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Friday, March 23, 2012

“Yeast Bread Seminar, Pt. XXX: ‘Spinach Rolls feature a Classic White Dough interspersed with Flakes of Green Spinach—too Delicious to be True’ by Chef Pedro R. Munoz”



As with the past twelve days, we’ve been presenting the Doors to you for your listening enjoyment and now that we’ve completed their official albums, we enter the realm of the long-lost live treasure trove of albums that was always said not to exist when suddenly, they started coming out!  Their THIRTY-FOURTH album—“Live in Boston”—was released in 2005 and was another great retrospective live album by one of rock’s greatest bands ever!  You’ll definitely want to buy this one NOW!  [Unfortunately, the link may no longer be possible due to the fact that the Amazon.com Associates’ Program’s status is up in the air due to the fact that our home base is in California—you can still go there and BUY it!] Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.


                                                                                  




Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 274 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!




                                                                                      



STINKBUG 2012



                                                                                     



Chef Pedro R. Munoz

END Commentary 03-24-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,636.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Saturday, March 24, 2012 by Chef Pedro R. Munoz

YEAST BREAD SEMINAR, PT. XXX

 Yeast Bread Seminar, Pt. XXX: ‘Spinach Rolls feature a Classic White Dough interspersed with Flakes of Green Spinach—too Delicious to be True’ by Chef Pedro R. Munoz



Bakersfield, CA, 03-24-2012 S: Buenos Dias, mis amigos, I hope your Saturday morning is going well here at midnight when our blogs are posted! I’m not up at this time, I can assure you but we post every night at 11:59 P.M. of the preceding day so that when midnight rolls around, we’re there waiting for you!  We are the fastest growing foodservice blog on the Internet, never forget that and one day we will be the number one source of foodservice information, more so than any of the other links we’ve got posted here on our blog.  We are presently working on a website of our own and hope to have it up-and-running prior to the “end of days” when December 21, 2011 rolls around.  It’s so sad that we will miss Christmas this year, if the end does come.  I do believe the Mayans were on to something but then; I have to disclaim it as I did yesterday because to believe in the end like Stinkbug does is sort of silly, if you ask me.  But then, he’s the boss and as our ticker proclaims it, we have 274 days from today until everything comes to an end so I am busy stocking up on tequila for the dire times to come in case it’s no longer available.

Our rolls for today are a fantastic one, Spinach Rolls, made with fresh spinach using the same dough more or less as all the rest.  The basic dough is a great one; it can be transformed into a wide variety of different breads with the addition or subtraction of ingredients.   But the standard ones—eggs, oil, sweeteners, bread flour—are all there.  Oh, we must add salt to the list, too, as that is the one essential ingredient that can never be left out of the formula.  Why, you ask? Well, salt is the regulator of gluten and without it, yeast breads will rise uncontrollably and will tear apart.  Once in awhile in the early days, I made some dreadful errors and omitted it just as I did baking powder on occasion in quickbreads for some horrific results.  I remember an Edgar Rice Burroughs’s “John Carter of Mars” series book in which some sort of monster could expand and reproduce in all sorts of horrible shapes without stop and of John Carter’s battles with it.  It always made me think of a dough that lacked salt and rose and tore apart much to my dismay as a young baker.  Now, I can laugh about it but at the time—and with the chef watching—I had to explain my error and be humiliated so NEVER omit salt.  It can be done in salt-free breads but it requires a special formula and some knowledge before one can proceed.  Maybe one day, we’ll make it.

Spinach dough is a good one, it’s one you will enjoy for as long as you bake bread and it’s also a good outlet to rid oneself of old product which in professional foodservice is a daily issue.  We throw spinach into soups—cream soups, vegetable soups, minestrones—and we can also use it in scrambles and omelets at breakfast time or in breads such as today.  Let’s get this show on the road, shall we?

(#120) SPINACH ROLLS





Yield:  about eighteen 1.75-to-2-ounce rolls    / Mis-en-place: 1.25 to 1.5 hours:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2
Ounces
Fresh spinach

2
Cups
Boiling water

.125
Cup
Tepid water

1
Ounce
Budweiser fresh cake yeast

.5
Cup
Spinach juice

1
Each
Large AAA egg

.125
Cup
Honey

2.25
Teaspoons
Kosher salt

.5
Teaspoon
Ground nutmeg

.75
Teaspoon
Minced garlic

.25
Cup
Vegetable oil

2.5
Cups +
Bread flour

Yellow cornmeal

The Finish:
1
Each
Large AAA egg

1
Tablespoon
Cold water

Melted butter




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Spinach prep: 2 ounces of spinach is about one-quarter of a bunch after the stems have been removed.  You can use an ounce scale to weigh it for good measure or you can just figure about one-quarter of a bunch.  Rinse it of all dirt underneath cold running water.  Then, combine it with the two cups of boiling water and allow it to wilt.  When it has, drain and reserve the water and press the spinach dry.  Then, chop it and press again.

