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Thursday, January 26, 2012

“Old-Fashioned Home Cooking, Pt. XII: ‘Cinnamon-and-Mustard-Rubbed Roast Pork Loin with Baked Apple Topping—the Best in the West’ by Chef V. Vicky Mazarotti”



Our new band for the next month or so is one of the best bands to come out of Los Angeles in the 1960’s: the Byrds.  They went from Electric Folk to Psychedelic to Country Music and shined each and every step of the way.  Their twelfth album—“Byrdmaniax”—was released on June 03, 1971 and is still as wonderful today as it was then, more than 40 years ago.  We love it and think you will, too, so go out and buy it by using the handy link to Amazon.com, the world’s largest online retailer and get it now! You won’t be disappointed! [Unfortunately, the link may no longer be possible due to the fact that the Amazon.com Associates’ Program’s status is up in the air due to the fact that our home base is in California—you can still go there and BUY it!] Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.



                                                                      

Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 330 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!


                                                                                     


STINKBUG 2012


                                                                               

Chef V. Vicky Mazarotti

END Commentary 01-27-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,060.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Friday, January 27, 2012 by Chef V. Vicky Mazarotti

OLD-FASHIONED HOME COOKING, PT. XII

Old-Fashioned Home Cooking, Pt. XII: ‘Cinnamon-and-Mustard-Rubbed Roast Pork Loin with Baked Apple Topping—the Best in the West’ by Chef V. Vicky Mazarotti



Bakersfield, CA, 01-27-2012 F: Yesterday, we made a delicious standing rib roast and today, we’re going to do a roast pork loin that we’re going to rub with cinnamon, Gulden’s brown mustard, and other herbs and spices.  We are going to roast it low and slow and make it so doggone tender that everyone will be singing your praises to high heaven—with the exception of your Muslim and Jewish friends! Anyhow, pork loins are widely available nowadays and are boneless to boot which makes for a nicer finished product with more meat and less waste.  Tenderloins are just what the name implies: tender and that’s a good thing because this one is meant to be a delicious counterpoint to the roast beef of yesterday.  We could have run both of these dishes for a Christmas spectacular of our own but I wasn’t the one doing the holiday spread this year so we’ll do it now, what do you say?  

Pork loins are sensitive things, they require more babying than the beef roasts because they’re not overloaded with a lot of internal fat which means that after searing it off in the oven, we need to drop the temperature to a lower level and let it poke along at its own pace.  We need to baste it as it cooks and then with the addition of a baked apple topping, we will sweeten it up and tenderize it some more because a meat such as this one always requires a nice sweet sauce to make it that much more enjoyable.  By the time we’re done with this puppy, you’ll be singing your own praises prior to your family singing yours.  Just take your time, rub it ahead of time and allow it to sit a day or two in the refrigerator.  If you want to really soften it up, be sure to add some Adolph’s meat tenderizer to your rub mixture as this will make it almost fork-tender!

CINNAMON-AND-MUSTARD-RUBBED ROAST PORK LOIN



Yield:  6 servings / Mis-en-place: 2-2.5 hours:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
The Pork Loin:
1
4#
Boneless pork loin

.5
Cup
Brown mustard

.5
Cup
Vegetable oil

1
Tablespoon
Ground cinnamon

1
Tablespoon
Lawrey’s seasoned salt

1
Teaspoon
Lawrey’s seasoned pepper

1.5
Teaspoons
Granulated garlic

.5
Teaspoon
Ground nutmeg

.5
Teaspoon
Whole thyme

.25
Teaspoon
Ground bay leaves

Yellow onion scraps

Celery scraps

Carrot scraps

Leek scraps

Parsley scraps

1
Cup
Vegetable oil

The Stock:
1.5
Quarts
Boiling water

The Pork Gravy:
.5
Cup
Vegetable oil or pork drippings

.5
Cup
All-purpose flour

.5
Teaspoon
White pepper

.5
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.25
Teaspoon
Whole thyme

1
Teaspoon
Whole sage

3
Cups
Pork stock
Hot
The Finish:
2
Each
Oranges, sliced

Fresh parsley sprigs
Rinsed
1
Tablespoon
Freshly minced parsley flakes
Rinsed



Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Preheat standard oven to 400°F or a convection oven—fan “on”—to 350°F.  Spray a large roasting pan with PAM or some such other food release spray and have ready. Pile up the vegetable scraps and make a bed of sorts in the bottom of the roasting pan—set aside.

2.      Combine the mustard, vegetable oil, cinnamon, seasoned salt and pepper, garlic, nutmeg, thyme, and bay leaves together in the bowl of an electric mixer equipped with a paddle attachment and when done, rub the pork with this mixture on all sides.  Place the pork loin atop the bed of vegetables and place inside your preheated oven.  At the same time, place 1.5-2-quarts of water on the stove in a saucepot and place over a medium flame—heat it up.

3.      Cook at the high temperature for 15 minutes; then, drop the temperature by 25°F and begin basting the pork with the one-cup measure of vegetable oil.  Roll the meat over on a couple of occasions, and continue basting it.  After about 30 minutes, add two-cups of hot water to the pan and cover it with a lid.  Continue cooking until the meat has reached the temperature of 165°F—the temperature at which ALL pork products must be cooked—before pulling the pan out of the oven. Note: a four-pound loin will probably be cooked within two-to-two-and-a-half-hours’ time.

