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Monday, September 12, 2011

“Coffee Shop Favorites, Pt. VII: Breaded Veal Cutlet with Chicken Gravy—once a Coffee Shop Deception, now—the Real Thing!”

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                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                                  


Chef Olaf Bologolo

END Commentary 09-13-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 1,792.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Tuesday, September 13, 2011 by Chef Olaf Bologolo

COFFEE SHOP FAVORITES, PT. VII

 Coffee Shop Favorites, Pt. VII: Breaded Veal Cutlet with Chicken Gravy—once a Coffee Shop Deception, now—the Real Thing!


Bakersfield, CA, 09-13-2011 T:  Greetings, once again, friends! Today, we will be doing the flipside of yesterday’s Chicken Fried Steak, the Breaded Veal Cutlet with Chicken Gravy.  In the old days, it was the accepted practice of the times to use the same piece of meat used in the chicken fry for the veal cutlet and you know what? Only one in one hundred diners ever complained which to me, is an amazing fact.  But that is how it was in the early 1970’s and back, beef was used as veal and very few Americans ever said anything about it.  Then, at some point in the 1970’s, truth in advertising laws came into being and suddenly, the old practices went bye-bye!  Not only did we have the health inspectors to contend with, we now had to contend with the menu police who came into our restaurants and asked us if the Prime Rib we were serving was really “USDA Prime” or was it a lesser cut?  Well, everyone was serving USDA Choice Rib and suddenly, we could no longer call “Choice” “Prime.” It became Choice Rib at every restaurant.  Seems silly now as things have gone back to the old ways concerning the rib quality but one can no longer call beef “veal.”  That’s a good thing, to be sure, because there is a great difference between veal and beef.  Veal is the tender, young animal, milk-fed albeit separated from its mother.  It is generally slaughtered at 4-6 weeks of age and is extremely tender but tasteless.  Europeans are big on eating veal whereas Americans have never been and are less so due to the fact that animal rights groups have made sure that everyone knows what happens to the young calves and the pain and misery they experience prior to their deaths.  Personally, I concur with the ideas of those who wish to demote veal from our menus.  All we’re doing today is to share the OLD recipes:

The “Breaded Veal Cutlet” of old was always breaded in a mixture of flour and cracker meal in order to distinguish it from the chicken fried steaks and to further promote this difference; it was served with chicken gravy.  Today, you will get the recipes for the cutlet and the gravy PLUS we will run the White Country Gravy and Red-eye Gravy one more time for your convenience.  If you’re ready, let us do it to it!  



SEASONED FLOUR


5.      About 2.5 cups:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2.5
Cups
All-purpose flour

1
Tablespoon
Cayenne pepper

1
Tablespoon
White pepper

1.5
Tablespoon
Hungarian paprika

1.5
Teaspoons
Granulated garlic

1
Tablespoon
Kosher salt

2
Teaspoons
Parsley flakes



Method:

1.      Combine all ingredients together and store in an airtight jar, baggie, or whatever else and either keep at room temperature or in your freezer until needed.

It’s important to have a seasoned flour recipe for breading different foods and this is a good one.  You will use this recipe many times.

BREADED VEAL CUTLET


Yield: four servings / Mis-en-place: about 30 minutes:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other


4
5-6-ounce
Veal cutlets, tenderized



Seasoned flour



.5
Cup
Whole milk



3
Each
Large AAA eggs



.75
Teaspoon
Lawrey’s seasoned salt



.5
Teaspoon
Lawrey’s seasoned pepper



.5
Teaspoon
Granulated garlic



Seasoned flour



Cracker meal



2
Teaspoons
Minced parsley
Rinsed


2-4
Cups
Chicken gravy



2
Teaspoons
Minced parsley
Rinsed


Spanish paprika



Method:

1.      Dredge the veal cutlets in the seasoned flour and place in the fridge.  In a bowl, beat the milk and the eggs together, beating well, and then force through a fine-meshed sieve into another bowl.  Add the seasonings and blend well.

2.      Dip the cutlets into the egg-mixture and allow the excess to run off and then transfer each back into the flour mixture and turn over.  Press into a combination of equal parts of seasoned flour and cracker meal to which the first measure of parsley flakes has been added and turn over and press again.  Shake off any excess and place in the refrigerator for several minutes while you heat some oil in a heavy-bottom skillet or on a flat-top griddle.

3.      When the oil’s hot, place the cutlets within it and cook.  Cook on both sides, until each side is a golden-brown and then transfer to plates with a bed of chicken gravy underneath each one. Accompany with mashed potatoes and buttered green peas and sprinkle freshly minced parsley and paprika over all. Serve and enjoy!

Back in the old days, before “truth in advertising” laws became nationwide, coffee shops would use the same pieces of meat—beef trim—that they used for their chicken fried steaks.  This obviously was not the “right” thing to do but that is how it was.  The funny thing is, very people complained so it must have been an acceptable ruse back in the early 1970’s and farther back.  Nowadays, we use real veal in place of beef cube steaks. Here’s the Chicken Gravy:

CHICKEN GRAVY


Yield: about ONE quart / Mis-en-place: about 30 minutes:



Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
.5
Cup
Vegetable oil

.5
Cup
All-purpose flour

.5
Teaspoon
White pepper

.5
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.25
Teaspoon
Whole thyme

3
Cups
Chicken stock
Hot

Method:

1.      In a heavy-duty saucepot sprayed with PAM or some such other food release spray, combine the oil and flour over a medium-flame to form a roux. Cook for several minutes, stirring almost constantly.  Add the seasonings.

