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Tuesday, March 13, 2012

“Special Menus Index, Pt. XXXVIII: ‘St. Patrick’s Day Menu 2012, Pt. III—Famous Restaurant Recipes—two Excellent Irish Entrees: Corned Beef and Cabbage and Roasted Leg of Lamb with Cinnamon-Rhubarb Sauce—two masterful Presentations’ by Chef Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein”



As with the past twelve days, we’ve been presenting the Doors to you for your listening enjoyment and now that we’ve completed their official albums, we enter the realm of the long-lost live treasure trove of albums that was always said not to exist when suddenly, they started coming out!  Their TWENTY-FOURTH album—“Live at the Aquarius Theater: the First Performance”—was released in 2001 and was another great retrospective live album by one of rock’s greatest bands!  You’ll definitely want to buy this one NOW!  [Unfortunately, the link may no longer be possible due to the fact that the Amazon.com Associates’ Program’s status is up in the air due to the fact that our home base is in California—you can still go there and BUY it!] Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.




                                                                                



Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 284 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!




                                                                                      

STINKBUG 2012


                                                                                   





Chef Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein

END Commentary 03-14-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 3,368.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Wednesday, March 14, 2012 by Chef Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein

SPECIAL MENUS INDEX, PT. XXXVIII

Special Menus Index, Pt. XXXVIII: ‘St. Patrick’s Day Menu 2012, Pt. III—Famous Restaurant Recipes—two Excellent Irish Entrees: Corned Beef and Cabbage and Roasted Leg of Lamb with Cinnamon-Rhubarb Sauce—two masterful Presentations’ by Chef Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein



Bakersfield, CA, 03-14-2012 W: Boy oh boy, today we have a really big day to work through but once we’re done, you’ll have your two entrees with which to enliven your Irish festival for St. Patrick’s Day.  One is a traditional corned beef and cabbage presentation whereas the other is a modern creation featuring a boneless tied leg of lamb.  Both of them can stand alone whereas together, they’ll knock you out!  Both of them take time so that’s good we’re working on them today, Wednesday, because you will need at least 48 hours to prepare the lamb leg.  Sure, if you need to speed up the marinating time, by all means, do so but if not, the ensuing flavor will be stupendous!  That is the goal of the Elemental News of the Day: to provide nothing but the best by way of the combined knowledge of its contributors and all we ask is that you share our site with your friends, family, neighbors, amigos, co-workers, and church members!                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

Corned beef and cabbage is one of those dishes that can only be done pretty much in the same way but this one is going to rock your world just a little bit as it’s somewhat different in a very sweet-and-sour-sort-of-way.  Gulden’s brown mustard and brown sugar combined make a heady glaze that will give your meat amazing flavor and will defy speculation as to what caused it.  This is definitely one of the better dishes that anyone around here has for this particular holiday and I am so glad that it was my turn to present it.  I’m also glad that the following recipe, the roasted lamb leg, will be something you’ve probably never seen and that’s always good.  We want to both surprise and to delight you and believe me, it’s definitely going to do that!

Here’s our menu:

ST. PATRICKS DAY 2012 DINNER MENU

I.                  Colcannon

II.               Lamb Salad

III.           Corned Beef and Chicken Chowder

IV.           Irish Lamb Soup

V.               Corned Beef and Cabbage

VI.           Braised Lamb with Cinnamon-Rhubarb Sauce

VII.        Roasted New Potatoes

VIII.    Buttered Red Potatoes and Rutabagas

IX.           Carrots and Parsnips

X.               Turnips and Peas

XI.           Irish Soda Bread

XII.        Cranberry Scones

XIII.    Apple-Pear Shortbread

XIV.    Bailey’s Irish Cream Cheesecake

******

Okay, first off the bat is the corned beef and cabbage, the traditional dish for St. Patrick’s Day.  It’s one of those things brought by the Brits when they colonized most of the civilized world, something that Hawaiians know, love, and revere in much the same way as the Irish do.  It was packed onto British ships and carried around the world and in this case, merely went across the Irish Sea to the Emerald Isle where it took root.  The good thing about it is, it’s difficult to mess up because it is pretty tough and defies most mistakes, accidents, and unexpected problems.  Here we go:

(#1030) CORNED BEEF AND CABBAGE I (03-17-1975)





Yield:  8 servings  / Mis-en-place: 3-3.25 hours:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
6-8 #
Corned beef brisket

