Popular Posts

Thursday, October 13, 2011

“Famous Restaurant Recipes, Pt. XXXI: Grilled Halibut Fletch with Beefsteak Tomatoes and Basil-Balsamic Vinaigrette—a Dish too Good to be True!”

The Grateful Dead’s forty-sixth album, “Fall-out from the Phil Zone” was released in July 1997 and was a wonderful live compilation put out by bassist Phil Lesh that featured many hard-to-find cuts from the Dead’s history.  Pigpen features prominently in many of the tracks on this CD and that in and of itself makes a worthwhile purchase.  Please take the handy link to Amazon.com, the world’s largest online retailer and get it now! You won’t be disappointed!  Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.



                                                                                
Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 435 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!




                                                                                         


                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                                   



Chef Pedro Munoz

END Commentary 10-14-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 1,946.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Friday, October 14, 2011 by Chef Pedro R. Munoz
FAMOUS RESTAURANT RECIPES, PT. XXXI

 Famous Restaurant Recipes, Pt. XXXI: Grilled Halibut Fletch with Beefsteak Tomatoes and Basil-Balsamic Vinaigrette—a Dish too Good to be True!



Bakersfield, CA, 10-14-2011 F: Friday is traditionally a day when we eat fish so that’s what we’re going to do today, friends, eat fish—well, actually, we’re going to cook fish, you’re going to eat it!  I love working with fresh halibut, something that is very difficult to find south of the Pacific Northwest unless in frozen form.  If you’ve never tasted fresh before, you have absolutely no idea so dining upon it was fine because you didn’t know any different but once you have had fresh halibut, it’s almost impossible to eat the frozen stuff ever again unless you cut it up, dip it in batter, and throw it into the French fryer.  But even that—once you’ve had fresh halibut fish and chips, you can’t eat any of the crap the fools at Long John’s Silver Fish House is serving, those so-called “fish specialists.” Those idiots have no idea what handling or cooking fresh fish is all about and like the dumb-ass “Grill Masters” at the Red Lobster franchises, there is no one save a professional chef who’s experienced in handling fresh fish who can prepare seafood properly.

Okay, so I seem a bit prejudiced, I understand how you feel but you know?  I’m tired of all of this chain restaurant, fast-food crap that the big corporations are stuffing down our throats.  That is what they do: blitz us with television advertising and make us believe—like the Olive Garden propaganda—that these people are specialists and know their stuff.  I really wish that more and more young people would enter the American Culinary Federation’s Apprenticeship Program and become professional chefs or go to the Culinary Institute of America and sign up and pay the money to become a trained chef.  A career in foodservice is a wonderful thing but it’s not going to happen if you come up at McDonald’s unless, of course, you want to be a fast-food manager.  If that’s what you want—that’s fine, but I say: aspire to be more!

We are going to make a fabulous halibut dish today: Grilled Halibut Fletch with Beefsteak Tomatoes and Sweet Basil Balsamic Vinaigrette.  This is a tasty dish, both sweet and spicy due to the sweetness of the fish and the tanginess of the dressing.  The beefsteak tomatoes are a wonderful accompaniment and if bought ripe and prepared properly will blow everyone away.  Trust me, I know my stuff.  Let’s do it:

GRILLED HALIBUT WITH BEEFSTEAK TOMATOES & BASIL-BALSAMIC VINAIGRETTE



To serve four / Mis-en-place: about 15 minutes:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
4
7-ounce
Halibut fletches

12
0.5”
Center-cut beefsteak tomato slices

4
Ounces
Fish baste

4
Teaspoons
Kosher salt and pepper

6
Ounces
Basil-balsamic vinaigrette

4
Each
Basil flowers




Method:

1.      Grill halibut until second mark is made; then, fire tomatoes on the grill using fish baste on BOTH products.

2.      Sprinkle kosher salt-pepper on tomatoes and score each with a sharp knife.

3.      Baste tomatoes and fish with vinaigrette then place tomatoes on inner edge of a serving plate and place fish halfway over the tomato slices. 

4.      Garnish with a basil flower.  Serve each with rice and fresh vegetables.

This is both an excellent and a quick way to prepare fresh halibut.  Always take care to keep halibut MOIST as it tends to dry out rather fast.  Use the fish baste liberally throughout the process.

 FISH BASTING OIL



1. About 1.5 cups:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2.25
Ounces
Clarified butter

2.25
Ounces
Clarified margarine

1
Teaspoon
Garlic salt

1-1/3
Tablespoons
Dry vermouth

1
Tablespoon
Lemon juice

1
Teaspoon
Worcestershire sauce

1
Teaspoon
Lawrey’s seasoned salt

.5
Teaspoon
Lemon pepper

2
Teaspoons
Granulated sugar

.75
Teaspoon
Hungarian paprika

1/3
Teaspoon
Steak salt

1
Teaspoon
Freshly minced parsley

.5
Teaspoon
Lemon zest




Method:

1.      Melt butter and margarine in a saucepan but do NOT stir!  When melted, draw clear liquid off the top of the pot; discard the settled mixture at the bottom. This process removes any solids and whey which will burn at low temperatures.  The end product is a clear oil that may be heated to high temperatures without burning. 

