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Wednesday, August 24, 2011

“Fabulous Bakery Desserts, Pt. XXXII: White Chocolate Mousse—another Light and Fluffy Mousse for your dining Delight”

It’s a Beautiful Day was one of the Bay Area’s finest bands during the 1960’s-early 1970’s but due to contractual problems and the inflated ego of its leader, David LaFlamme, the band only made five albums and then went kaput.  The violin mastery of LaFlamme and the vocals of Patti Santos made them an overnight sensation with the first album, “It’s a Beautiful Day” which featured the iconic hit, “White Bird” and another classic, “Bombay Calling.”   We therefore urge you to take the handy link to Amazon.com, the world’s largest online retailer and buy it now! You won’t be disappointed! This is definitely a must-have album for all collectors of the psychedelic genre! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.




                                                                                   


Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 485 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!



                                                                                      



                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                              


Chef Murph MacDougal

END Commentary 08-25-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,004.



CULINARY POLITICS



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Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Thursday, August 25, 2011 by Chef Murph MacDougal

FABULOUS BAKERY DESSERTS, PT. XXXII

 Fabulous Bakery Desserts, Pt. XXXII: White Chocolate Mousse—another Light and Fluffy Mousse for your dining Delight



Bakersfield, CA, 08-25-2011 Th:  Greetings, friends, I am going to repeat what I told you all yesterday as that story pertains to the mousse I am teaching you today so please bear with me.  It’s important that you understand this story as it illustrates what we sometimes go through in the professional foodservice business when old-time chefs won’t share their knowledge with the younger cooks.  This is what I explained to you yesterday:

“Long ago, we had this great restaurant in our hometown that had some of the most closely-guarded dessert recipes that the owner only shared with her top chef and had him commit to memory or did them herself.  Margaret was known to be a bitch and was very protective of what she knew how to make but the word was she had purloined them herself from another great chef who later committed suicide when he lost his franchise desserts.  I was working at a country club as a sous chef and one summer when I was to take my vacation, I managed to get a job with her as the night pantry girl, telling her that I was disaffected with my job and that I would share the secrets of my employer with her.  The first week or so, everyone watched me closely so I went about doing my job and never said a peep but remembering what my father had told me, I followed his advice precisely: “steal everything you can—with your eyes!”

So, I watched Chef Hector make his desserts and two of them—today’s recipe and tomorrow’s—I ‘stole with my eyes.’ I managed to watch out of the corner of my eye how Chef Hector made this mousse—Chocolate-Amaretto Mousse and tomorrow’s White Chocolate Mousse—and committed them to memory.  Then, when Chef Hector had to go down to the storeroom, I quickly looked at his indecipherable handwritten notes, memorized them, and walked out of there six hours later and transcribed them at home on my word processor. It took a few times before I could do them perfectly but I was there for THREE WEEKS so by the time I left at the end of my stint, having given no notice, I knew them perfectly.  When I returned to my regular job at the end of the time, I introduced the desserts which received major raves and a lot of raised eyebrows as people recognized them but had no idea where I had gotten them.  Even my Chef didn’t know that I had been working over there until word came back through the purveyors’ careless speech that I had been over there.  This cost him the membership of Margaret and Chef Hector in our American Culinary Federation chapter when they realized what had happened and I could never go there to eat dinner with my first husband ever again.  There was even talk of a lawsuit of sorts but nothing ever happened as the country club had more powerful attorneys than had the restaurant.”

Well, there you go an interesting tale if ever there was one, my friends.  Just remember: as foodservice professionals, we have a God-given duty to teach the upcoming generations how to make the dishes we know so that they can elevate them to the next step!

