Popular Posts

Friday, December 23, 2011

“Hawaiian and Polynesian Recipes, Part XV: Baked Opakapaka with Pineapple Hollandaise—Hawaiian and French Cuisines intermingled to create a Taste of Heaven”

The Grateful Dead’s one-hundred-and-thirteenth album, “Formerly the Warlocks—Hampton Coliseum, Hampton, VA, October 08-09, 1989,” was released on September 07, 2010 and was another great edition of the Retrospective Live Album Series! We love it and think you will, too, so go out and buy it by using the handy link to Amazon.com, the world’s largest online retailer and get it now! You won’t be disappointed!  Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.



HOLIDAY SEASON 2011



CHRISTMAS EVE! PEACE ON EARTH, GOOD WILL TO MEN


                                                                              
Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 364 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!


                                                                                     



                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                                              


Chef Cheryl La Tigre

END Commentary 12-24-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,268.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Saturday, December 24, 2011 by Chef Cheryl La Tigre

HAWAIIAN AND POLYNESIAN RECIPES, PT. XV

Hawaiian and Polynesian Recipes, Part XV: Baked Opakapaka with Pineapple Hollandaise—Hawaiian and French Cuisines intermingled to create a Taste of Heaven



Bakersfield, CA, 12-24-2011 S: Happy Christmas Eve, my friends! Right now, Hawaii is a beautiful place to be as the Christmas season here is impossible to beat.  I realize that in many other places around the nation, to express holiday greetings or to put out Nativity Scenes is to risk vandalism, disdain, and destruction but here, no one messes with open expressions of love, joy, happiness, and merriment.  We love the holidays here and over the course of the New Year’s, we will see fireworks going off all over the place and for those of us unfortunate enough to have to work early on New Year’s Day, it sort of sucks but for those who can sleep in, it’s a matter of wax earplugs.  I do love the holidays here and wish that I could wish each and every one of you a very warm, island Christmas.  Aloha, my friends, aloha!

Today, we are going to prepare Opakapaka which is Hawaiian Pink Snapper, a tasty treat that everyone loves but is difficult to find outside the area.  You can substitute Red Snapper for it on the mainland which seems to be everywhere but here, well, we’re very fortunate to be able to enjoy all sorts of wonderful fish, most of them locally caught with the only exceptions being the types of fish our Filipino friends enjoy which are caught in waters closer to their home and then sold—frozen—here on Oahu.  Their fish are very bony whereas ours are smooth, sweet, and fleshy and without a great deal of bones.  We are going to accompany our fish today with a Pineapple Hollandaise Sauce which is a variation of standard hollandaise sauce but flavored as only the Hawaiian people can: with pineapple and sugar.  Fresh pineapple is good but it needs to be blanched and my preference is dried fruit but this recipe will utilize canned that’s been pressed of its liquid. Let’s do it:

BAKED OPAKAPAKA WITH PINEAPPLE HOLLANDAISE

Yield:  4 servings / Mis-en-place: 30-40 minutes with prep:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
The Opakapaka (Pink Snapper):
4
7-8-ounce
Opakapaka filets, rinsed

Seasoned flour

.25
Cup
Vegetable oil

Kosher salt and pepper

.25
Cup
Chablis

.5
Cup
Diced scallions

.25
Cup
Minced red bell peppers (seeded and stemmed); blanched
.25
Cup
Minced green bell peppers (seeded and stemmed); blanched
The Pineapple Hollandaise:
8
Each
Egg yolks

2
Tablespoons
Cold water

2
Teaspoons
Lemon juice

2-3
Cups
Warm drawn butter

1
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.5
Teaspoon
Cayenne pepper

1
Teaspoon
Straight sherry

2
Teaspoons
Torani’s pineapple syrup

1
Tablespoon
Crushed pineapple, pressed dry

Granulated sugar or Splenda, to taste

1
Teaspoon
Freshly minced parsley
Rinsed
The Finish:
4
Each
Ti leaves, squared

4
Each
Broiled pineapple wedges

1
Tablespoon
Freshly minced parsley
Rinsed
Edible flowers for garnish

1
Cup
Broken Glass Garnish
Accompanying



Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work! Preheat your standard oven to 375°F or your convection oven—fan “on”—to 325°F.  Blanch the garnish vegetables.  Cut a small pineapple into 6-8 wedges after trimming the leaves emanating from the top—don’t cut them all the way off, but “block” them so that they’re more attractive.  Rub them with salad oil and set aside until it’s time to broil them.  Be sure to have your broiler or your barbeque pit turned on or if you have an overhead oven broiler, do this before you bake the opakapaka.

a.      Broil the pineapple wedges on both sides, you want to somewhat cook the fruit as much as you want to get crisscross charcoal lines on it; when you have, set them aside and keep them warm.

