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Sunday, July 10, 2011

“Hawaiian and Polynesian Recipes, Pt. VII: Sweet’n’Sour Pork—cooked in the Traditional Way: Pan-fried and covered with a Red, Sweet’n’Sour Sauce”

Canned Heat’s thirty-eighth album, 2003’s “Friends in the Can” (Ruff Records) is yet another great album put out by the Heat.  We are true fans of this band and suggest that all of you become fans, too.  We admire longevity and this band has it, for sure.  We are nuts about this CD and urge you to rush out and buy it via using the handy link which will take you directly to Amazon.com so you can buy it NOW!  Thanks, the Elemental News of the Day.






                                                                                      

Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 530 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!



                                                                                   



                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                              


Chef Murph MacDougal

END Commentary 07-11-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 1,879.



CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Monday, July 11, 2011 by Chef Murph MacDougal

HAWAIIAN AND POLYNESIAN RECIPES, PT. VII

 Hawaiian and Polynesian Recipes, Pt. VII: Sweet’n’Sour Pork—cooked in the Traditional Way: Pan-fried and covered with a Red, Sweet’n’Sour Sauce



Bakersfield, CA, 07-11-2011 M:  I’m back and glad to be, too, as today I have a great recipe for you: Sweet’n’Sour pork, cooked in the traditional way: battered and either wok-or-pan-fried and then buried in a tangy sweet, red sweet’n’sour sauce that will leave you speechless.  Cooking has been my life for as long as I can remember and my love for foods of the orient, of Hawaii, of Polynesia, knows no boundaries.  Over the course of my career, I have worked in Asian restaurants by apprenticing and working for hardly anything in order to be paid in the currency that most mattered: expertise.  Asian chefs are typically very difficult to work for but I was lucky as I found a Filipino chef who not only took me under his arm but was happy to pass on the knowledge of his sixty years’ kitchen service.  When one is lucky enough to find someone who WANTS to instruct them and is willing to do it with kindness and patience that, my friends, is a very fortunate situation in which to find one’s self.

            Our dish today is one that benefits from use of a wok, if you have one, as that’s the traditional “frying pan” of the Asians.  They place over a high flame and add their ingredients and when it flares up, it’s exciting to see.  I recall looking in the backdoor of a Chinese restaurant on Maui back in the 1980’s and watching the Chinese chefs through the screen door as they flambéed one food after another before my eyes.  I walked in and asked for a job and the chef, a man named Wong, told me to return the next day and my instruction would begin.  I was so excited that I went home and called my folks and told them of my good luck and they were extremely happy for me. I spent the next two years working for Chef Wong before he called it a day and returned to his homeland to retire.

            Well, let’s get started, we have quite a bit to do, shall we?

SWEET’N’SOUR PORK





1. To serve four:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
1
#
Boneless lean pork, cut into one-inch cubes


cornstarch

Frying Oil
3
Cups
Peanut oil

Batter
.25
Cup
Cornstarch

.25
Cup
All-purpose flour

.25
Cup
Chicken stock

1
Each
Large egg
Beaten
1
Teaspoon
Sea salt

Sweet’n’Sour Sauce
.25
Cup
Granulated sugar

.25
Cup
Red wine vinegar

1
Tablespoon
Peanut oil

1
Teaspoon
Minced garlic

.5
Cup
Chicken broth

1
Teaspoon
Soy sauce

Thickening Agent
1
Tablespoon
Cornstarch OR clear gel

.125
Cup
Cold water

The Garnishes
.25
Cup
Sliced waterchestnuts

.25
Cup
Julienned scallions

1
Large
Green bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, de-ribbed, cut into 1” squares
1
Each
Medium carrot, peeled and julienned

1
Cup
Bamboo shoots

1
Small
Yellow onion, julienned




Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready. Heat the peanut oil in a large skillet or wok.

2.      Make the batter mixture and set aside. Dust the pork in cornstarch and then dip in the batter. Shake off excess and when the oil’s hot, plunge the pork cubes into it taking care to stand back.  Cook them until golden-brown, shaking the pan to keep them moving.

3.      Combine the ingredients listed under the sauce and place over a high flame.  Combine the cold water and cornstarch or clear gel and when the sauce mixture is boiling, whisk it in and tighten the sauce.  Allow it to clear up and boil for a minute or so and then lower flame and simmer.

4.      When the pork cubes are cooked, transfer to the sauce.  Add the garnishes and combine well.  To serve, place a scoop of steamed white rice on each of four plates and spoon sweet’n’sour pork over each mound.  Accompany with a stir-fried vegetable of your choice and enjoy.