Let’s make some mousse, shall we?  What you need to know is to always use clean, dry utensils when working with egg whites and heavy cream and be careful to NEVER overmix either of them in the first go-round as they will need to be combined together somewhere at the end of the process which means being mixed one last time. Use common sense and be careful and you will always have marvelous results.  You can also buy a book on custards, mousses, and puddings for additional information and enlightenment if you must at Amazon.com.  Let’s do it:

WHITE CHOCOLATE MOUSSE





Yield: 8 servings / Mis-en-place: about 2 hours:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
10
Ounces
White chocolate, melted

8
Each
Large egg yolks

1
Ounce
Gran Marnier liqueur

.25
Cup
Water

1
Quart
Heavy cream, whipped

2
Cups
Powdered sugar

2
Teaspoons
Vanilla extract

8
Each
Large egg whites, whipped

1
Cup
Granulated sugar

1
Teaspoon
Cream of tartar

1
Teaspoon
Orange syrup

2
Teaspoons
Orange zest

1
Cup
Whipped cream

.5
Cup
Powdered sugar

1
Teaspoon
Vanilla extract

2
Teaspoons
Gran Marnier liqueur

2-3
Ounces
White chocolate, grated

8
Each
Mint sprigs

8
Each
Maraschino cherries with stems




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready to work with. Melt chocolate in the top of a double-boiler; then, combine with the next THREE ingredients and cook like a custard, over but NOT on boiling water.  Let the steam do the job.

2.      In the meantime, whip the first measurement of heavy cream with the powdered sugar and vanilla in a chilled mixing bowl equipped with a whip attachment until fairly-stiff peaks have formed; transfer to a container and refrigerate.

3.      Next, using the same mixing bowl and whip attachment (wiped completely dry), beat the egg whites until semi-firm peaks begin to form. Then, gradually begin scaling in the granulated sugar, cream of tartar, orange syrup, and orange zest. 

4.      Return the whipped cream to the bowl and fold it in along with the chocolate mixture.  The key to making mousse is to NEVER overmix it when you’re at this point in the process or for any matter, at ANY point in the process because once it loses its body, it’s lost FOREVER.

5.      Chill the mousse for about an hour. Whip the last measure of whipped cream with the powdered sugar and Gran Marnier and set aside, in the fridge, too. When it’s time to serve, transfer the mousse into a pastry bag equipped with a large star tip and using a circular motion, pipe an undulating swirl of mousse into eight each large red wine glasses.

6.      Top with rosettes of the whipped cream and then sprinkle with the grated white chocolate candy bar, a mint sprig, and if desired, a Maraschino cherry.  Then, it’s time to serve your mousses!

This is one of my most favored mousse recipes that I learned from another top restaurant that jealously guarded its recipe from outsiders.  So what did I do? I got a job there in the summertime for three weeks while on vacation from my regular, country club job, and stole it with my eyes along with the rest of their dessert recipes.  Here it is for your dining pleasure!  

As I said yesterday, I have had a great time today and as always enjoy my opportunities to write for the Elemental News of the Day. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun!

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came.

I will be back tomorrow to teach you how to make a classic dessert by the great French chef, Auguste Escoffier (1846-1935), the father of modern French cooking, Peach Melba. Then, I will be here Saturday and Sunday and we will continue making some final desserts before Chef James “JT” Tobiason comes on board on Monday 08-29-2011 with whatever he wants to do for a week!  Anyhow, please be sure to visit Amazon.com and maybe buy a Steve Miller Band album and/or buy a cookbook! See you tomorrow! Bye!    

Thank you, my friends!

Murph MacDougal

Murph MacDougal

Certified Club Manager, ACF Member, Foodserver/Bartender and professional Chef and Baker

_______________________________________________________________________

This is a picture of me when I was a young chef in the kitchen back in 1975. I apprenticed underneath my father and spent six years working for him in his British-Irish Restaurant in Fresno, California. I later moved to Frazier Park, California, and spent quite a few years working in the area and that's where I met Stinkbug. Anyhow, I am now working at a country club over on the coast near San Luis Obispo.

---30---

END Commentary for Thursday, August 25, 2011 by Chef Murph MacDougal



Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chef Murph MacDougal

Recipes created by Chef Murph MacDougal on July 12, 1987 in Bakersfield, CA.

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          SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY’S ONE-AND-ONLY STINKBUG


                                                                             
                                                                                                                                                          
This is #1290, a 20” x 16" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Life among the Petunias." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

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