2.      Make the Pineapple Hollandaise Sauce by doing the following: have a saucepot on the stove with simmering water in it ready.  Using a stainless steel bowl, scramble the egg yolks with the cold water and once you have, hold the bowl in one hand above the hot water while whisking constantly with the other.  Hold the bowl so that it’s just above the water but not touching it.  Continue whisking without letting up.

3.      At first, the mixture will look like liquid as you whisk it but then you’ll notice that it’s expanding and getting a little bit foamy.  Keep watch on the bottom of the bowl, NOW!

4.      As you continue whisking the mixture, you will see that it’s beginning to solidify and as soon as you see it showing signs of SCRAMBLING, pull it out of the pot immediately but all the while still continuing to whisk furiously in order to homogenize it and to prevent any damage being done to it.  Whisk in the lemon juice now.

5.      When it appears to be smooth, place the metal bowl inside a China bowl with a towel laid across it to keep the stainless steel bowl from slipping.  Now with one hand whisking constantly, begin dribbling the drawn butter in along the sides of the bowl using a ladle.  Every time that it shows there’s too much liquid in the bowl and the egg yolks can’t handle it, STOP THE PROCESS AND WAIT UNTIL THEY CAN! And if the yolks seem like they’ve had enough butter, stop and don’t force them to take any more!

6.      When you have accomplished a light, velvety sauce, blend in the remaining ingredients and check the final flavor: it should be a tangy-sweet, pineapple-tasting hollandaise sauce and if it needs a little sweetener, add it to taste, whisking it in gently along with the parsley flakes.  If your sauce begins to thicken on you during the holding time, simply whisk in a little bit of warm water.

7.      Note: the big problem with hollandaise sauces is the holding temperature: normally, anything within the Danger Zone; that is, between 45°F on the low end and 140°F on the high end is at optimum risk for the development of harmful bacteria that can lead to foodborne illness and what’s more, eggs are high in protein and protein is one of the prime things favored by these bacteria.  You cannot hold the members of the Hollandaise Family of Sauces above 140-145°F without risk of them breaking so the only thing you can do is to hold them as close as you can to your primary heat source (i.e., steam table) so as to keep the emulsion from breaking.  The thing you need to do is to use them within 30-60 minutes and then discard them and start fresh.  This is what professional chefs have to do several times during their shift.

8.      The Opakapaka: dust the fish with seasoned flour and then shake off the excess; set aside.  Heat the vegetable oil in a large heavy-duty skillet over medium heat and when it’s hot, add the fish and brown lightly on one side.  Season to taste with the Kosher Salt and Pepper seasoning and then turn the fish over.  Begin on their back side, turn over to their front side, and then turn over to the back side.  Add the garnish vegetables and the Chablis and deglaze the pan.

9.      Place the skillet in the oven or if you cannot do this, transfer the fish filets to a sheet pan sprayed with PAM or some such other food release spray and then place on the middle rack of your preheated oven and bake 4-5 minutes or until the fish tests done.  Check it for firmness and also its color: it should be a solid white and not opaque like raw fish.  Also, if there are any remaining bones, they’ll be protruding from the surface.  Remove the fish then at this point.

10.  Serve the Baked Opakapaka on each of four plates in the following manner: place a square of ti leaf atop each plate and then place an opakapaka filet atop it.  Do this at the six o’clock position and behind each portion, place a broiled pineapple wedge. At the ten o’clock position, place a mound of rice pilaf and at the two o’clock position; place a spoonful of sautéed vegetables like carrots, broccoli, and cauliflower.  Ladle the pineapple hollandaise sauce over each fish filet and then sprinkle freshly minced parsley across the plates.  Place an edible flower* atop each fish portion and finally, sprinkle the Broken Glass Garnish around the rims of each plate.  Be sure to always use LARGE serving plates or platters when presenting a fish such as this.  The presentation is extremely important.   Anyhow, once you’ve set up the plates according to your liking, present them to the guests and watch the reactions: they’ll be stunned.

Hawaiian pink snapper or opakapaka is one of the joys of living in the Hawaiian Islands.  There are so many different fish available there that are seldom seen on the Mainland so if you can find it in a fresh fish store or at a fishmonger’s, buy it.  Remember: fresh is always preferable but if you find it frozen and you live in the Midwest, buy it.  Red snapper can generally be substituted for the various snappers in recipes such as this.  Whatever you do, remember this maxim: Never overcook your fish, if anything, serve it just a touch under on a HOT plate.  The hot plate will do the cooking. 

*Use nasturtiums, pansies, or rose petals that you’ve cleaned.

SEASONED FLOUR


1. About 2.5 cups:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2.5
Cups
All-purpose flour

1
Tablespoon
Cayenne pepper

1
Tablespoon
White pepper

1.5
Tablespoon
Hungarian paprika

1.5
Teaspoons
Granulated garlic

1
Tablespoon
Kosher salt

2
Teaspoons
Parsley flakes




Method:

1.      Combine all ingredients together and store in an airtight jar, baggie, or whatever else and either keep at room temperature or in your freezer until needed.

