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Wednesday, March 21, 2012

“Yeast Bread Seminar, Pt. XXVIII: ‘Rye Flour Dinner Rolls are not only Tasty but fairly Simple to Make’ by Chef Pedro R. Munoz”



As with the past twelve days, we’ve been presenting the Doors to you for your listening enjoyment and now that we’ve completed their official albums, we enter the realm of the long-lost live treasure trove of albums that was always said not to exist when suddenly, they started coming out!  Their THIRTY-SECOND album—“Live in Philadelphia ‘70”—was released in 2005 and was another great retrospective live album by one of rock’s greatest bands ever!  You’ll definitely want to buy this one NOW!  [Unfortunately, the link may no longer be possible due to the fact that the Amazon.com Associates’ Program’s status is up in the air due to the fact that our home base is in California—you can still go there and BUY it!] Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.



                                                                      




Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 276 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!






                                                                                       


STINKBUG 2012


                                                                                 





Chef Pedro R. Munoz

END Commentary 03-22-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,102.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Thursday, March 22, 2012 by Chef Pedro R. Munoz

YEAST BREAD SEMINAR, PT. XXVIII

 Yeast Bread Seminar, Pt. XXVIII: ‘Rye Flour Dinner Rolls are not only Tasty but fairly Simple to Make’ by Chef Pedro R. Munoz



Bakersfield, CA, 03-22-2012 Th: My friends, we’ve arrived at Hump Day here at my segment of the Elemental News of the Day and am so glad because it means I’m one day closer to returning to San Diego, CA, and home.  The trip up the state through Los Angeles is always a bit nerve-wracking and I will be excited when and if the high-speed rail is built through the state.  I enjoy riding trains and find them to be fascinating modes of transportation and am enthused when my family and I can tour the United States via train.  Sure, it costs an arm and a leg to be able to sleep onboard the train but it’s part of the trip and therefore cannot be dispensed.  It wouldn’t make sense to stay in hotels and take a different train each and every day so we use the sleeper cars and see what we can.  If you ever have the desire to take your family on an unforgettable trip, this is the way in which to do it!  

Today, we will make a rye-flour roll which is a marvelous accompaniment for any evening meal.  The medium rye is flavorful, not too overpowering, and fairly easy to make.  Rye flour is a specialty flour and must be combined with bread-or-all-purpose flour at a ratio of 1-part rye to 5 parts bread-or-all-purpose flour for best results.  The reason for the combining and for the ratio is that rye flour is lacking in the gluten and needs the gluten of the all-purpose/bread flour to help it rise properly and to hold together.  I’m sure there are European breads that use strictly rye but they have techniques of which I’m not aware to make them work.  Besides, rye by itself can have an earthy flavor which is why it’s good to temper it with a lighter wheat flour.  Also note that the addition of caraway seeds is what really gives rye its distinctive flavor so if you leave them out, you will have a completely different-tasting bread.  Don’t be afraid to experiment, that is what life is all about.  Let’s do it:

(#115) RYE FLOUR ROLLS





Yield: 1.5 Dozen 1.75-2-ounce rolls / Mis-en-place: 1.25 to 1.5 hours +




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
Tablespoon
Warm water

1
Ounce
Fresh cake yeast

.5
Cup
Tepid milk

0.5
Ounce
Baking chocolate (unsweetened)

1
Large
Egg

1.5
Tablespoon
Dark molasses

1.5
Tablespoon
Malt flavoring

1.5
Teaspoons
Kosher salt

1
Teaspoon
Ground caraway seeds

.25
Cup
Vegetable oil

.75
Cup
Medium rye flour

2
Cups
Bread flour
PLUS
Yellow cornmeal

1
Large
Egg
Beaten and strained
1
Tablespoon
Cold water

Whole caraway seed

Melted butter




Method:

1.      Using an electric mixer equipped with a dough hook, combine the warm water with the fresh cake yeast and mix.  When mashed into a paste, allow it to sit for several minutes; if bubbles begin to appear, it’s activated and if not, add a little more warm water and mix for another minute or two.  If the kitchen is exceptionally cold, i.e., wintertime, place the bowl someplace warm where it can activate.  Don’t place it someplace HOT!

