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Sunday, January 22, 2012

“Old-Fashioned Home Cooking, Pt. VIII: ‘Veal Collops with Sauce Brune aux Fines Herbs—an Updated Version of What Grandmother used to Make’ by Chef V. Vicky Mazarotti”



Our new band for the next month or so is one of the best bands to come out of Los Angeles in the 1960’s: the Byrds.  They went from Electric Folk to Psychedelic to Country Music and shined each and every step of the way.  Their eighth album—“Dr. Byrds and Mr. Hyde”—was released on March 05, 1969 and is still as wonderful today as it was then, more than 40 years ago.  We love it and think you will, too, so go out and buy it by using the handy link to Amazon.com, the world’s largest online retailer and get it now! You won’t be disappointed! [Unfortunately, the link may no longer be possible due to the fact that the Amazon.com Associates’ Program’s status is up in the air due to the fact that our home base is in California—you can still go there and BUY it!] Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.




                                                                                     
Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 334 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!


                                                                                   


STINKBUG 2012


                                                                                

Chef V. Vicky Mazarotti

END Commentary 01-22-2012

Copyright © 2012 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,233.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Monday, January 23, 2012 by Chef V. Vicky Mazarotti

OLD-FASHIONED HOME COOKING, PT. VIII

Old-Fashioned Home Cooking, Pt. VIII: ‘Veal Collops with Sauce Brune aux Fines Herbs—an Updated Version of What Grandmother used to Make’ by Chef V. Vicky Mazarotti



Bakersfield, CA, 01-23-2012 M: Well, hello! It’s been FOUR months since last we were together and all I can say is, “It’s about time!”  It’s hard to imagine what with our new schedule of working one week and then going about our merry way that we have four months to do the things we need to do in life and then get back together and have fun!  

I live out in Taft, California, one of Kern County’s larger towns that’s experienced phenomenal growth over the past 20 years.  Taft is in western Kern, on the way to the California coastline in Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties.  Taft has had some famous restaurants such as the once very-popular White Elephant which sadly closed down quite a few years ago.  There are still many other fine restaurants there like OT’s Cook House, the Tumbleweed Café, and Chicken of Oz where a good friend of ours, Chefs Nels McDonald is the chef.  We also have ethnic restaurants like New Ong’s Chinese Restaurant and the Original Hacienda Grill.  We’re very proud of our foodservice opportunities out there and the fact that we’re growing each and every day is a wonderful thing.  The good thing about our city is the fact that even though it’s growing larger day by day, it’s still got that small town feel to it.  The restaurant in which I work is doing quite well and that’s heartening to me and all of my fellow employees. 

So, why did I come to Taft?  Well, I became tired of the Bakersfield scene which is being trashed by the addition of so many chain restaurants and this caused me to look around for better opportunities and prospects.  A friend of mine lives and works in Taft and asked me to come visit and so I did and when we went to her place of employment, Sagebrush Annie’s, I found myself falling in love with not only the people but the community as well.  I decided that since my time was more or less up in Bakersfield, my husband and I could take the trip and move our family to Taft.  He works in the oilfields in the Fellows area so that was perfect for him and here we are!  I am pleased to say that “I live in Taft!”

Our recipe for today is a classic dish from long ago, “Veal Collops.” What the hell are ‘veal collops’ I hear you say: well, they’re sort of like a breaded veal cutlet that’s bite-sized and pan-fried and then smothered in a brown herb sauce.  It’s a dish that my grandmother used to make long, long ago and it left a lasting impression upon me.  Sure, veal isn’t consumed with quite the same vigor as it once was in the United States but at some point, the pendulum will swing back and it will become popular once again.  Try this dish when you have time and are searching for something to enliven your dinner table or if you’re employed in foodservice, find a place for it on your menu and watch the customers go wild! Let’s make this dish:

(#251) SAUCE BRUNE AUX FINES HERBS


Yield:  6 servings / Mis-en-place: 12-16 hours:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2
Quarts 
Superior Veal stock

