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Saturday, February 18, 2012

“Coffee Shop Favorites, Pt. XVI: ‘Braised Suisse Steak ala Jardinière—so Good, the Great French Chef Auguste Escoffier would be Wowed by It!’ by Chef Goldie “Goldfish” McNamara”



Today, we begin presenting another of the Los Angeles bands for your listening pleasure—the DOORS.  They have always been among the top bands of the psychedelic era thanks to the presence and voice of Jim Morrison and their sound.  They were unique in their style and are still as good today as they were then.  We are very proud to present them!  Their SECOND album—“Strange Days”—was released on September 25, 1967 and though not quite as successful as their debut album earlier in the year, yesterday’s “The Doors,” is still one of the all-time classic rock albums. [Unfortunately, the link may no longer be possible due to the fact that the Amazon.com Associates’ Program’s status is up in the air due to the fact that our home base is in California—you can still go there and BUY it!] Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.







                                                                             

Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 308 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!



                                                                                           


STINKBUG 2012

                                                                                    





Chef Goldie “Goldfish” McNamara

END Commentary 02-19-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,678.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Sunday, February 19, 2012 by Chef Goldie “Goldfish” McNamara

COFFEE SHOP FAVORITES, PT. XVI

Coffee Shop Favorites, Pt. XVI: ‘Braised Suisse Steak ala Jardinière—so Good, the Great French Chef Auguste Escoffier would be Wowed by It!’ by Chef Goldie “Goldfish” McNamara



Bakersfield, CA, 02-19-2012 Su: Today, we conclude with our final installment in the Coffee Shop Favorites’ series for the time-being by making a wonderful Swiss steak using cubed beef steaks.  Our recipe is cooked with tender loving care and when all is said and done, it will amaze you with both its beauty and its simplicity.  I love braised dishes as they always allow us to transform not-so-tender cuts of beef into amazingly tender entrees that even Grandma and Grandpa can enjoy with their dentures.  It’s a good thing to be able to utilize the tougher cuts of beef as if we didn’t, we’d lose most of the animal.  Normally, when the butcher or the sous chef is cutting the meat, he or she has a pan with different trays in it in which they put their different pieces of trim: (1) lard for use in the deep-fat fryer; (2) large pieces of beef for cubed steaks; (3) slightly smaller pieces for use in brochettes and shish kebabs; (4) smaller pieces for use in tips and stir-fries; (5) even smaller pieces than the last for ground meats such as (a) hamburger or (b) a coarser ground for chili meat.  Sometimes, the butcher will take some of the larger pieces and with the use of the tenderizing machine, will run a couple of them together through the twin whirling blades and out will come one homogenous piece of meat, ala the cubed beef steak for use in chicken fried steaks, Swiss steaks, and cubed steaks and eggs.  Without that piece of equipment, we wouldn’t be able to maximize our food cost and would lose out as you do at home because there is no workable home version of a tenderizer that I know of for personal use.  That means, you have to buy your cubed steaks at the store for a slightly higher price than they should be worth.  You can always buy better cuts like small top sirloins and using a masticating hammer, pound them into submission but not everyone enjoys doing that.  To each—their own!

  Our Swiss steaks will be braised with lots of liquid and again in a brown sauce formed from the ingredients in the pan.  Always be sure to make top quality beef stock of your own or purchase the best bases, Better-than-Bouillon-brand that’s available at specialty stores open to the general public that handle restaurant and professional foodservice products.   It’s a good thing to know how to make beef stock and I think I will include that recipe for you today so that you may do everything from scratch if you aren’t able to find the aforementioned beef base.  Here we go:

(#1052) BRAISED SUISSE STEAK ALA JARDINIÈRE





Yield:  4 servings / Mis-en-place: 1.25 hours +:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
The Suisse Steaks:
4
6-ounce
Beef cubed steaks