a.      We will be employing the brick method today which is one that is meant to mimic the effects of a steam-injection oven which causes oven-spring to increase dramatically.  You will need a pair of fire bricks and a pot of boiling water and when it’s time to employ the method is prior to the rolls/bread being placed inside the oven.  The hot bricks are covered with boiling water and then the oven is allowed to be enveloped with steam.  A few minutes later, the raw dough is placed inside and allowed a final proof.  You will be informed when it’s time to use the method.  Note: always be careful handling hot items!

2.      Have the other ingredients ready and be sure to beat the eggs until frothy and then force through a fine-meshed sieve into a container. Spray a sheet pan with PAM or some such other food release spray, line with a sheet of parchment paper, spray with PAM, and sprinkle with plenty of yellow cornmeal and set aside.  Preheat oven to 300°F for the time-being.

3.      Add the milk, chocolate, egg, molasses, salt, ground caraway seed, and oil to the yeast mixture and blend together well.  Add the rye flour. Then, begin scaling in the bread flour along the sides of the bowl, bit-by-bit, until it’s all used up.

4.      Now, due to the time of the year, the humidity, and the quality of the flour, it may take MORE flour to get to where we want: continue adding flour while mixing on low speed until the dough climbs off the sides of the bowl and onto the dough hook and remains there as it continues to rotate slowly about the bowl. If it pulls back onto the sides of the bowl, continue adding flour until it remains on the hook for about ONE minute—then stop mixing, and scoop the dough out onto a lightly-floured work bench.

5.      Rub your hands with flour and sprinkle more atop the dough and begin to knead it. Knead it firmly until smooth and elastic to the touch—about 4-8 minutes. This is firm dough so you have to knead it briskly but if too firm, knead in a little warm water on your fingertips but don’t go overboard and get it sopping wet.

6.      When it’s somewhat smooth and springy, form it into a ball and place inside a metal bowl or pot that’s about twice the size of the dough ball and flour lightly top, bottom, and sides. Cover with a slightly moist cloth and set it someplace that’s relatively warm and free of drafts so that it can proof. Take care not to shake it or to jiggle the bowl and allow it to double in size, about 40-45 minutes but keep an eye on it. Preheat your standard oven to 400°F (convection oven to 350°F) and place a pot of water over a low flame. Have a couple of fire bricks ready but don’t place atop an open flame—yet.

7.      When the dough has doubled in bulk, punch it down and then using a rolling pin; begin rolling it out on a lightly-floured surface until it’s about an inch thick.  Begin cutting 18 equal-size pieces with a dough knife.  If you have a measuring scale, this will simplify the process but if not, try to keep them as equal as possible.

8.      When you have them, moisten your fingers and using a lightly-floured work surface, begin quickly rolling each one into a ball and press the bottom seam closed.  Place on the sheet pan about 2-inches apart.  If you need two pans, so be it. When you have all of the rolls, cover them with a dry cloth and place somewhere that it’s warm but not overpoweringly hot—like a high kitchen shelf.

9.      Allow the rolls to double in bulk.  In the meantime, heat the bricks to red hot and bring the water to a boil.  Take the second egg and the cold water and whisk together until frothy—force through a fine-meshed sieve into a small bowl and get out a sanitized foodservice paint brush.  When the rolls have almost doubled in bulk, brush liberally with the eggwash mixture and then brush again. 

10. Place a bake dish or a hotel pan in the oven and place the bricks inside.  Pour in the boiling water, taking precautions to avoid the onrushing blast of steam, and allow the oven to humidify for a minute or two.  Then, place the pan with the rolls on it inside and begin to bake.

11. After 3-4 minutes, remove the bricks and water from the oven and keep baking the rolls. Usually, rye flour rolls take about 20-25 minutes as with the oven spring, achieved from the steam, they’re up, ready to explode.  They bake quickly due to the eggs and turn a golden-brown with a darkened top.  The finished product is simply beautiful; these are some of the best rolls one will ever see.