It’s important to have a seasoned flour recipe for breading different foods and this is a good one.  You will use this recipe many times.

Here’s the Kosher Salt and Pepper Seasoning, it’s an important one that Stinkbug promotes as it’s his personal blend:

KOSHER SALT AND PEPPER SEASONING

1. Yield: One cup of seasoning:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
Cup
Kosher salt

1.5
Tablespoon
Coarse black pepper

.5
Teaspoon
Hungarian paprika

.5
Teaspoon
Dry parsley flakes




Method:

1.      Combine together and store in an airtight container.

This is a good basic, salt-and-pepper seasoning that you will find many uses for.

BROKEN GLASS GARNISH





Yield: about 1 cup / Mis-en-place: about 20 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
.25
Cup
3/16” square-cut carrots
Rinsed
.25
Cup
3/16” square-cut red cabbage
Rinsed
.25
Cup
3/16” square celery
Rinsed
.25
Cup
3/16” square cut red bell pepper
Rinsed



Method:

1.      Rinse cabbage well, and then toss all ingreds together. Let them dry a little bit at room temp then keep on the cold line. I will tell you when to utilize this garnish which is a very attractive one; it reminds me of the stars in the heavens.

This is a very important garnish that you will use on all sorts of things so keep it available at all times.

As Stinkbug tells us to tell you all each and every day and all of my companions before me; I have had a great time today and as always enjoy my opportunities to write for the Elemental News of the Day. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

Well, have a wonderful Christmas Eve and tomorrow, we’ll spend Christmas together!  I’m looking forward to being here on the holiday and then taking time off and I do hope that each and every one of you has a nice holiday planned and that you will be using recipes and knowledge you’ve gained from being a member of the Elemental News of the Day.  Also, we’re on the countdown now to the end of the Mayan Calendar, some people believe things will happen and others don’t.  I think I’m among the second group whereas Stinkbug is definitely among the first.  I guess we’ll see!  Oh, well, if it is the end of the world, then I guess we should enjoy it should we not so let’s eat, drink, and be merry! Merry Christmas!  Anyhow—all we ask of you, dear readers, is that you please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by the Grateful Dead and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com.  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!    

Thanks, my friends!

Cheryl La Tigre

Cheryl La Tigre
CEC, ACF, Chefs de Cuisine Association of Honolulu, Hawaii


This is me back in the 1980’s when I was working at a hotel in Honolulu, HI, on Waikiki Beach.  I began my career in the early 1970’s when I apprenticed to cook under one of the masters on the Big Island where I was born.  I moved to Oahu in the early 1980’s after having worked in both Kona and Hilo, HI, and have been there for most of my professional career.  I have also worked on Maui for a few years (1995-1998) and have also been on Kauai (2001-2003) before returning to Honolulu.  My goal is to prepare the next generation of chefs for the future and also to help the underprivileged in their struggle to attain careers in the foodservice industry.

---30---

END Commentary for Saturday, December 24, 2011 by Chef Cheryl La Tigre.



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chef Cheryl La Tigre



Recipes created by Chef Cheryl La Tigre on August 26, 1989 in Honolulu, HI.

KEEP READING THE ELEMENTARY NEWS OF THE DAY FOR THE BEST OF CULINARY POLITICS!

http://elementalnewsoftheday.blogspot.com/

“Stinky” of the Elemental News of the Day for the best of the news, politics, sports, foodservice, hotel and restaurant business, the end times, the end of days, the apocalypse, armageddon, and whatever else happens to pop up!

 




                                                                                    

END OF THE YEAR STINKBUG


                                                                              
                                                                                                                                                          
This is #1219 an 11” x 14" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Autumn Creek." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures V
                                                                           




























                                                                                      


                                                                                  
Magnolia Hilltop Brewers and What's Cookin' Productions Trademark of Quality and Symbol of Integrity. Copyright 12-22-2011, all rights reserved. No unauthorized reproductions of any of this material are permissible unless granted by written permission. Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.

Publisher: B. Carrick

Chief Editor: Stinkbug.

Assistant Editor: Moses Scharbug III

Proofreader: Amos Mosby Caruthers.

Beer: Smokehouse.






























                                                                                       
MAGNOLIA HILLTOP BREWERS PRODUCTIONS

Tags:

Cheryl La Tigre, Hawaiian and Polynesian Recipes, The Grateful Dead, Oriental Cuisine, Oriental Cookery, Oriental Foods, Snapper, Hawaiian Foods, Gourmet Cookery, Asian Foods, Seafood,










                                                                                 
Trademark of Quality c/o the Elemental News of the Day and Magnolia Hilltop Brewers Productions 2011 of Bakersfield, California, the United States of America.











Advertisements:




















































No comments:

Post a Comment

Please leave comments! Thanks! The American Institute of Culinary Politics-Elemental News of the Day!