Seasoned flour

.5
Cup
Vegetable oil

Stinkbug seasoning to taste

2
Cups
Beef broth
Hot
.125
Cup
Lea & Perrins’ steak sauce

.125
Cup
Lea & Perrins’ Worcestershire sauce

The Roux:
3/8
Cup
Vegetable oil

.25
Cup
All-purpose flour

The Sauce:
2
Cups
Beef broth
Hot
.5
Cup
Almaden burgundy wine

.25
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.125
Teaspoon
Black pepper

.25
Teaspoon
Granulated garlic

.5
Teaspoon
Kitchen Bouquet®

The Garnishes:
2
Cups
Boiling water

.75
Cup
Peeled and julienned carrots
Blanched
.75
Cup
Peeled and julienned yellow onions
Blanched
.5
Cup
Julienned celery
Blanched
.5
Cup
Slivered scallions

.5
Cup
Sliced fresh mushrooms
Blanched
1
Tablespoon
Freshly minced parsley
Rinsed
Sprigs of fresh parsley
Rinsed
1-2
Cups
Broken Glass Garnish
(Recipe follows)



Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Preheat your standard oven to 375°F or your convection oven—fan “on”—to 325°F and have ready.  Blanch the vegetables in boiling salted water as this maintains their color and prepares them for immediate use.  Always drain them the minute they’re al dente-tender and then plunge them into ICE water to retard further cooking.

2.      Lightly pound the meat using a masticator and then dust in the seasoned flour (recipe follows), shaking off the excess; set aside.  Preheat your heavy-duty sautoir atop a medium flame and when it’s warm, spray it with PAM or some such other food release spray and add the first measure of oil.  Heat it up and when it’s sizzling, add the dusted cubed steaks, season to taste with the Stinkbug Seasoning (recipe follows the Seasoned Flour), and brown the meat on both sides, turning over only once or twice.

3.      Pour in the first measure of beef stock along with the steak and Worcestershire sauces.   Bring the liquid and meat within it to a boil, clamp on a lid or a cover, and place inside your preheated oven on the middle rack.  Cook for an hour or so or until the meat feels fork-tender when probed with a fork or knife. 

4.      Pull the pan out of the oven at the time and transfer the cubed steaks with a spatula onto a sheet pan.  Convey the liquid within the pan to a small saucepot and place over a medium-high flame; bring to a boil and when it is, thicken it with the roux you’ve made out of the second measure of vegetable oil and the all-purpose flour.  Whisk it in, allowing it to return to a full-bubbling-simmer, and when it has, keep there for 2-3 minutes, stirring almost constantly; then, drop heat to LOW, simmer for a few more minutes and proceed:

5.      Return the braised cubed steaks to their original pan and have ready.  Stir in the second two-cups of HOT beef broth along with the burgundy wine, salt, pepper, garlic, and Kitchen Bouquet®.  Stir to combine, thinning the sauce a bit, and then pour it over the meat.  Shake the pan gently to evenly distribute the liquid and then cover the pan with a lid or a piece of foil sprayed with PAM and return to your oven.  Drop the temperature by 25°F and continue braising the meat in the sauce for another 20-30 minutes or until the beef steaks are completely tender but NOT falling apart. 

6.      While the meat is finishing, have the two cups of boiling water at the ready along with the vegetables.  When time’s up, combine the blanched veggies in a bowl and cover with the boiling water.  Place the bowl inside the microwave for 30-60 seconds and heat them up; then, strain the vegetables out of the water and take to the oven: remove the lid on the meat and top with the garden-assortment of veggies—la Jardinière—and dust with the parsley flakes.  The braised Swiss steaks are now ready to serve.

7.      Generally, a dish like this is accompanied by mashed potatoes of some sort so we recommend garlic mashed potatoes, using new potatoes that you’ve peeled and boiled.  Also, serve with buttered peas and carrots—fresh—that you’ve prepared yourself.  Place a sprig of parsley alongside each portion on each of four serving plates and then sprinkle the Broken Glass Garnish around the perimeters of each plate and serve.