2.      Add remaining ingredients to clarified butter and margarine; mix thoroughly to dissolve and combine ingredients.  Place bowl in an ice bath and stir until mixture has emulsified.

3.      Place in a pan and hold at room temperature when using; otherwise, refrigerate until needed.

This is a handy item to have when broiling fish as it both lubricates and keeps it from burning.  It also provides flavor and makes your product appear appealing and delicious.  You will find many uses for this item.

KOSHER SALT AND PEPPER SEASONING



1. Yield: One cup of seasoning:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
Cup
Kosher salt

1.5
Tablespoon
Coarse black pepper

.5
Teaspoon
Hungarian paprika

.5
Teaspoon
Dry parsley flakes




Method:

1.      Combine together and store in an airtight container.

This is a good basic, salt-and-pepper seasoning that you will find many uses for. Here’s the dressing:

(#446) BASIL-BALSAMIC VINEGAR DRESSING





Yield:  about 1 quart / Mis-en-place: about 20 minutes:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2
Cups
Whole grain mustard

.25
Cup
 Balsamic vinegar

2
Tablespoons
Lemon juice

.75
Quart
Olive oil

1.5
Tablespoons
Fresh whole sweet basil, minced

2
Teaspoons
Kosher salt

.5
Teaspoon
Black pepper

.5
Teaspoon
Minced garlic

.5
Teaspoon
Dry parsley flakes




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready with which to work.

2.      Whip the first three ingredients together in the bowl of an electric mixer using the whip attachment and when light; begin dribbling in the olive oil along the sides of the bowl until combined.  As you perform this procedure, continue rotating the whip on medium speed until the oil is incorporated.

3.      Add the remaining ingredients, blending well.  Transfer to a sanitized container and refrigerate.  This dressing will last for about 1.5 weeks.   

This is a great dressing to have on hand as balsamic vinegar has become one of the all-time favorite condiments and additions to many foods and recipes.  You will find many uses for it so keep it handy!

As I told you all yesterday, I have had a great time today and as always enjoy my opportunities to write for the Elemental News of the Day. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun! Expect that when all of us have run through our cycle, we will be introducing some brand-new talent or so I’m told.

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

I love Fridays as that means it’s time for the weekend, and that means it’s time to break out the wine and socialize with my friends, family, and neighbors.  We have a wonderful neighborhood here in Bakersfield out in Seven Oaks which is affordable compared to my beloved San Diego.  The southland is a high-priced, difficult area in which to live as prices are sky-high and the mileage long to go anywhere.  The trip between Los Angeles and San Diego seems like forever and the one time I drove down from the Oregon border to the Mexican border seemed like it was a year-long or more.  That’s the problem with this state: it’s too damned big and that is one of the reasons many people have been driven out to neighboring areas.  I keep thinking that it would be wonderful to move to Idaho or Utah and get lost, far from civilization and government.  If I could only go home to Mexico, I would be gone in a minute but it’s no longer safe to visit.  Anyhow, please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by the Grateful Dead and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com.  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!    

Thank you!

Pedro Munoz

Executive Chef Pedro Munoz
CEC, American Culinary Federation, Inc.


This is me at an awards dinner in San Diego for the Chefs de Cuisine in 1978. I began my culinary career in the 1950's and had the good fortune of working with many different chefs before meeting my good friend, Stinkbug, in the mid-1980's in Bakersfield.

---30---

END Commentary for Friday, October 14, 2011 by Chef Pedro R. Munoz



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chef Pedro R. Munoz

Recipes created by Chef Pedro R. Munoz on April 15, 1984 in San Diego, CA.

KEEP READING THE ELEMENTARY NEWS OF THE DAY FOR THE BEST OF CULINARY POLITICS!

http://elementalnewsoftheday.blogspot.com/

“Stinky” of the Elemental News of the Day for the best of the news, politics, sports, foodservice, hotel and restaurant business, the end times, the end of days, the apocalypse, armageddon, and whatever else happens to pop up!

 




                                                                                      
          EDWARDS, CA, STINKY



                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
This is #1007, a 16” x 12" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Circus Parade." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures IV
                                                                            




























                                                                                    

                                                                      
Magnolia Hilltop Brewers and What's Cookin' Productions Trademark of Quality and Symbol of Integrity. Copyright 10-12-2011, all rights reserved. No unauthorized reproductions of any of this material are permissible unless granted by written permission. Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.

Chief Editor: Stinkbug.

Assistant Editor: Moses Scharbug III

Proofreader: Amos Mosby Caruthers.

Beer: Smokehouse.






























                                                                                        
MAGNOLIA HILLTOP BREWERS PRODUCTIONS

Tags:

Pedro Munoz, Modern Cuisine, Gourmet Recipes, Famous Restaurant Recipes, Fish, Gourmet Foods, Fine-Dining, The Grateful Dead, Beefsteak Tomatoes, Halibut, Baked Dishes, Northwest Cuisine,












                                                                             
Trademark of Quality c/o the Elemental News of the Day and Magnolia Hilltop Brewers Productions 2011 of Bakersfield, California, the United States of America.











Advertisements:


























































No comments:

Post a Comment

Please leave comments! Thanks! The American Institute of Culinary Politics-Elemental News of the Day!