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Sunday, February 19, 2012

“Mis-en-Place, Pt. VIII: ‘How to make the Classic Stocks properly—one of the Most Important Jobs in any Professional Kitchen (featuring Beef and Veal Stocks and the Floating Island’), Pt. I by Chef Olaf Bologolo”



Today, we begin presenting another of the Los Angeles bands for your listening pleasure—the DOORS.  They have always been among the top bands of the psychedelic era thanks to the presence and voice of Jim Morrison and their sound.  They were unique in their style and are still as good today as they were then.  We are very proud to present them!  Their THIRD album—“Waiting for the Sun”—was released on July 11, 1968 and is still one of the all-time classic rock albums. [Unfortunately, the link may no longer be possible due to the fact that the Amazon.com Associates’ Program’s status is up in the air due to the fact that our home base is in California—you can still go there and BUY it!] Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.






                                                                               

Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 307 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!




                                                                                     


STINKBUG 2012


                                                                                





Chef Olaf Bologolo

END Commentary 02-20-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,220.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Monday, February 20, 2012 by Chef Olaf Bologolo

MIS-EN-PLACE, PT. VIII

Mis-en-Place, Pt. VIII: ‘How to make the Classic Stocks properly—one of the Most Important Jobs in any Professional Kitchen (featuring Beef and Veal Stocks and the Floating Island’), Pt. I by Chef Olaf Bologolo



Bakersfield, CA, 02-20-2012 M: Hello, again, friends and readers of the Elemental News of the Day blog!  Last time I was here was on the 18th of September of last year so I’ve been off for FIVE months and must praise Stinkbug for his amazing achievement in giving us five months off between our week-long series of posts.  The fact that he’s brought in fresh blood is pretty phenomenal and if we ever get Smokehouse writing again, we’ll be back to our selves.   I can assure you that all of us do our best to present to you nothing but the most important and relevant recipes for you to make your own soups, stocks, and sauces and that is a service you get here and nowhere else on the Internet.  One of these days, Stinkbug will be recognized for the good that he does and you will be amazed at the success he already maintains thanks in part to you!

The Mis-en-Place series returns today for a more in-depth look at some of the recipes we originally blew through, much like today’s important recipes.  We are going to work at learning how to make appropriate stocks in a perfect way.  At some point, we will have to step aside whenever a real flesh-and-blood chef enters the picture but until then, what we do in Cyber Space is sufficient.  It is important to know how to make stocks from scratch if one is willing to take chances to move up the professional ladder in kitchens not only in the United States but around the world.  Sure, everyone does it differently but I can assure you that we do it best.  You need to stick around and see so that you can suggest us to your friends.  We need more-and-more readers to join us so that we can keep our fabulous blog up-and-running and not fail our shareholders, creditors, and most of all, our followers.  Please join us as followers—we need you now more so than ever! Thank you!

The process of making stocks while time-consuming, is a very important aspect of the professional kitchen, usually conducted by the once-prevalent Prepmaster position but now is performed by the use of concentrated soup bases in most restaurants.  We find this tragic here at the END as we attempt to keep the old ways alive while not giving into the time-saving conveniences urged upon us by our purveyors.  Like everyone else, I had the opportunity to have come up at a time which was still a crossroads of sort: we were on the border of where one time period was ending and where another was beginning and unfortunately, the old one was far better than the newer model.  Very few people have any idea as to how to go about making stocks and broths much less how to and the purpose of making a Floating Island.  This is what we hope to accomplish this week among other things.  Let’s do it:

(#213) BASIC VEAL STOCK


Yield:  2.5 gallons  / Mis-en-place: 24-48 hours:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
5
#
Veal bones

5
#
Reserved steak trim (mostly fat)

2
Cups
Burgundy

2.5
#
Bouquet garni (recipe #204)

2
Tablespoons
Black peppercorns

2
Tablespoons
Dry thyme

1
Tablespoon
Better-than-Bouillon beef base

1
#
Chopped carrots, peels, and ends;

1
#
Chopped yellow onions and peels

1
#
Chopped celery and leaves

1
#
Chopped leeks, green and white parts

1
#
Mushroom stems and pieces

1
Bulb
Whole garlic

4
Whole
Shallots, separated

4
Each
Bay leaves

3-4
Gallons
Cold water

2
Cups
Worcestershire sauce

Floating Island (Recipe #212)




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Preheat your standard oven to 450°F or your convection oven—fan “on”—to 400°F.  Place the veal bones into a roasting pan and add the fat.  Place inside the hot oven and roast them until they’re beginning to show signs of charcoal on the pan’s floor and they’re getting roasted.  Drop the heat by 50°F and continue roasting them until a great deal of oil’s been rendered; drain off and reserve this oil for use in making roux. 

2.      Pour the wine into the pan to deglaze it.  Scrape the charcoal off of the bottom with a kitchen spoon making sure to loosen all of it.  Turn off the oven and transfer the bones along with the charcoalized material into a large stock pot and cover with the water.  Add the rest of the ingredients (with the exception of the last one) and bring the pot to a boil; when it has, keep it there for 4-5 minutes and then lower the heat to the lowest of lows and simmer for 24-36 hours, checking the level of the liquid occasionally.  Prepare the Floating Island and add it NOW (see below).