4.      Remove the pork from the pan and place on a sheet pan and keep warm in a lowered oven, covered with foil.  Add the rest of the hot water to the pot and bring it to a boil after removing whatever drippings have accumulated in the bottom.  Reduce it to the required 3-cups for the Pork Gravy and strain out the vegetables and impurities before using for gravy.

5.      To make the sauce: In a heavy-duty saucepot sprayed with PAM or some such other food release spray, combine the oil and flour over a medium-flame to form a roux. Cook for several minutes, stirring almost constantly.  Add the seasonings.

6.      Next, pour in the pork stock gradually whisking all the while until incorporated.  Raise the temperature and continue stirring as it comes to a bubble and forms into a medium-consistency sauce. Then, lower heat and keep warm.

7.      Slice the pork at serving time and then put oranges slice around it on the platter followed by parsley sprigs.  Dribble a little bit of the prepared gravy over the top of the meat and garnish with a sprinkle of parsley flakes.  Serve the rest of the gravy in a sauceboat at the table and accompany with mashed red garlic potatoes and green beans cooked with bacon and onions.  You’ve got yourself one heck of a meal!

Roast pork is one of those autumn and winter treats that is good at any time of the year.  Always look for the best, freshest pork loins in the grocery store and rub with oil and spices a day ahead of the cooking date to tenderize and season it in advance.  This is a delicious meal and everyone—save those who don’t eat pork—will be singing your praises!

Okay, let’s do the apple topping:

APPLE PIE FILLING





Yield:  about one-plus quarts / Mis-en-place: about 1.5 hours:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
3.25
#
Frozen pie apples

.75
Quart
Apple juice

1
Cup
Granulated sugar

.75
Teaspoon
Table salt

3/8
Teaspoon
Almond extract

1.125
Teaspoons
Ground nutmeg

3/8
Teaspoon
Ground cinnamon

.75
Teaspoon
Lemon juice

3/8
Cup
Clear gel or cornstarch

1
Each
Bay leaf




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Find the best frozen apples that you can that are packed in metal tins with juice as they make the BEST cobbler/pie filling even more so than fresh.  Fresh is fine but you have to both core, stem, and peel them and then poach them in a saucepot with TWO quarts of water in order to make the required amount of cherry juice.  

2.      Have the apples set aside and combine the two liquid measures together and then place in a large saucepot and place over a medium-high flame.  Combine the rest of the ingredients together using an electric mixer equipped with a whip attachment. 

3.      When the liquid is boiling, pour some of it into the mixer and rotate the whip on slow speed until the mixture is liquefied and free of lumps.  When it is, add the remaining liquid to it and mix well.

4.      Place a heavy-duty, large saucepot over a medium-high flame and spray with PAM or some such other food release spray.  Place a fine-meshed sieve atop it and pour the liquid mixture through it.  Force through any blobs of gel, sugar, or spice and then raise the flame to high.  Throw the bay leaf into the pot, too, and bring to a boil, whisking constantly.

5.      As it heats up, it will begin to thicken and you must whisk continually lest you miss a corner and scorch the gel.  Be sure to scrape the sides, corners, top and bottom to keep the mixture from scorching.  Continue whisking until the mixture has thickened and has gone from cloudy to clear. When it’s both of those two requirements, the gel is done so remove it from the flame and set aside.

6.      Add the apples and stir them in—gently—with a spoon, coating them with the gel as well as possible. Serve this mixture either on the side of the roast pork in a bowl or place it on top with the gravy on the side. 

This is an excellent baked apple topping that was one of the first I learned back in the early 1970’s and have kept it unchanged for the past 40 years or so. It is one that every cook and chef needs to have in his or her repertoire. 

Final note: always cool leftovers to below 45°F as quickly as possible as this is the low end of the Danger Zone (45°F-140°F) and do so in clean pans.  Cover when cool and refrigerate.  They’ll remain fresh in your fridge for several days but must be used within 4-5 or discarded.  If not going to eat the leftovers right away and you know it, FREEZE them.

---------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

My, my, my! Friday has come and gone and now, it’s all downhill before I’m out of here! Thank God for small things, right? As I mentioned yesterday, business is hopping out here in Taft, California, and that’s a good thing.  Our oilfields are still in production and its full steam ahead.  We have high employment out here and it’d be even better if there weren’t so many illegals sneaking in. I know some of my other comrades have made mention of this topic and all I can say is, “I hope whoever wins the White House in November will do something about it; are you listening, President Obama?”  I know I shouldn’t complain but hey, when my grandchildren have a hard time finding employment in other parts of the state, I feel the need to voice my opinions just like everyone else around here. I believe that Border Security is one of the most important topics in the general election and if you agree with me, say something to someone else and maybe we can bring about a change.  Anyhow—all we ask of you, dear readers, is that you please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by the Byrds and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com.  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!    

Thank you!

V. Vicky Mazarotti

V. “Vicky” Mazarotti
ACF, CWC, CPC, International Association of Culinary Professionals IACP.


This is me as a young chef back in the 1970's when I was working at a hotel in San Francisco. I had the opportunity to work in many different parts of the country and worked my way up the culinary ladder to become a top chef. I am both a Certified Working Chef and a Certified Pastry Chef and am a member of the American Culinary Federation, the world's top authority on everything connected to cooking.

---30---

END Commentary for Friday, January 27, 2012 by Chef V. Vicky Mazarotti.



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef V. Vicky Mazarotti.



Recipe created by Chef V. Vicky Mazarotti on December 15, 1974 in San Francisco, CA.

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This is #12 a 20” x 24" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Pheasant Country." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

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