12. When golden-brown, remove from the oven and place on a cooling rack.  Brush with melted butter using the brush you used for the eggwash that’s been rinsed out thoroughly so as to remove all vestiges of raw egg from it.  Allow to remain on the pan for another 2-3 minutes and then remove and place directly on the rack or serve right away.

13. You can freeze leftovers but these are best if used as soon as possible. Eat ‘em all up!

This is basic roll dough that can be used to make everything from fantans to butterhorns and from cloverleaves to braids.  It is tender dough that makes soft bread but with rye flour and ground caraway seed has a completely different feel and taste than if made completely with straight bread flour. Don’t be afraid to experiment.

                                      ---------------------------------------------                                     

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

Well, like most of the rest of my compatriots, I feel duty-bound to inform you that we’ve made it through our Hump Day sand are on the road to the end of the week rather quickly now.  I love writing for Stinkbug but I also love living in San Diego and being near the beach.  My time spent in Oildale, CA, is just not the same but it’s our duty to come to the test kitchen at the Elemental News of the Day main offices so we can prepare our recipes for posting.  Don’t get me wrong, Oildale is a very nice place if you enjoy seeing grown men all tatted-up walking around in their wife-beater t-shirts and their underwear hanging out.  To me, it’s an amazing sight to see a 40-year-old man riding a skateboard around and cripples pushing themselves along in wheelchairs swearing at everything and everyone that gets in their way.  I’m also told that a street gang by the name of the “Oildale Peckerwoods” is roaming the streets and will rob you and burglarize your house or car if you leave it unattended.  It is an amazing world in which we live and I can assure you, one that I am glad to vacate as soon as possible so I can return to the loveliest beaches in all the state of California!         

 Anyhow, let us close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by the DOORS and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com—we want to make some money here so help us out by buying something!  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

Thank you!

Pedro Munoz

Executive Chef Pedro Munoz
CEC, American Culinary Federation, Inc.


This is me at an awards dinner in San Diego for the Chefs de Cuisine in 1978. I began my culinary career in the 1950's and had the good fortune of working with many different chefs before meeting my good friend, Stinkbug, in the mid 1980's in Bakersfield. I am still working part-time in my semi-retired years in my home town in San Diego, CA.

---30---

The END Commentary for Thursday, March 22, 2012 by Chef Pedro R. Munoz



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef Pedro R. Munoz.



Recipe created by Chef Pedro R. Munoz on February 12, 1973 in San Diego, CA.

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STINKBUG AT THE COUNTDOWN TO THE END DAYS

                                                                                
                                                                      
This is #1397 a 12” x 16" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Carmel Coast.’" It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures VII
                                                                          


PLEASE NOTE: WE HAVE BEEN STYMIED BY THE CALIFORNIA LAW TAXING THE INTERNET AND UNTIL WE CAN BEGIN POSTING LINKS TO AMAZON.COM AGAIN, YOU WILL HAVE TO GO THERE YOURSELF.  BE SURE TO WRITE GOVERNOR JERRY BROWN AND TELL HIM HE’S WRONG FOR WHAT HE’S DOING.  HE’S CRIPPLING BUSINESS BUT OF COURSE, HE KNOWS THAT! THANK YOU, THE ELEMENTAL NEWS OF THE DAY.















CAVEAT:

NOTE: EVERYONE WHO WRITES FOR THE ELEMENTAL NEWS OF THE DAY DOES SO UNDER AN ALIAS DUE TO FREQUENT OPINIONS THAT MIGHT NOT ALWAYS BE ACCEPTABLE AT THEIR PLACES OF EMPLOYMENT. THANK YOU, Moses Scharbug III.




                                                                      



                                                                                  
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Tags:

Pedro Munoz, Yeast Bread Seminar, Bread Seminar, Yeast Rolls, Sweet Breads, Classic Bakery Recipes, Gourmet Breads, Bakery Recipes, Breads, The Doors, Egg Doughs, Shaped Rolls, Specialty Flours,








                                                                                  

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