8
Quarts
Chicken stock

2
Ribs
Celery, chopped 

2
Each
Yellow onion, chopped

2
Each
Carrot, chopped

2
Each
Bay leaf

.125
Cup
Whole pickling spice

2
Teaspoons
Ground coriander

2
Teaspoons
Lawrey’s seasoned pepper

1.5
Teaspoons
Summer savory

8
Strips
Farmer John’s thick smoked bacon, chopped 

.125
Cup
Gulden’s brown mustard

1.5
Cups
Brown sugar

24
Each
Canned whole potatoes

6
Each
Medium carrots, cut into sixth’s

2
Each
Turnips, cut into sixth’s

2
Heads
Green cabbage, cut into sixth’s (or more depending upon size)
2-3
Cups
Horseradish sauce (Recipe #336)

.25
Cup
Freshly minced parsley flakes
Rinsed
Sprigs fresh parsley
Rinsed
Hungarian paprika




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work!  Place the corned beef before you on a cutting board and then using a sharp steak or French knife, trim off some of the excess fat but don’t separate the 2-3 parts of the brisket from one another; leave whole if you possibly can.  Also, cut the cabbage in this manner: cut the heads into sixth’s and then do NOT trim out the root structure as this is what will hold the vegetable together when it’s cooked.  It’s not professional to have your cabbage wedge falling apart on the plate. Proceed:

2.      Place a large stock pot on the stove over a medium-high flame.  Add the chicken stock to it and then the chopped vegetables, the herbs and spices, and the bacon.   Heat it up and when it’s fairly warm, drop the prepped corned beef brisket into it and cook for at least 2.25-2.5 hours or until its fork tender.  Don’t allow it to cook until it is falling apart but cook it so that a kitchen fork can easily be inserted into it.  When it is, drop the flame to almost nothing and remove the brisket to a cutting board.

3.      When the cooking time is almost up, turn your standard oven to 400°F or you convection oven—fan “on”—to 350°F; have ready.  When the brisket has been removed from the pot and placed on the cutting board, prepare it for the oven.  Slather the mustard onto it and rub it in and then place it onto a sheet pan.  Place inside the oven and pack it with the brown sugar.  Return to the oven and bake it for 4-5 minutes so that the sugar gets sort of crusty; then, it’s time to baste and glaze the meat.

4.      Using some of the cooking stock from the pot, dribble just enough onto the sugar to slightly melt it: it will begin to melt on its own and to spread out over the meat.  Add more liquid if you need to but don’t overdo it—just allow it to glaze the brisket.  Do this over the next ten minutes and then cover the meat with a piece of foil.

5.      Prepare the horseradish sauce during this time by following the succeeding recipe.  When it’s done, keep it warm in the top of a Bain Marie.

6.      While the meat is finishing in the pot and then is being prepped for the oven, prepare the turnips by simmering them in some of the stock—this might take 10-20 minutes so be observant and don’t overcook them.  Steam the carrots in your steamer or simmer them in the stock taking care to NOT overcook them.  Heat the canned whole new potatoes in some of the corned beef stock until good and hot; keep warm.  When all of the vegetables are done, butter and season them separately and keep warm.

7.      Place the cabbage wedges into a perforated pan and then place that pan in a pan of the same size, only deeper, and fill it with the remaining corned beef cooking liquid.  Moisten a cloth towel and drape it over the cabbage and then clamp on a lid.  Place this pan atop two of your stovetop burners and fire it up.  Steam the cabbage for about 10-12 minutes until its tender but NOT falling apart.  When they’re ready, turn off the flame and prepare the plates:

8.      Bring out 8 of your nicest plates and upon each, place a cabbage wedge or two.  Then, bring out the corned beef and slice it, putting about 6-7-ounces of meat atop it.  Ladle Horseradish Sauce over the meat and then place buttered vegetables (carrots and turnips) into two separate mounds with three buttered new potatoes in between them. 

9.      Sprinkle freshly minced parsley over everything and then plant a sprig of parsley in the midst of everything.  Give a final shake or two of Hungarian paprika over everything to give it a bit of additional color and then prepare to serve.  Accompany the plates with a couple of goosenecks of the remaining horseradish sauce and take to the table.  Expect to receive a lot of kudos for your presentation and its flavor!

Here’s the Horseradish Sauce recipe:

(#336) HORSERADISH SAUCE





Yield:  about 3.5 cups / Mis-en-place: 20-25 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1.5
Cups
Milk

1.5
Cups
Hot beef stock

3
Tablespoons
Melted butter

3/8
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.25
Teaspoon
White pepper

3.5
Tablespoons
All-purpose flour

2.25
Teaspoons
Horseradish

3/8
Cup
Chopped pimientos, dried beforehand

3/8
Teaspoon
Freshly minced parsley rinsed and dried

1
Each
Bay leaf




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Combine the milk and beef stock in a saucepot and place over medium-high heat. In another saucepot sprayed with PAM or some such other food release spray, combine the melted butter, salt, pepper, and all-purpose flour.  Blend well to form a blond roux and cook over medium-heat, stirring almost constantly, until thickened, somewhat light, and hot.

