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Monday, January 2, 2012

“Soup Seminar, Pt. XXI: ‘Green Bean Chowder—a Wonderful and Profitable Way to clean out the Icebox’ by Chef Elvin C. McCardle”

The Grateful Dead’s one-hundred-and-twenty-third album of sorts as it’s a solo effort by Jerry Garcia, the songs of which were all included in the Dead’s live act is the second solo effort, “Reflections,” released in 1976. Most all of the songs were standard material in the band’s live shows and also in his solo performances with various entities.  We love it and think you will, too, so go out and buy it by using the handy link to Amazon.com, the world’s largest online retailer and get it now! You won’t be disappointed!  Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.






                                                                              
Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 354 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!



                                                                                   


                                      STINKBUG 2012


                                                                                


Chef Elvin C. McCardle

END Commentary 01-03-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,253.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Tuesday, January 03, 2012 by Chef Elvin C. McCardle

SOUP SEMINAR, PT XXI—GREEN BEAN CHOWDER

Soup Seminar, Pt. XXI: ‘Green Bean Chowder—a Wonderful and Profitable Way to clean out the Icebox’ by Chef Elvin C. McCardle



Bakersfield, CA, 01-03-2012 T: After New Year’s celebrations have come and gone, the pressing thing most professional chefs find themselves burdened with is utilizing the leftovers that have gathered since the holidays.  Many times, in a country club or in a hotel, the holidays mean tons of money pours in if we do our jobs correctly but there’s even more money to be made if we utilize our leftovers, scraps, and odd’s and end’s to our best abilities.  This is what separates the successful chefs from the less-successful: profitable utilization of whatever’s left in the walk-in refrigerators.  The same principles that apply to the professional model can be adapted to the home front which means less grocery expenditures for one week following the Christmas and New Year’s holidays if the home cook does things right.  The average grocery expenditure for a family of four is generally between $80-$100 and if you’re like me or anyone else, wouldn’t it be nice to save an extra $100 in the month of January?

            Nowadays, many of the younger chefs, especially the so-called immigrants who have encroached upon almost every industry in the nation that requires a certain degree of semi-skilled labor, have absolutely no idea how to run a good food cost.  They know how to cook, how to make rudimentary menus, and how to order products but when it comes to knowing how to run the business properly so that their owner(s) is/are making money, they have absolutely no clue.  While the owner feels he or she or they are making money by having low labor costs and perhaps no benefits to fund, they’re losing it because the semi-skilled kitchen manager is throwing stuff out in the garbage from which profits could be wrung or worse are sending it home with their employees and their families to enjoy.  To me, it’s an irritating fact that the government of the United States would care to make things so bad for its citizens by not closing the border and allowing America to get back to what it does best: making money in a way that’s good for all legal citizens.  In this, almost all of us are in agreement with one another: we want the foodservice industry in particular and America in general to be a place in which money can be made successfully which will broaden the tax base and bring in more revenue and all the time the border is unclosed, we’re screwed. I believe that a change in November will bring about this reality.

            Our soup for today is Green Bean Chowder, a soup that came about because the restaurant in which I was working had a glut of green beans and white rose potatoes leftover after one busy weekend.  We needed a way to utilize all of these ingredients and ended up being creative and making a chowder out of all of the remnants.  Of course, every day, we make about twelve gallons of soup which in this situation have been broken down to a smaller amount but if the amount presented here is too small, by all means, double or triple it.  It’s a nice thing to give soup to one’s neighbors or to send it to work or school with the breadwinner or the kids so see what you can do and how creative you can be in finding a place to dispose of it.  But I can assure you this: everyone will think you made it especially for them with no ulterior motives (like getting rid of leftovers) and will be singing your praises aloud for days on end.  You will see what I mean, my friends, so if you’re ready, let’s get it on!

(#582) GREEN BEAN CHOWDER





Yield:  about 3 quarts / Mis-en-place: 60 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
The Stock:
2
Quarts
Ham stock

.5
Cup
Chopped ham

1
Piece
Bay leaf

The Potatoes:
1
#
Peeled and diced white rose potatoes

1.5
Cup
Chicken stock

1
Teaspoon
Whole thyme

The Potato Water:
1
Cup
Reserved potato water

The Green Beans:
3
Cups
Chopped fresh green beans

2
Quarts
Chicken broth

The Soup:
.5
Cup
Melted butter

.25
Cup
Bacon fat

1
Cup
Diced carrots

1.5
Cups
Diced yellow onions

.5
Cup
Diced celery

1.5
Cups
Diced leeks

5/8
Cup
All-purpose flour

The Tomatoes:
1.25
Cups
Diced tomatoes with juice

The Seasonings and the Finish:
.125
Cup
Freshly minced parsley

1.125
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.5
Teaspoon
White pepper

.5
Teaspoon
Minced garlic

.5
Teaspoon
Lemon juice

.75
Teaspoon
Dry mustard

.25
Teaspoon
Ground cumin

1.125
Teaspoons
Whole thyme

3/8
Teaspoon
Pulverized rosemary

1
Each
Bay leaf

1
Cup
Heavy cream

Hungarian paprika

Freshly minced parsley flakes
Rinsed of color



Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work!

2.      Combine the ingredients listed underneath “the Stock” in a large saucepot and place over a medium-flame; bring to a boil and when it is, drop the flame to a simmer.