.25
Cup
Reserved beef drippings

3/8
Cup
All-purpose flour

2
Teaspoons
Kosher salt

1
Teaspoon
White pepper

1
Each
Bay leaf

2
Teaspoons
Minced parsley flakes

2
Teaspoons
Minced fresh chervil

2
Teaspoons
Sweet basil

1
Teaspoon
Tarragon

1
Teaspoon
Whole oregano




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Make stock from beef or veal bones.  Roast the bones in a 375°F standard oven or a 325°F convection oven—fan “on”—for at least two hours; be sure to add some vegetable oil and some vegetable scraps such as yellow onions, celery, leeks, and carrots.  Turn the bones over while they cook, taking great care to scrape up the caramelized deposits on the pan’s bottom.  When the bones are dark, pour off and strain the oil and reserve it; place the pot over a medium flame and cover with water.  Bring to a boil, keep there for 4-5 minutes, and then reduce the flame to very low and simmer the bones for an hour or so.  If you start with 5# of bones, cover them with a gallon of cold water and reduce it by half.

2.      When the stock has been created, pour it through cheesecloth-lined fine-meshed sieve into a sanitized bowl.  Refrigerate overnight (the reserved oil, too) and the next day, scrape off the fat cap on the surface of the stock.  Combine this with the reserved oil and heat it up: when it’s liquid, pour it through a strainer and remove the impurities—discard them.  Save this oil in a clean jar in your freezer after you’ve taken out the required .25-cup for the roux.

3.      Combine the oil with the flour in a small saucepot and cook over a very low flame until its dark brown, stirring frequently.  Meanwhile, place two quarts of the beef or veal stock in a large saucepot and reduce by half over a medium flame.  Add the bay leaf and the seasonings to it while you do this. 

4.      When you have ONE quart of liquid, whisk the liquid into the roux pot; raise the temperature so that it’s boiling and whisk furiously as you combine the mixture.  Allow it to boil for 1-2 minutes and then reduce the heat, add the herbs, and allow it to simmer over a very low flame for 4-5 minutes.  Check and readjust the seasonings as necessary.  Use this as your Sauce Brune enriched by herbs.

This is the basic brown sauce from which many others are built.  Always be sure to create a DARK roux for brown sauces and either a white or a blonde roux for lighter sauces.  You can keep this in the refrigerator or in your freezer for 1-2 weeks and then must discard it.  Here’s the Seasoned Flour recipe you will need:

SEASONED FLOUR

1. About 2.5 cups:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2.5
Cups
All-purpose flour

1
Tablespoon
Cayenne pepper

1
Tablespoon
White pepper

1.5
Tablespoon
Hungarian paprika

1.5
Teaspoons
Granulated garlic

1
Tablespoon
Kosher salt

2
Teaspoons
Parsley flakes




Method:

1.      Combine all ingredients together and store in an airtight jar, baggie, or whatever else and either keep at room temperature or in your freezer until needed.

It’s important to have a seasoned flour recipe for breading different foods and this is a good one.  You will use this recipe many times. Here’s the Stinkbug Seasoning:

(#246) STINKBUG’S SEASONING

1. Yield: One cup of seasoning:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
Cup
Kosher salt

1
Tablespoon
Black pepper

1
Tablespoon
Granulated garlic

1.5
Teaspoon
Granulated onion

.5
Teaspoon
Hungarian paprika

1
Teaspoon
Summer savory

1
Teaspoon
Dry parsley flakes




Method:

1.      Combine all ingredients together in the bowl of an electric mixer and mix together well. Store in an airtight, DRY container.

This is a wonderful multi-purpose seasoning that can be used with most foods.

Finally, here’s the main dish recipe:

VEAL COLLOPS


Yield:  4 servings / Mis-en-place: 12-16 hours (because of the sauce):


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
24
Ounces
Veal leg, roast, or loin, cut into 1” x 1” pieces

Seasoned flour

4
Each
Large AAA eggs

.5
Cup
Buttermilk

2
Teaspoons
Stinkbug seasoning

1
Teaspoon
Lawrey’s seasoned pepper

1
Teaspoon
Whole thyme

1
Teaspoon
Minced garlic

.5
Teaspoon
Whole marjoram

Panko, Japanese breadcrumbs

.5
Cup
Vegetable oil

1
Quart
Sauce Brune aux Fines Herbs

1
Tablespoon
Minced fresh parsley flakes

Fresh parsley sprigs




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! First of all, prepare the Sauce Brune aux Fines Herbs and have ready—you will need to do this the night before.