2.      Next, pour in the chicken stock gradually whisking all the while until incorporated.  Raise the temperature and continue stirring as it comes to a bubble and forms into a medium-consistency sauce. Then, lower heat and keep warm.

This is basic chicken gravy, one for use in simple dishes such as coffee shop veal cutlets and such.  It’s always good to have a few simple sauces that can be whipped up and kept on hand for use in special dishes or quick recipes.  You’ll find many uses for this so keep it handy! Here’s the White Country Gravy:

WHITE COUNTRY GRAVY


Yield: about ONE quart / Mis-en-place: about 30 minutes:



Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
3
Ounces
Sausage links, chopped

.25
Cup
Vegetable oil

.5
Cup
All-purpose flour

3
Cups
Whole milk
Hot
1
Tablespoon
Cracked black pepper

.75
Teaspoon
Kosher salt



Method:

1.      Place the chopped sausage in a heavy-duty saucepot that’s been sprayed with PAM or some such other food release spray. Set over medium-high heat and begin rendering the grease, stirring occasionally.  Add the vegetable oil.

2.      When it’s hot, add the flour and stir in to form a roux and cook for 4-5 minutes, stirring almost constantly.  Then, pour in the milk, whisking all the while, to form the sauce.  Allow it to bubble for a minute or two, stirring constantly, and then lower heat to a simmer, add the salt and pepper, and keep warm.

This is the classic white country gravy that’s served with biscuits and chicken fried steaks.  This is one you will always want to have on hand, especially if you’re a professional line cook working in a coffee shop.  If you’re a graveyard cook, it’s important to have a good biscuit and gravy recipe as that can either make or break you. Finally, here’s the Red-eye Gravy:

RED-EYE GRAVY


Yield: about 1.25 quarts / Mis-en-place: about 30 minutes:


Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
4
Strips
Thick bacon, chopped

1
Tablespoon
Hungarian paprika

.125
Cup
Vegetable oil

.5
Cup
All-purpose flour

5
Cups
Whole milk
Hot
1
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.25
Teaspoon
White pepper




Method:

1.      Place the chopped bacon and the paprika in a heavy-duty saucepot that’s been sprayed with PAM or some such other food release spray. Set over medium-high heat and begin rendering the grease, stirring occasionally.  Add the vegetable oil.

2.      When it’s hot, add the flour and stir in to form a roux and cook for 4-5 minutes, stirring almost constantly.  Then, pour in the milk, whisking all the while, to form the sauce.  Allow it to bubble for a minute or two, stirring constantly, and then lower heat to a simmer, add the salt and pepper, and keep warm.

Red-eye gravy is one of those that is somewhat Southern in style and flavoring and is not found everywhere outside the region.  We used to do it in California at a country club in order to do different things but up until then, I had never seen it. You can use this with your biscuits, chicken fried steaks, and even fried ham steaks.

As I mentioned yesterday, I have had a great time today and as always enjoy my opportunities to write for the Elemental News of the Day. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun!

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

Good golly, Ms. Molly! I have had a great time today sharing with you the old deceptions that took place in foodservice operations across the nation prior to the advent of “truth-in-advertising laws.”  In some ways, it’s a shame and in other ways, it’s progress which is always going to happen no matter what.  Many restaurateurs would dearly love for things to remain in stasis but that is never going to happen: you know that, I know that, we ALL know that.  It is important to keep up with the marches of time as to fall behind is to become retro.  Sure, it’s possible to become quite wealthy doing the retro thing but it doesn’t work for everyone!   Anyhow, please leave some comments and/or become a follower and why not spend some money and purchase an album by the Grateful Dead and/or buy a cookbook from Amazon.com.  We are allied with them and are pleased to market their merchandise! See you next time around! Bye!    

PEACE!

Olaf Bologolo

CEC, ACF, Washington State Chefs Association, Retired 


This is a photo of me taken at an ACF Convention back in the early 1960's when I was a representative from our California chapter. Anyhow, I'm a great deal older than this picture now but that's what we're doing, sharing OLD pictures of all of us. I'm still a handsome guy, however!

---30---

END Commentary for Tuesday, September 13, 2011 by Chef Olaf Bologolo



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chef Olaf Bologolo

Recipes created by Chef Olaf Bologolo on March 07, 1974 in Wasco, CA.

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This is #1017, a 30” x 40" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Yuccas at Evening." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

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Tags:

Olaf Bologolo, Coffee Shop Favorites, American Cuisine, Truckstop Cuisine, Good Food, Beef, American Classic Dishes, Gravy, Country Gravy, Tasty Foods, The Grateful Dead, Fried Foods, Veal, Chicken Gravy,  










                                                                                  
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