2.      Pan preparation: Spray a sheet pan with PAM or some such other food release spray, line with a sheet of parchment paper, spray with PAM, and sprinkle with plenty of yellow cornmeal and set aside.

3.      The Finish: beat the egg until frothy with the cold water and then force through a fine-meshed sieve into a container—this is your eggwash. Have a foodservice pastry brush available that’s been sanitized.  Melt some butter with which you will glaze your finished rolls when they exit the oven. 

4.      The Brick Method: we use a pair of fire bricks in what we call the “Brick Method,” a way of mimicking the classic “oven spring” that professional bakers achieve when they use steam-injected ovens.  Unfortunately, most restaurant kitchens and certainly NO home kitchens have this ability so we mimic it by heating the bricks over an open flame and then placing them into a metal hotel pan and pouring boiling water over them which fills the oven with steam.  This makes the bread even better than it would be without them so if you can do this when directed to do so later in the recipe, it will make your finished product ten times better than it would be without using the method.  It works best with gas ranges but can be done using an electric range.

5.      The Bread Dough: combine the tepid water and yeast in the bowl of an electric mixer equipped with a dough hook and begin mixing on low speed. Add the spinach puree and juice, egg, honey, salt, nutmeg, minced garlic, and oil to the yeast mixture and blend together well. 

6.      Next, begin scaling in the bread flour along the sides of the bowl, bit-by-bit, until it’s all used up. Begin with the 2.5-cup measure but you might need to add more due to the time of year, the kitchen’s humidity, or the quality of the flour.  This is the imprecise part of yeast bread baking—the amount of flour used can vary each and every time; that is why you need to become adept at reading what’s going on with the dough as you shall soon see.

7.      Continue adding flour while mixing on low speed until the dough climbs off the sides of the bowl and onto the dough hook and remains there as it continues to rotate slowly about the bowl. If it pulls back onto the sides of the bowl, continue adding flour until it remains on the hook for about ONE minute—then stop mixing, and scoop the dough out onto a lightly-floured work bench.

8.      Rub your hands with flour and sprinkle more atop the dough and begin kneading it by pushing it out and then folding it in on top of itself.  Then pull in the sides folding them over one another and round into a ball.  Continue doing this Knead it until a smooth and elastic dough has formed—about 4-8 minutes.  Always pay attention to what you’re doing and don’t use too much flour and if the dough should start to tear, STOP IMMEDIATELY—IT’S OVER-KNEADED!

9.      Form it into a ball and place inside a metal bowl or pot that’s about twice the size of the dough ball and flour lightly top, bottom, and sides. Cover with a slightly moist cloth and set it someplace that’s relatively warm and free of drafts so that it can proof. Take care not to shake it or to jiggle the bowl and allow it to double in size, about 20-35 minutes but keep an eye on it. Preheat your standard oven to 400°F (convection oven to 350°F) if you didn’t leave it on and place a pot of water over a low flame. Have a couple of fire bricks ready but don’t place atop an open flame—yet.

10. When the dough has doubled in bulk, punch it down and then using a rolling pin, begin rolling it out on a lightly-floured surface until it’s about an inch thick.  Begin cutting 18 equal-size pieces with a dough knife.  If you have a measuring scale, this will simplify the process but if not, try to keep them as equal as possible.

11. When you have them, moisten your fingers and using a lightly-floured work surface, begin quickly rolling each one into a ball and press the bottom seam closed.  Place on the sheet pan about 2-inches apart.  If you need two pans, so be it. When you have all of the rolls, cover them with a dry cloth and place somewhere that it’s warm but not overpoweringly hot—like a high kitchen shelf.

12. Allow the rolls to double in bulk.  In the meantime, heat the bricks to red hot and bring the water to a boil.  Take the second egg and the cold water and whisk together until frothy—force through a fine-meshed sieve into a small bowl and get out a sanitized foodservice paint brush.  When the rolls have almost doubled in bulk, brush liberally with the eggwash mixture and then brush again.

13. While this is going on, heat the pair of fire bricks on an open gas flame and allow them to get very hot.  This is more difficult with an electric stove but do what you can.  When they’re hot, transfer them to the oven in a metal baking pan and place them onto the floor of the oven (in the pan).  Pour the hot water onto them taking care to stand back and shut the door.  Allow the steam to roam about the oven undisturbed for several minutes.