3.      As it simmers, skim off any oil that rises to the surface as well as foam and discard it.  Keep an eye on the pot so that it never runs out of liquid but if you have the flame on LOW, it shouldn’t.  When everything appears to be cooked to mush, pour the broth through a chinois lined with wax paper and another chinois placed atop it.  Remove all debris and residue and discard.  Return the stock to the stove and complete the process:

4.      Return to a boil and add the Worcestershire sauce.  Keep there for several minutes and then lower the flame to low and reduce the liquid to 2.5 gallons or less as this will concentrate the flavor.  When the process is over, pour the stock through a fine-meshed sieve once more into several large pans placed atop cooling racks.  Place a fan to blow on the stock and bring it down to less than 45°F as quickly as possible; then transfer into Styrofoam containers with lids or some other sanitized storage containers with lids and label as to the contents, the date, and the amount and freeze for use at a later date.

Below is the classic Floating Island, a meringue that is used to collect all of the impurities from the pot.  It is indispensable for making classic stocks. 

(#212) FLOATING ISLAND

1.      Separate SIX large AAA eggs; place the yolks in a jar and freeze for use at another time and place the whites in the bowl of an electric mixer equipped with a whip attachment.  Beat them until stiff, much like a meringue.  Spread this mixture across the top of the simmering stock and allow it to float about the pot collecting impurities as it does so.  When it’s been in there for 45-60 minutes, the pot should be relatively impurity-free. Discard the Floating Island and continue with the stock-making process.

There you go—the one-and-only veal stock for use in making Demi-glace.  A must-have for all chefs, this one is extremely important!

Alright, let’s move on to our next stock, the unparalleled beef stock made with the use of fresh prime rib bones:

(#213) BASIC BEEF STOCK


Yield:  2.5 gallons  / Mis-en-place: 48 hours:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
5
#
Beef bones (like prime rib bones, etc.)

5
#
Reserved steak trim (mostly fat)

2
Cups
Burgundy

2.5
#
Bouquet garni (recipe #204)

2
Tablespoons
Black peppercorns

2
Tablespoons
Dry thyme

1
Tablespoon
Better-than-Bouillon beef base

4
Gallons
Cold water

2
#
Chopped carrots

2
#
Chopped celery with leaves and roots

2
#
Chopped yellow onions

1
#
Chopped red onions

1
#
Chopped leeks, scallions, and shallots

1
Bunch
Parsley with stems

2
Bulbs
Whole garlic

4
Each
Bay leaves

10
Each
Whole cloves

The Finish:
2
Cups
Worcestershire sauce



                                                                  

Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work!  Preheat your standard oven to 450°F or your convection oven—fan “on”—to 400°F.  Place the beef bones into a roasting pan and add the fat.  Place inside the hot oven and roast them until they’re beginning to show signs of charcoal on the pan’s floor and they’re getting roasted.  Drop the heat by 50°F and continue roasting them until a great deal of oil’s been rendered; drain off and reserve this oil for use in making roux. 

2.      Pour the wine into the pan to deglaze it.  Scrape the charcoal off of the bottom with a kitchen spoon making sure to loosen all of it.  Turn off the oven and transfer the bones along with the charcoalized material into a large stock pot and cover with the water.  Add the rest of the ingredients and bring the pot to a boil; when it has, keep it there for 4-5 minutes and then lower the heat to the lowest of lows and simmer for 24-36 hours, checking the level of the liquid occasionally. 

3.      As it simmers, skim off any oil that rises to the surface as well as foam and discard it.  Keep an eye on the pot so that it never runs out of liquid but if you have the flame on LOW, it shouldn’t.  When everything appears to be cooked to mush, pour the broth through a chinois lined with wax paper and another chinois placed atop it.  Remove all debris and residue and discard.  Return the stock to the stove and complete the process:

4.      Return to a boil and add the Worcestershire sauce.  Keep there for several minutes and then lower the flame to low and reduce the liquid to 2.5 gallons or less.  This will concentrate the flavor.  When the process is over, pour the stock through a fine-meshed sieve once more into several large pans placed atop cooling racks.  Place a fan to blow on the stock and bring it down to less than 45°F as quickly as possible; then transfer into Styrofoam containers with lids or some other sanitized storage containers with lids and label as to the contents, the date, and the amount and freeze for use at a later date.

This is the traditional way to make beef broth, a must-have ingredient for kitchens whether at home or professionally.  Always keep stock on hand as you never know when you will need it to make soup, sauces, or for use in cooking meats such as beef and veal.

---------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

Well, there we go!  Day One is over and done!  I’m very happy that you all joined me today as it’s always fun to come in and write some blogs and then disappear into the ozone layer once more.  Foodservice is one busy industry and believe me, I never get tired of doing what it is I do, it’s a real passion of mine that I have instilled in not only my employees and coworkers but my kids, too.  It is the duty of every single foodservice professional to train the next generation to pick up and to run with the torch when we’re no longer able to do so.  I love what I do and do hope that it shows and hope that you will join me this week and leave comments.  Blogging is about dialogue and dialogue is what keeps the world from being so on the edge all of the time. Anyhow,  I will close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by the DOORS and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com.  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

PEACE!

Olaf Bologolo

CEC, ACF, Washington State Chefs Association, Retired 


This is a photo of me taken at an ACF Convention back in the early 1960's when I was a representative from our California chapter. Anyhow, I'm a great deal older than this picture now but that's what we're doing, sharing OLD pictures of all of us. I'm still a handsome guy, however!

---30---

END Commentary for Monday, February 20, 2012 by Chef Olaf Bologolo.



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef Olaf Bologolo.



Recipe created by Chef Olaf Bologolo on June 21, 1974 in Wasco, CA.

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This is #1366 a 12” x 16" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Laguna Shores" It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures VI
                                                                             




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