Here’s the Seasoned Flour:

(#232) SEASONED FLOUR





1. About 2.5 cups:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2.5
Cups
All-purpose flour

1
Tablespoon
Cayenne pepper

1
Tablespoon
White pepper

1.5
Tablespoon
Hungarian paprika

1.5
Teaspoons
Granulated garlic

1
Tablespoon
Kosher salt

2
Teaspoons
Parsley flakes




Method:

1.      Combine all ingredients together and store in an airtight jar, baggie, or whatever else and either keep at room temperature or in your freezer until needed.

It’s important to have a seasoned flour recipe for breading different foods and this is a good one.  You will use this recipe many times.

Here’s the Stinkbug Seasoning:

(#226) STINKBUG’S SEASONING





1. Yield: One cup of seasoning:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
Cup
Kosher salt

1
Tablespoon
Black pepper

1
Tablespoon
Granulated garlic

1.5
Teaspoon
Granulated onion

.5
Teaspoon
Hungarian paprika

1
Teaspoon
Summer savory

1
Teaspoon
Dry parsley flakes




Method:

1.      Combine all ingredients together in the bowl of an electric mixer and mix together well. Store in an airtight, DRY container.

This is a wonderful multi-purpose seasoning that can be used with most foods.

Finally, here’s the Broken Glass Garnish:

(#1305) BROKEN GLASS GARNISH





Yield: about 1 cup / Mis-en-place: about 20 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
.25
Cup
3/16” square-cut carrots
Rinsed
.25
Cup
3/16” square-cut red cabbage
Rinsed
.25
Cup
3/16” square celery
Rinsed
.25
Cup
3/16” square cut red bell pepper
Rinsed



Method:

1.      Rinse cabbage well, and then toss all ingreds together. Let them dry a little bit at room temp then keep on the cold line. I will tell you when to utilize this garnish which is a very attractive one; it reminds me of the stars in the heavens.

This is a very important garnish that you will use on all sorts of things so keep it available at all times.

So, when all put together, you have a marvelous dish that everyone knows and loves, only in a classic, more French form that Master Chef Auguste Escoffier would have been proud to have called his own!

Here’s the Beef Stock formula from long, long ago:

(#213) BASIC BEEF STOCK





Yield:  2.5 gallons  / Mis-en-place: 48 hours:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
5
#
Beef bones (like prime rib bones, etc.)

5
#
Reserved steak trim (mostly fat)

2
Cups
Burgundy

2.5
#
Bouquet garni (recipe #204)

2
Tablespoons
Black peppercorns

2
Tablespoons
Dry thyme

1
Tablespoon
Top quality beef base

4
Gallons
Cold water

2
#
Chopped carrots

2
#
Chopped celery with leaves and roots

2
#
Chopped yellow onions

1
#
Chopped red onions

1
#
Chopped leeks, scallions, and shallots

1
Bunch
Parsley with stems

2
Bulbs
Whole garlic

4
Each
Bay leaves

10
Each
Whole cloves

The Finish:
2
Cups
Worcestershire sauce




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work!  Preheat your standard oven to 450°F or your convection oven—fan “on”—to 400°F.  Place the beef bones into a roasting pan and add the fat.  Place inside the hot oven and roast them until they’re beginning to show signs of charcoal on the pan’s floor and they’re getting roasted.  Drop the heat by 50°F and continue roasting them until a great deal of oil’s been rendered; drain off and reserve this oil for use in making roux. 

2.      Pour the wine into the pan to deglaze it.  Scrape the charcoal off of the bottom with a kitchen spoon making sure to loosen all of it.  Turn off the oven and transfer the bones along with the charcoalized material into a large stock pot and cover with the water.  Add the rest of the ingredients and bring the pot to a boil; when it has, keep it there for 4-5 minutes and then lower the heat to the lowest of lows and simmer for 24-36 hours, checking the level of the liquid occasionally. 