14. After 3-4 minutes, remove the bricks and water from the oven and keep baking the rolls. Usually, white flour dinner rolls take about 10-15 minutes as with the oven spring, achieved from the steam, they’re up, ready to explode.  They bake fairly fast so keep a close eye on them and when they’ve turned golden-brown, remove from the oven and place on a cooling rack. Brush with melted butter using the brush you used for the eggwash that’s been rinsed out thoroughly so as to remove all vestiges of raw egg from it.  Allow to remain on the pan for another 2-3 minutes and then remove and place directly on the rack or serve right away.

15. Generally, it’s best to use fresh homemade bread as quickly as possible and usually, that’s never a problem as people love fresh bread.  It was always one of my weaknesses and anytime I smelled them coming out of the oven at the hotel in which I worked as the breakfast cook, I always made sure I slipped to the back, grabbed a couple and ate them as quickly as possible before being caught.  Should you have leftovers, wrap them individually in plastic wrap and then place inside a Zip-Loc freezer bag and freeze for use at a later time.  Refrigerated storage is never really a good option as it tends to dry out fresh bread rather quickly.

These are beautiful rolls that have mottled white dough interspersed with flakes of green from the spinach.  Not only do they taste wonderful, they’re beautiful to behold and everyone I’ve ever fixed them for, has had nothing but good comments to make.  This is a good way to utilize leftover spinach especially in foodservice because the batch I’d normally make with this dough would be eight times as much and would produce about 136 rolls.  Anyhow, keep this recipe close at hand because you will use it time and time again.

                                      ---------------------------------------------                                     

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

One more day to go and then it’s back to sunny San Diego watching the United States Naval ships sail into the harbor.  We have such a beautiful city down there; right on the border of Latin America meaning that we have so many different culinary influences from which to choose that it’s difficult at times putting the best menu ever together!  Personally, being a Latino myself, I do prefer cooking the various cuisines of Mexico but I’m also partial to European cookery because let’s face it: the Europeans have always been the trendsetters and will forever be linked with classical cuisine.  The sad thing is that many Latin Americans look to Spain as the mother country whereas Spain doesn’t always seem to want to acknowledge her former children.  We take pilgrimages there and enjoy the cultural heritage bestowed upon us but it’s also sort of sad when they can’t seem to be bothered with ours.  Still, this wasn’t meant to become a diatribe against them as we do love our “parents” so-to-speak.  Back to San Diego, please come visit us as this is one of the greatest cities in all the U. S. and definitely within the state.  If only we could obtain a NBA and NHL team, we’d be in seventh heaven!  I love the Chargers and certainly the Padres but it seems our city is not cosmopolitan enough to warrant the addition of two more franchises.  I constantly rail the city fathers to do something but much like Los Angeles, they seem to be totally lethargic.  At least we have an NFL team whereas L. A. does NOT! Oh, boo hoo, Los Angeles!         

 Anyhow, let us close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by the DOORS and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com—we want to make some money here so help us out by buying something!  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

Thank you!

Pedro Munoz

Executive Chef Pedro Munoz
CEC, American Culinary Federation, Inc.


This is me at an awards dinner in San Diego for the Chefs de Cuisine in 1978. I began my culinary career in the 1950's and had the good fortune of working with many different chefs before meeting my good friend, Stinkbug, in the mid 1980's in Bakersfield. I am still working part-time in my semi-retired years in my home town in San Diego, CA.

---30---

The END Commentary for Saturday, March 24, 2012 by Chef Pedro R. Munoz



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef Pedro R. Munoz.



Recipe created by Chef Pedro R. Munoz on October 06, 1985 in San Diego, CA.

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STINKBUG AT THE COUNTDOWN TO THE END DAYS
                                                                           
                                                                         
This is #1399 a 40” x 48" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Truxtun Lakes at Sunset.’" It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures VII
                                                                        


PLEASE NOTE: WE HAVE BEEN STYMIED BY THE CALIFORNIA LAW TAXING THE INTERNET AND UNTIL WE CAN BEGIN POSTING LINKS TO AMAZON.COM AGAIN, YOU WILL HAVE TO GO THERE YOURSELF.  BE SURE TO WRITE GOVERNOR JERRY BROWN AND TELL HIM HE’S WRONG FOR WHAT HE’S DOING.  HE’S CRIPPLING BUSINESS BUT OF COURSE, HE KNOWS THAT! THANK YOU, THE ELEMENTAL NEWS OF THE DAY.















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