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Monday, November 7, 2011

“Special Menus, Pt. XVI: Thanksgiving Dinner, Pt. II—Turkey Stock, Turkey Gravy, and Seasoning Mixes”

The Grateful Dead’s seventieth album, “Dick’s Picks Vol. XXIV—the Cow Palace, Daly City, CA, 03-23-1974” was released on February 10, 2002 and was another great offering in the Dick’s Picks’ series.  Like its predecessors in the Dick’s Picks series, this is an excellent addition and definitely one that everyone should own.  We therefore recommend that you buy it and think you will be delighted with it so please take the handy link to Amazon.com, the world’s largest online retailer and get it now! You won’t be disappointed!  Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.





                                                                                

Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 410 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!




                                                                                        



                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                                 



Chef Santanamos “El Chilote” De Soto

END Commentary 11-08-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 1,904.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Tuesday, November 08, 2011 by Chef El Chilote

SPECIAL MENUS, PT. XVI

 Special Menus, Pt. XVI: Thanksgiving Dinner, Pt. II—Turkey Stock, Turkey Gravy, and Seasoning Mixes


Bakersfield, CA, 11-08-2011 T: We had a great time yesterday making our turkey and today, we’re going to continue on with the Gravy part of the equation, how to make turkey stock, how to make roux, how to make the flavorings that we use in work as prep cooks.  Basically, that is who does the turkeys in professional foodservice: the prep cooks, the Prepmaster, and sometimes the Chef and the Saucier.  Very seldom does the Executive Chef have a hand in making the Thanksgiving meal unless he or she makes a special dessert.  It’s usually the Executive Sous Chef or the Prepmaster who is called upon to gather up the pot-and-pan-washers, the dishwashers, and the yard guys and directs them on what and how to do it.  It’s a tiresome process, hundreds of turkeys lining every shelf inside the meat walk-in or locker defrosting, turkey blood pooling upon the floor which causes the yard man to come in with the mop and bucket and swab the floor constantly.  The sinks may be packed with defrosting turkeys and the cutting table is full of raw birds being trussed for the big event.  Some turkeys are cooked in advance for the plate-up from the kitchen while those being carved at tableside are prepared the day of the event.  Again, we will present our menu to you which over the course of the next week, we are going to develop—our Special Menu—so that you can do what we do for your family at Thanksgiving.  Here’s our menu (again):

THANKSGIVING DINNER 2011

I.                    El Chilote’s Favorite Roasted Turkey

II.                 Parsnip and Apple Stuffing

III.            Turkey Gravy

IV.              Mashed Sweet Potatoes

V.                Whipped Red Potatoes

VI.              Candied Parsnips

VII.           Butter Peas with Apples and Ham

VIII.         Fresh Cranberry Sauce

IX.              Blue Cornmeal Muffins

X.                Auntie Helen’s Pumpkin Pie with Fresh Whipped Cream

XI.              Old-Fashioned Mincemeat Pie with Brandy Sauce

XII.           Waldorf Salad

XIII.         Tossed Green Salad with Relishes

XIV.        Additional Sauces, Accompaniments, and Sides

Today, we will do the Turkey Gravy and Turkey Stock so let’s get going:

(#211) TURKEY STOCK

Yield:  3 gallons / Mis-en-place: :


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2
Each
Turkey carcasses

4
Gallons
Water

.25
Bunch
Celery, chopped

1.25
Pieces
Yellow onions, chopped

10
Tablespoons
Carrots, chopped

1.5
Teaspoon s
Whole rosemary

1.25
Pieces
Bay leaves

1.5
Teaspoons
Thyme

2
Tablespoons
Garlic cloves

.25
#
Turkey base (top quality)

1
Tablespoon
Black peppercorns




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: Cover carcasses with cold water and allow sitting for 30 minutes; then, draining off and covering with fresh. Add the rest of the ingredients except for the peppercorns and bring to a boil and keep there for 2 minutes; then, lower flame to barest minimum and allow to (preferably) sitting overnight on your stove. Add the peppercorns now.



2.      The next day, return to a high simmer and keep there for 5 minutes; then, strain the broth through a double-chinois filtered with a towel into bucket(s) then through the chinois lined with cheese cloth. If not using to prepare turkey gravy right away, place the buckets in your sink and surround with ice to quickly bring the temperature down. Then, refrigerate.

This is a good way to make turkey stock. Here’s the seasoning packet:

(#209) STANDARD SACHET d’EPICES


Yield:  for ONE gallon / Mis-en-place: 5 minutes:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
3
Stems
Parsnips

4
Stems
Thyme

1
Each
Bay leaf

1
Teaspoon
White pepper corns

1
Clove
Garlic




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: Combine the above in cheese cloth and secure with a piece of string. Any variety of herbs can be included in the sachet depending on what you want the outcome of the stock to be like.

This is an excellent and traditional way of adding spices and herbs to a sauce. Okay, here’s the Turkey Gravy formula:

TURKEY GRAVY

Yield:  6-8 cups / Mis-en-place: 1.5 to 2 hours:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1.5
Cups
Turkey drippings

3
Tablespoons
Madeira sherry

1.25
Cups
All-purpose flour

10
Cups
Turkey stock

2.5
Teaspoons
Kosher salt

.75
Teaspoon
White pepper

1
Teaspoon
Whole thyme

.5
Teaspoon
Poultry seasoning

2
Teaspoons
Freshly minced parsley
Rinsed



Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: prepare the turkey stock by placing the necks, gizzards, giblets, heart, and vegetable scraps such as parsley stems, carrot peels and ends, celery leaves, yellow onion peels, and parsnip peelings into a large pot and boiling them.  Add about 2 gallons of water and place on the stove OR use the recipe for making turkey stock.