2.      Bring the liquid to a boil and then whisk it into the roux—FURIOUSLY!—until the liquid has reared up and is boiling hard and fast. Continue whisking for 2-3 minutes and then lower the heat to low and allow it to perk over a very low flame.

3.      After about 5-6 minutes, add the remaining ingredients and blend well.  Allow it to cook for another 4-5 minutes and then remove from the flame and transfer to a sauceboat for service at the table.

This is one way to make horseradish sauce or “gravy,” especially for corned beef and cabbage.  The stock from the corned beef makes a wonderful sauce so always be sure to use it whenever you have any leftover from cooking a corned beef brisket.  Note: this sauce was created on St. Patrick’s Day in 1975.

This is a great corned beef and cabbage recipe that goes back to the beginning of last century.  It’s tasty, it’s beautiful, and it will make for a memorable St. Patrick’s Day if ever there was one!

Wow, what a recipe the last one was!  Now, we’ll move on to our lamb dish, be sure to look around for nothing but the best which—sadly—is no longer American but New Zealand: here we go:

(#1310) ROASTED LEG OF LAMB WITH CINNAMON-RHUBARB SAUCE (03-17-2005)





Yield:  6-8 servings  / Mis-en-place: 48-52 hours:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
4.5-4.75
RW Boneless leg of lamb, tied 

.5
Cup
Vegetable oil

.125
Cup
Whole rosemary

1
Tablespoon
Lawrey’s seasoned salt

1
Tablespoon
Adolph’s meat tenderizer

1
Tablespoon
Granulated garlic

2
Teaspoons
Lawrey’s seasoned pepper

2
Teaspoons
Whole marjoram

1
Teaspoon
Whole thyme

2
Each
Bay leaves

1
Each
Yellow onion, peeled and chopped

2
Each
Medium carrots, peeled and chopped

2
Each
Ribs celery, chopped

1
Each
Whole leek, trimmed and chopped

1
Bunch
Fresh mint, chopped

1
Quart
Boiling water

2
Cups
Port Sherry




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Have everything ready with which to work! TWO days before you plan to have dinner, prepare the lamb by slathering it with vegetable oil and then rubbing it with the spices.  Place it in the pan in which you will roast it and add the vegetables, bay leaves, and the mint.  Cover tightly with plastic wrap and allow it to seep in the flavorings for 48 hours.  Turn it around and over-and-upside-down 2-3 times during this flavoring period.

2.      Four hours before dinner is to be served, heat your standard oven to 425°F or your convection oven—fan in the “on” position—to 375°F.  When it’s hot, unwrap the lamb leg and place it within.  Roast for 20 minutes at this temperature and then drop the temp by 75°F.  Continue cooking for another 2-3 hours or until the meat is between 140°F-145°F for rare to medium-rare.  As it cooks, roll it over once or twice to expose all sides to the oven’s heat.  Note: without the bone, it will cook much more quickly than with it still within.

3.      About two hours before the meat is done, add the boiling water and the port sherry to the pan and allow it to cook in the liquid.  Monitor the temperature of the meat and when it’s close to 140°F, watch it closely.  It will continue cooking a bit once it’s removed so generally, most people like their lamb medium-rare to medium so keep a close eye on it. When it’s close to being done, pull it out and allow it to rest on a cutting board with a heat lamp on it.  It needs to rest so that the juices will be distributed equally throughout the meat so DON’T slice it yet.

4.      Here is the Cinnamon-Rhubarb Sauce which will make the lamb tasty:

CINNAMON-RHUBARB SAUCE





Yield: about one quart / Mis-en-place: 30 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
4
#
Frozen cherry rhubarb, in its own juices

1.5
Quarts
Cherry juice

1
Quart
Granulated sugar

1
Teaspoon
Almond extract

.5
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

1
Teaspoon
Red food color

1
Tablespoon
Ground cinnamon

1
Teaspoon
Pineapple flavoring

.5
Teaspoon
Lemon juice

1
Cup
Clear gel or cornstarch

Rhubarb juice




Method:

5.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! You can use fresh rhubarb but it must be washed, trimmed, and ALL green removed because whether you know it or not, the green is poisonous and not fit for human consumption.  Amazing, isn’t it? Frozen is preferable because it actually doesn’t shrivel up to nothing and also because it has juice on it if you can find it that way. Either way, have it ready and if frozen, drain it and keep the fruit chilled.

6.      Place the water into a large saucepot and place over a medium flame.  Combine the remaining ingredients together in the bowl of an electric mixer and combine at low speed.  Add some of the hot water—just enough to moisten and to dissolve the clear gel (preferable) or cornstarch—and then stop mixing.