3.      As it simmers, skim off any oil that rises to the surface as well as foam and discard it.  Keep an eye on the pot so that it never runs out of liquid but if you have the flame on LOW, it shouldn’t.  When everything appears to be cooked to mush, pour the broth through a chinois lined with wax paper and another chinois placed atop it.  Remove all debris and residue and discard.  Return the stock to the stove and complete the process:

4.      Return to a boil and add the Worcestershire sauce.  Keep there for several minutes and then lower the flame to low and reduce the liquid to 2.5 gallons or less.  This will concentrate the flavor.  When the process is over, pour the stock through a fine-meshed sieve once more into several large pans placed atop cooling racks.  Place a fan to blow on the stock and bring it down to less than 45°F as quickly as possible; then transfer into Styrofoam containers with lids or some other sanitized storage containers with lids and label as to the contents, the date, and the amount and freeze for use at a later date.

This is the traditional way to make beef broth, a must-have ingredient for kitchens whether at home or professionally.  Always keep stock on hand as you never know when you will need it to make soup, sauces, or for use in cooking meats such as beef and veal.

---------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

That’s it for me!  Tomorrow, Chef Olaf Bologolo will be coming in to take his turn behind the computer keyboard and screen to knock out his specialties.  I know you’re all excited about that because Olaf is one of the best guys around, he’s funny, he always has good stories to share, and if he’s sober, he can knock out recipes for hours!  I remember our trip around Kern County last year when we all went on our Magical Mystery Tour of sorts by bus throughout the county.  Most of us have seen some, if not all of it but for others who don’t live here anymore or are new to the Elemental News of the Day family, it was a first-time experience.  The good thing is, we know practically every single bar, tavern and watering hole from the far western end of the county to the east, and from the desolate north to the mountainous south.  In between and along the way, we stopped at many restaurants and had marvelous dinners when we told them who we are.  I remember eating Swiss Steak in Inyokern and let me tell you, it was one of the best recipes I’ve ever tasted and most no one ever goes to the town of Inyokern, located in the northeastern corner of Kern County.  But that’s the idea: wherever one goes, they’re a food tourist and that, my friends, is what life is all about.  Well, I had a lovely time, see you in five or six months!   I will close with this impassioned plea—please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by the DOORS and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com.  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!  

Thank you!

Goldfish

Goldie “Goldfish” McNamara

Cook IV Institutional Chef, CWC, ACF Chefs’ Association of the San Joaquin Valley CA123


This is me back in 1977 when I was working at the Hilton Inn in Bakersfield, CA, on Rosedale Highway. In the 1980’s, it was the Red Lion Inn but back then, I was the night sous chef and ran the cook's line at the age of 24. I’ve had the privilege of having worked in states such as Texas, Arizona, and elsewhere in California but have always returned to Bakersfield.  Currently, I am at one of the five country clubs.

---30---

END Commentary for Sunday, February 19, 2012 by Chef Goldie “Goldfish” McNamara.



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef Goldie “Goldfish” McNamara.



Recipe created by Chef Goldie “Goldfish” McNamara on November 04, 1983 in Bakersfield, CA.

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STINKBUG AT THE COUNTDOWN TO THE END DAYS


                                                                                                                                    
                                                                                   
This is #1365 a 20” x 16" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Rock! Rock! Rock!" It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures VI
                                                                              




PLEASE NOTE: WE HAVE BEEN STYMIED BY THE CALIFORNIA LAW TAXING THE INTERNET AND UNTIL WE CAN BEGIN POSTING LINKS TO AMAZON.COM AGAIN, YOU WILL HAVE TO GO THERE YOURSELF.  BE SURE TO WRITE GOVERNOR JERRY BROWN AND TELL HIM HE’S WRONG FOR WHAT HE’S DOING.  HE’S CRIPPLING BUSINESS BUT OF COURSE, HE KNOWS THAT! THANK YOU, THE ELEMENTAL NEWS OF THE DAY.















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Tags:

Goldie “Goldfish” McNamara, Coffee Shop Favorites, Classic Cooking, The Doors, Beef, Braised Dishes, American Coffee Shop Classics, Beef and Veal, Homecooking, Auguste Escoffier, French Cooking,










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