimp.  Don’t cut them all of the way open as this dish is meant to be one in which whole prawns are served.  Remove the shells and either discard them or save for use in making shellfish stock.

7.      Place a large sauté pan over a medium flame on the stovetop and when it’s warm, add the drawn butter, the prawns, garlic, chives, mushrooms, salt, pepper, and paprika.  Sauté as though cooking scampi, tossing about so that all sides are cooked and the shrimp are colored by the paprika.  When the liquid has almost reduced to nothing, add the Chablis and deglaze the pan.

8.      Again, allow the pan liquid to reduce to almost nothing and then remove it from the stove.  Remove the shrimp and place them onto a cutting board.  Return the pan to the stove atop a low flame and add the prepared brown sauce to the residual pan liquid and heat.  Meanwhile, turn a standard oven on to 400°F or a convection oven to 350°F with the fan “on.”

9.      Wrap each prawn with a strip of medium-rare-cooked bacon and secure it with a toothpick.  Place the prawns upon a sheet pan or in a skillet and place inside the hot oven.  Cook for 10-12 minutes or until the shrimp are reddish-white and firm to the touch.  Remove them from the oven and prepare to serve.

10.  On each of four dinner plates, ladle a pool of brown sauce at the six o’clock position and then place four prawns on their sides facing to the right in a row upon each plate. Spoon a portion of rice at the 2 o’clock position and the vegetables at the 10 o’clock.  Place a lemon crown in the middle of the plate with a parsley sprig inserted into its middle.  Then, sprinkle the Broken Glass Garnish around the edges of each plate so that they have a decorative rim with a beautiful presentation within its borders; then, it’s time to serve.

This is your Broken Glass Garnish:

(#1305) BROKEN GLASS GARNISH





Yield: about 1 cup / Mis-en-place: about 20 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
.25
Cup
3/16” square-cut carrots
Rinsed
.25
Cup
3/16” square-cut red cabbage
Rinsed
.25
Cup
3/16” square celery
Rinsed
.25
Cup
3/16” square cut red bell pepper
Rinsed



Method:

1.      Rinse cabbage well, and then toss all ingreds together. Let them dry a little bit at room temp then keep on the cold line. I will tell you when to utilize this garnish which is a very attractive one; it reminds me of the stars in the heavens.

This is a very important garnish that you will use on all sorts of things so keep it available at all times.

This is a wonderful way to serve jumbo prawns and was always a big seller at the country club in which I worked in the 1980’s.  People loved seeing those big U-10 prawns in front of them, they were so big, and the customers were stunned!

I love fixing this dish, to me, it is one of the most unique, delicious dishes I’ve ever had the pleasure of making and I believe that you’ll be sure to add it to your personal recipe books, too, so be sure to copy it off of your computer.  You can also write us for individual recipes at the cost of $5.00 each plus shipping and handling.  Please write to our PO Box address at the end of the blog; thank you!

---------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

I have heard many compliments about this week’s choice of recipes and I’m flattered that all of the mail that has come in to the post office box has been 100% positive and have asked for more.  Seafood is America’s passion, not Carl’s Junior, Taco Bell, or the wiener joint.  People don’t want to eat at Long John Silver’s where they get 90% batter or breading to 10% seafood product.  People want to eat the real thing and that is certainly NOT going to be found at the “I seafood differently” place, the Red Lobster.  Sure, those places are fine to take grandma on Mother’s Day (not the fast food places!) but for fine-dining, I scoff at the Olive Garden, the Red Lobster, and Romano’s Macaroni Grill: good God, do people really think that that’s gourmet cooking?  Well, probably so, if I use the young folks I see walking down the street, every single one of them imitating the dudes in the band Coldplay.  Restaurants have become chain operations and that means the independents have fallen on hard times which is a tragic fact of life for me.  I urge every single one of you to go out to eat at a REAL restaurant tonight!   

 Two more days to go, my friends, so I will have to find two more interesting dishes with which to tickle your taste buds, probably more shrimp, possibly scalone (which is the modern-day abalone), and who knows—maybe something more unique like a classic, old-time dish such as Newburg.  I’m always on the search for new and different things or perusing my 45-year old cookbooks looking for things I did 40 years ago.  That is the wonderful thing about cookery; it allows us to utilize old things and to transform them into brand-new and electrifying dishes.

 Anyhow, let us close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by MOBY GRAPE and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com—we want to make some money here so help us out by buying something!  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

Muchas gracias, buen amigos!

El Chilote

Santanamos “El Chilote” De Soto

CWC, ACF, Maui Chefs’ Society, Washington State Chefs’ Association.

__________________________________________________________________

This is a shot of me taken when I was a young cook back in the early 1960's. I served underneath a Master Chef for many years before striking out on my own. I went up the coast of the Western United States and Canada, working all the way until I made it to Alaska. From there, I moved to Hawaii for a couple of years (1994-1997) before I returned to Washington State in 1998 and it was there that I met Stinkbug.

---30---

The END Commentary for Friday, April 20, 2012 by Chef El Chilote



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef El Chilote

.



Recipe created by Chef El Chilote on November 29, 1981 in San Francisco, CA.

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This is #1123 an 18” x 24" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “The Covey.’" It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

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El Chilote, Famous Restaurant Recipes, Jumbo Prawns, Seafood, Country Club Cuisine, Moby Grape, Fine-dining, Gourmet Cooking, Shrimp, Fish and Shellfish, High-priced Entrees, Delicious Dishes, the Sauté Chef,








                                                                                 

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