2.      Place the roasting pan that had the turkey in it and turn up the heat to a medium-flame.  Add the Madeira sherry and deglaze the pan.  With a whisk or a spoon, scrape all of the caramelized drippings off the bottom of the pan. 

3.      Measure the drippings—return one cup to the roasting pan and discard the rest.  Add the flour and whisk together well.  Cook to form a roux while in the meantime, bring the stock on the stove to a boil.  Pour it into the roux—whisking constantly—until a smooth pan sauce has formed.  Simmer the sauce for several minutes and should it appear too thin, make a roux out of any reserved drippings and additional all-purpose flour OR make cornstarch slurry and whisk it in, thickening it up.

4.      Chop the gizzards, giblets, heart, and the neck and return to the gravy.  Discard the liver or mix it into the dressing.  Add the seasonings to the gravy by removing a small portion of it, placing it in the bowl of an electric mixer equipped with a whip attachment, and adding the spices to it.  Whip at medium-high speed and then scoop this mixture into the gravy.  Whisk fiercely to combine it and to distribute the spices and then lower the heat to a low simmer and allow it to perk for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally, for the flavor to develop.  Then, it’s ready to serve.

This is classic turkey gravy that is based upon the drippings.  The drippings is where virtually ALL of the flavor is located, left there as the meat slowly roasts and caramel deposits form on the pan which provide both color and flavor.  The best gravy is one in which the color is totally natural and so is the flavor, augmented by very few spices and herbs.

Mirepoix mixes are used to flavor cooking meats like the turkey or to add flavor to stocks and sauces.  This is the Simple Mirepoix:

(#206) SIMPLE MIREPOIX

Yield:  1# / Mis-en-place: 5 minutes:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
8
Ounces
Onions, peeled

4
Ounces
Carrots, peeled

4
Ounces
Celery, trimmed




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: Simple mirepoix is something that can be used as a soup base or larger depending upon the dish you’re making. A larger cut would be for the making of stews with only potatoes and possi­bly tomatoes added.

This is a standard preparation that every chef must know. Here’s the White Mirepoix:

(#207) WHITE MIREPOIX


Yield:  1.25# / Mis-en-place: 5 minutes:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
4
Ounces
Onions, peeled

4
Ounces
Leeks, white part only

4
Ounces
Parsnips, peeled

4
Ounces
Celery, trimmed

4
Ounces
Mushroom trimmings




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: Have all vegetables washed and peeled; cut to size depending upon dish you are making and the length of time it needs to be cooked.

This is used for sauces and stocks that you want to keep light in color and not darken.  It’s important to know, too. Finally, here’s the Standard Bouquet Garni which is generally added to roasting meats to add the flavor of vegetables.

(#208) STANDARD BOUQUET GARNI

Yield:  for one gallon  / Mis-en-place: 5 minutes:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
Stalk
Celery

3
Each
Carrots

1
Each
Onion

2
Each
Leeks

1
Piece
Bay leaf

1
Sprig
Fresh thyme

.5
Piece
parsnips




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: Wash and clean all vegetables. Halve the vegetables and combine with the herbs in a large piece of cheese cloth. Then, tie it all up and this is what you’ll use when you make your stocks. It’s easy to put it in and easy to take it out. This is the basic of basics.

     Note: parsnips are not always included so you have to always consider the final flavor you’re after. Some stocks do not benefit from their flavor so always keep that in mind. Some bouquet garnis do not utilize carrots either but I always have. Something else that adds as well is garlic cloves and whole white pepper corns.



This is the classic addition to braising meats, poultry, and even seafood.  It’s an important item to have in one’s repertoire.

As I told all of you yesterday, I have had a great time today and as always enjoy my opportunities to write for the Elemental News of the Day. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

Yesterday was a fun day, we made a turkey which is always phenomenally difficult to do when one is writing about it, especially the trussing part.  Still, we managed to do it and I think we did it very well, amigos.  That is what being a family is all about—even an online family.  We are going to hit ONE year here at Google come Thanksgiving 2011 and that’s going to be good as this has been a long, hard slog putting together a new blog out of the ashes of the Choseit.com blog that was closed by them.  We love what we do and do what we love and that is the difference between us and all the rest of the culinary websites: we LIVE it while they just bullshit about it.  That’s sort of sad when you consider that our readership is very low compared to the rest; we have over FIVE centuries of professional foodservice experience all in one convenient place.  Tell your friends, family, neighbors, coworkers, and even the service folks who come to your house to fix the cable.  Tell them to read the Elemental News of the Day!  Anyhow, please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by the Grateful Dead and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com.  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!    

Muchas gracias, buen amigos!

El Chilote

Santanamos “El Chilote” De Soto

CWC, ACF, Maui Chefs’ Society

__________________________________________________________________

This is a shot of me taken when I was a young cook back in the early 1960's. I served underneath a Master Chef for many years before striking out on my own. I went up the coast of the Western United States and Canada, working all the way until I made it to Alaska. Then, I returned to Washington State and it was there that I met Stinkbug.

---30---

END Commentary for Tuesday, November 08, 2011 by Chef El Chilote



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chef El Chilote



Recipes created by Chef El Chilote on November 20, 1975 in Mukilteo, WA.

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This is #1247 a 5” x 7" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Ballerina." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

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