7.      Add the rest of the liquid out of the saucepot and blend well.  Spray the pot with PAM or some such other food release spray and then pour the liquid back into it from the mixer through a fine-meshed sieve.  Force through any remaining blobs of gel or sugar.

8.      Bring the heat up to a high simmer-low boil and stirring constantly, cook it until the gel has thickened and has become clear.  Stop then and remove from the stove.  Add the rhubarb gently by folding it in with a kitchen spoon. When all combined, add enough reserved rhubarb juice to it to achieve sauce consistency: have it at a medium thickness so that when it’s ladled over the meat, it won’t run off but at the same time isn’t so thick that it’s clunky.

9.      Always cool to below 45°F if saving for later and keep it refrigerated in a sanitized airtight container.  The filling will remain usable for 4-5 days and then must be either used or discarded.

This is the classic rhubarb formula that everyone knows and loves; well, at least the rhubarb fans! It makes a marvelously different sort of sauce that most people will be intrigued by. Here’s the final lamb leg presentation:

10. To serve the LAMB: slice the lamb and transfer the meat to either a platter or to individual serving plates.  Douse each serving with some of the Cinnamon-Rhubarb Sauce.  Here’s the finish:

Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
Fresh sprigs of mint

.125
Cup
Freshly minced parsley
Rinsed



11. Garnish each plate with fresh mint sprigs and sprinkle fresh parsley flakes over-all.  Be sure to accompany with vegetables and potatoes of choice. 

This is a classic preparation of roasted lamb, one that most people love.  You will need to serve mint jelly with it anyway because no matter what: there’s always one in every crowd who will demand it.  Besides, it’s the traditional accompaniment that most lamb-lovers feel bad if denied so be prepared to offer it.  It’s like serving potatoes without ketchup on the table: people squawk!

This is a great dish for St. Patrick’s Day as lamb is more or less one of the national dishes of Ireland.  It doesn’t take a great deal of land upon which to raise sheep and they multiply and spread far and wide which makes them an ideal flock.  Besides, the quality of lamb has improved a great deal nowadays and no longer has the gamey flavors once associated with it.  Give a try: you’ll see what I mean!

                                      ---------------------------------------------                                     

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

We’ve gotten the main dishes out of the way and that, my friends, is the most important thing to do for the oncoming St. Patrick’s Day celebration because that is what most people will concentrate on.  Still, I’m sorry that I wasn’t given the opportunity to have presented this menu a week earlier so that you would have been able to see the whole thing in advance and then prepare it.  It’s always nice having time to “digest” something rather than to have to rush it through, a bit of kitchen humor!  But as for the items that will be presented on Sunday, you can go online and find them somewhere else and they’ll work just as good.  Mine, you’ll have them for future reference!  I do hope you’ve enjoyed what we’ve done today, both corned beef and lamb are ultimate flavorful presentations.  One is traditional, the other is modern which reflects on the fact that Ireland has moved into the modern world sans the occupation by England.  Sure, I realize they were there to keep the peace in Northern Ireland but the Irish didn’t want them in the first place ergo, they should have gone home.  But I’m so glad that things have changed for the good there, it is a beautiful country, I’ve been there two times in my life, and if the Irish-British can get their act together, so can the blooming Israelis and Palestinians!  Enough’s enough with all of the violence in the Middle East, something good has to happen before the world can move on!  Can’t we all just be friends?  Gosh, I remember the old song by War, it really fits the situation!  

 Anyhow, let us close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by the DOORS and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com—we want to make some money here so help us out by buying something!  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

Thank you!

Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein

The Chuckster
Restaurant Manager, Mixologist, Foodserver, and Cook


This is a photo of me back in 1973 while being the Food and Beverage Director at one of the hotels in Bakersfield, CA, located on Union Avenue. I was in my late 30's at the time. I am still working at one of the local hotels in the nearby town of Delano, CA, a place that’s been my home for the past 10 years. Our city has experienced marvelous growth and is fast-becoming a player in county politics.

---30---

The END Commentary for Wednesday, March 14, 2012 by Chef Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein.



Recipe created by Chef Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein on March 17, 2005 in Delano, CA.

KEEP READING THE ELEMENTARY NEWS OF THE DAY FOR THE BEST OF CULINARY POLITICS!

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“Stinky” of the Elemental News of the Day for the best of the news, politics, sports, foodservice, hotel and restaurant business, the end times, the end of days, the apocalypse, armageddon, and whatever else happens to pop up!

 




                                                                             

STINKBUG AT THE COUNTDOWN TO THE END DAYS

                                                                                                                                                          
                                                                       

This is #1389 a 14” x 11" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Caterpillar and Alice.’" It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures VII
                                                                                

MARCH 17 IS ST. PATRICK’S DAY!



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Tags:

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