3.      Meanwhile, in another pot, combine the ingredients listed underneath “the Potatoes” and place over a medium flame.  Bring it to a boil and then immediately lower to a low simmer.  Cook the potatoes slowly, keeping an eye on them.  White Rose potatoes have great flavor but are somewhat delicate so keep an eye on them.  When you have them cooked, drain and reserve the cooking liquid, reserving at least a cup.  Should you need to add liquid to them while they’re cooking, do it.

4.      When the potatoes are cooked, plunge them into a bowl of ice water to retard further cooking.  Leave them there until called for.  When you need them, drain and discard the cold water.

5.      In a third pot, cook the green beans in the liquid until tender.  Drain them, discarding the broth, and transfer them into bowl of ice water to chill, too.  You want to stop the cooking process for both them and the potatoes and this is very important. 

6.      Now, in a large skillet or round pan with a heavy-bottom, melt the bacon fat with the butter and when fairly warm, add the FOUR vegetables—carrots, onions, celery, and leeks—and sauté until tender.  Add the flour and cook this roux over a moderate flame, stirring frequently. 

7.      Combine the stock in the first pot with the reserved potato water and add the tomatoes to it along with the spices and then bring it to a boil.  Raise the temperature of the roux pot to medium-high, whisking constantly, and gradually pour in the boiling liquid.  Whisk furiously at this point, being sure to scrape the sides and bottom of the pot to loosen all bits and pieces of roux lest it burn or remain as blobs until a medium-thick soup has formed.  Continue whisking for a few minutes more and then lower the flame to a low simmer.

8.      Add the cream and thicken the soup with it while adding flavor at the same time.  Taste the soup’s flavor and readjust the seasonings if necessary, primarily with salt, pepper, and garlic.  Let the soup perk over a very low flame allowing it to develop flavor, personality, and charm. 

9.      When it’s time to serve your soup, heat the potatoes and green beans in the microwave oven and then transfer them into the soup.  Should you need to add additional liquid, do so with HOT water or stock.  Then, your soup is ready to serve.

10.  Serve the soup in individual soup bowls and sprinkle each with a little Hungarian paprika and freshly minced parsley.  Accompany it with French bread and butter, a salad, and salsa if so inclined. 

11.  Leftovers must always be cooled down below 45°F as quickly as possible before being refrigerated.  Place them in a shallow pan and onto a cooling rack and stir occasionally to allow the heat to escape.  Always heat leftovers to 165°F or more to prevent any chance of foodborne illness from happening. Store in a sanitized airtight container for no more than 2-3 days at most; after that, either freeze or discard it.  If you know you’re not going to use it right away, place it into a freezer Zip-Loc bag and freeze it as soon as it’s properly cooled.

This is an excellent soup and a great way to utilize leftover green beans, potatoes, and ham.  It’s also a very tasty meal and doesn’t take a great deal of time to prepare if you have everything on hand. It’s a wonderful meal for a winter’s evening.

            Well, the trick is to always take care of leftovers the minute you have them leftover.  If you have cooked green beans, rinse the butter and the seasonings from them and then place them in a colander—covered with a paper towel—in your refrigerator.  If they’re uncooked, cook them al dente—to the tooth, as we say—in simmering, salted water and then immediately drain, discarding the liquid which in this case is somewhat pungent and plunging the vegetable into ice water to retard further cooking.  Do the same thing with the potatoes and in their case, you might save the cooking liquid as it’s both rich and a natural thickener of sorts.  It’s also good in clam chowder and of course, cream of potato soup.  What we want you to do are to think two things: (1) think economically and (2) think sanitarily.  Always prepare foods in ways that will wrench the most amount of money from them and always do it in ways that won’t cause foodborne illness to either your customers or your family.  If something doesn’t LOOK GOOD, chances are, it isn’t so discard it.  Don’t be a die-hard chef like some I’ve worked with who will take chances with the health of their customers just to make a buck.  Be careful and be smart.

---------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

I think we are getting the New Year off to a good start, friends, and as 2012 is a year of possible significance, all I can say is that I am glad that I am here to see whatever happens in December.  I want to be able to tell my grandchildren that “I was there on December 21st, 2012 and survived it!”  Yes, indeed, it is a fascinating thing to be awaiting a coming event that no one knows will occur or not.  I enjoy speculating on the subject as it is rather fascinating and I have never discounted the prophecies of the ancient Native Americans—I truly feel that the original Americans as a whole are very much in tune with nature and with the supernatural world surrounding us.  Sadly, however, I was disappointed when the writings of Carlos Castenada were proven to be false—I truly believed in the stories of Don Juan, the Yaqui sorcerer.  Anyhow—all we ask of you, dear readers, is that you please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by the Grateful Dead and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com.  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!    

Thank you!

Elvin C. McCardle

Elvin C. McCardle

American Culinary Federation, Inc., CWC

_____________________________________________________________________


This is me as a young chef back in the 1970's when I was working as a sous chef at a resort hotel over on the coast around Ventura Beach, California. I began my career working as a busboy in 1963, move to washing pots in 1965, became a chef's apprentice in 1969 and have been a career professional ever since. I am still involved in professional foodservice as a consultant for food and beverage professionals.

---30---

END Commentary for Tuesday, January 03, 2012 by Chef Elvin C. McCardle.



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef Elvin C. McCardle



Story created by Chef Elvin C. McCardle on August 10, 1984 in Ventura, CA.

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STINKBUG AT THE COUNTDOWN TO THE END DAYS


                                                                                                                                   

                                                                                      
This is #1332 a 24” x 30" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Breaking Surf." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

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