2.      Cut the veal from one of the cuts specified and then cut into 1” x 1” pieces, about the size of oysters.  Have the seasoned flour and the Panko breading ready.  Beat the eggs with the aid of an electric mixer and then add the buttermilk and blend well.  Force this mixture through a fine-meshed sieve into a large bowl.  Note: the breading station will be as follows: Bowl #1 will be the seasoned flour; Bowl #2 will be the eggwash mixture (to which you need to add the spices and herbs listed); and Bowl #3 will be the Panko breading.

3.      Preheat your standard oven to 325°F or a convection oven—fan “on”—to 300°F and have ready.

4.      Dip the veal collops into Bowl #1 and then dunk into Bowl #2; keep there for several minutes.  Then, transfer them to Bowl #3 and bread well, pushing flat with the palm of your hand.  As you do them in batches, remove them and place them onto a sheet pan lined with wax paper or plastic wrap; set aside.

5.      Using a large, heavy-bottomed skillet or two, heat the vegetable oil over a moderate flame after spraying them with PAM or some such other food release spray.  When the oil’s hot, begin frying the collops in batches and as you do them, transfer them to another sheet pan and place inside your preheated oven.  Cover them with wax paper or a pan lid.

6.      When all are done, place them into a baking dish and cover with the simmering Sauce Brune aux Fines Herbs.  Sprinkle the parsley flakes over all and allow them to seep in the sauce for several minutes; then, remove the collops and give approximately 3-5 pieces per serving on each of four plates.  We recommend that you serve them with a rice side dish of some sort like Rice Pilaf and that you angle the collops on the side of it.  Serve a vegetable of choice with them and then garnish the plates with fresh parsley sprigs.  Your veal collops are now ready to take to the table.

Veal Collops are an old way of serving breaded veal cutlets albeit updated with Panko breading which makes the dish phenomenal.  This is a classic dish from long ago, prepared by my grandmother when I was very young. Back in the day, people ate more veal than they do now so this was a standard dish in our home.  Making brown sauces is an important part of being a chef so it’s good that you know how to make this one—it’s a classic.

---------------------------------------------

As always, we have a great time around here and that is why we want all of you to become a part of the organization by submitting articles to us for inspection and full-credit.  It is a great thing if you would do this as it’s a symbiotic relationship: we give you the space to share your recipes and in return, you send us more and more people who will hopefully become dedicated followers of the END.  In this day and age of multi-diversity across the Internet, it is important that the voices of more and more people from all walks of the foodservice profession are heard—join us. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

Well, I’m glad I’m not too rusty from my long layoff.  It’s hard to imagine being off for four months and being busy with work, life, and other commitments.  I love what I do and enjoy writing blogs for Stinky—he’s such a wonderful guy and all.  But to come back after doing other stuff for four months almost seems like a lifetime, let me tell you.  We are so busy at our restaurant in Taft, California, that I never seem to have enough time to do all the things that need to be done.  It’s a matter of prioritizing one’s life like one’s profession and it always seems to work out.   Anyhow—all we ask of you, dear readers, is that you please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by the Byrds and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com.  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around!  Bye!    

Thank you!

V. Vicky Mazarotti

V. “Vicky” Mazarotti
ACF, CWC, CPC, International Association of Culinary Professionals IACP.


This is me as a young chef back in the 1970's when I was working at a hotel in San Francisco. I had the opportunity to work in many different parts of the country and worked my way up the culinary ladder to become a top chef. I am both a Certified Working Chef and a Certified Pastry Chef and am a member of the American Culinary Federation, the world's top authority on everything connected to cooking.

---30---

END Commentary for Monday, January 23, 2012 by Chef V. Vicky Mazarotti.



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was written by the one-and-only Chef V. Vicky Mazarotti.



Recipe created by Chef V. Vicky Mazarotti on September 02, 1974 in San Francisco, CA.

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STINKBUG AT THE COUNTDOWN TO THE END DAYS


                                                                                   
                                                                                                                                                               
This is #1352 an 11” x 14" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Riding Lessons." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

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Tags:

V. Vicky Mazarotti, Old-Fashioned Home-Cooking, Entrees, Veal Dishes, The Byrds, Famous Restaurant Recipes, Taft-California, Fine-Dining, Sauces, Stocks and Sauces, Brown Sauces, Herb Sauces, Good Food,










                                                                                       
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