This is the classic way of preparing sweet’n’sour pork and it’s one your family will enjoy.  Keep this recipe handy as you will be using it time and time again!  Here’s a steamed white rice recipe for you:





STEAMED RICE





1. To serve 6-8:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
2
Cups
Boiling water

1
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.125
Teaspoon
White pepper

1
Cup
Hinode short-grained rice




Method:

1.      Place water in an oven-proof saucepot equipped with a tight-fitting lid and add the spices.  Turn a standard oven to 375°F or a convection oven to 325°F and have ready.

2.      Bring water to a boil and when it is, add the rice and stir.  It will momentarily sink to the bottom and stick and this is the crucial stage: stir it as quickly as possible to get it waterborne and stir over the next minute or two frequently.  Bring it to a boil once more and keep there until the water has dropped to the level of the rice; then, slap on the lid, place inside your preheated oven and bake for 25 minutes or until the rice has absorbed the liquid.

3.      Check and when the water’s been absorbed, remove the pot from the oven and crack the lid.  Allow the steam to escape for a minute or so and then fluff it with a fork.  Now, either serve the rice or refrigerate it in a shallow pan for use later in the day.

4.      To serve, spoon it directly onto the plate or place it in a serving bowl and garnish with a little bit of freshly minced parsley and a sprinkle or two of Spanish paprika. OR, spray 6-8 soup cups with PAM or some such other food release spray and place a few pimientos, parsley flakes, or slivered scallions in the bottom and pack with the cold rice. Heat in your microwave for 2-3 minutes or until piping hot.  Slap the soup cups on each of 6-8 plates so the rice slides out with its garnish and accompany with an entrée of choice and vegetables. Either way, this is a great recipe.

No cook is complete without a recipe for steamed white rice.  This is the basic formula for making rice in the oven or on the top of your stove. You don’t need a rice cooker to make good rice.  Rice cookers are nice but why waste money, right?

Like my friend, V. Vicky Mazarotti yesterday, I, too, have had a great time today and as always enjoy my opportunities to write for the Elemental News of the Day. We urge our readership to write to us and leave comments and if there are any of you, who would care to write an article for us, please get in touch via Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, P.O. Box 20669, Bakersfield, CA 93390-0669.  We obviously don’t pay anything but you will be given a full byline and that’s worth its weight in gold.  We want as many people who want to write to be able to do so and we believe that by presenting a forum for our fellow chefs, we are doing something for our beloved industry.  We love diversity and hope to add new and different authors to our pantheon of chefs, food and beverage directors, and culinary professionals.  Come on and join us, it’ll be fun!

Please remember to avoid doing business with AARC Technology in Bakersfield, CA.  These people don’t care about the small customer anymore but instead put all of their attentions onto their corporate customers. It’s sad to not remember why one has the success they do or from where it came. Anyhow, have a great day and we’ll meet again. Take care.  

Thank you, my friends!

Murph MacDougal

Murph MacDougal

Certified Club Manager, ACF Member, Foodserver/Bartender and professional Chef and Baker
This is a picture of me when I was a young chef in the kitchen back in 1975. I apprenticed underneath my father and spent six years working for him in his British-Irish Restaurant in Fresno, California. I later moved to Frazier Park, California, and spent quite a few years working in the area and that's where I met Stinkbug. Anyhow, I am now working at a country club over on the coast near San Luis Obispo.
_______________________________________________________________________

---30---

END Commentary for Monday, July 11, 2011 by Chef Murph MacDougal

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chef Murph MacDougal.

Recipes created by Chef Murph MacDougal on June 07, 1984 in Seattle, WA.

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This is #1309, a 12” x 16" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, “Yucca Bloom." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures I
                                                                                 

       This is a photo of Brian Carrick performing with the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers at South High School on 08-21-1977. He's singing lead on a song.

  This is a photo of Chuck Swartz performing at Lake Isabella, CA, on 10-06-1978. Chuck was a fantastic guitarist.

This is a photo of Brian Carrick and Chuck Swartz relaxing after the gig with the Plynth at South High on 09-29-1978.

This is a shot of the gear out in the yard at Shamrock on 07-07-1978 in preparation of being loaded for a gig. The Magnolia Hilltop Brewers had a wall of sound.

      This is a photo of bassist/vocalist Victor Gaona on 09-15-1978 at a gig somewhere in Kern County, CA.  Vic was a great musician.

This is a photo of Victor Gaona (bass/vocals) and Chuck Swartz (lead guitar/vocals) at Garces Memorial High School on 11-04-1978 rocking out with the MHB.

This is a photo of Victor Gaona and Lupe Carrick on 11-05-1978 after arriving home from a gig. Lupe was Brian Carrick's wife.

    This is unbaked Pain de Levain at the stockdale country club in 1989 on the bakers's table.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

























                                                                      

                                                                                  
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