Popular Posts

Sunday, June 5, 2011

“SOUP SEMINAR, PT. III--CREAM OF ASPARAGUS AND CREAM OF ONION SOUPS”

Canned Heat’s second album, “Boogie with Canned Heat” came out in 1968 and continued on with the rocking psychedelic blues that the band pioneered.  It was a great album and this is a great band, definitely one that every serious collector of the genre needs to add to their collection.  The original band was the best version albeit they did some amazing work with a variety of guitarists when Henry “Sunflower” Vestine was locked up for dope.  All-in-all, this is a great album and I do suggest you buy it NOW. All you have to do is to use the handy link and go to Amazon.com and buy it NOW!  Thanks, the Elemental News of the Day.




                                                                   

Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 565 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!



                                                                                      



                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                                 


Santanamos “El Chilote” De Soto

END Commentary 06-06-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,566.

CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Monday, June 06, 2011 by Chef Santanamos “El Chilote” De Soto

SOUP SEMINAR, PT III —CREAM OF ASPARAGUS AND CREAM OF ONION SOUPS

CREAM OF ASPARAGUS AND CREAM OF ONION SOUPS

Bakersfield, CA, 06-06-2011 M:  Good morning!  Once again, I am here to teach you about making classic soups as I know you all enjoy doing that.  When I was a young man, I learned things in order from the chefs around me: first, I learned how to make biscuits and gravy; next, I learned how to cook breakfast; then, I learned how to bake the rudimentary things and finally, I learned how to make soups.  Knowing these basic things allowed me to get a variety of jobs, some of them good, most of them bad, but they were all proving grounds for me to perfect my craft as a young fry cook.  There are all different levels of being a “chef” and just as there are high-powered chef positions like the Beverly Hills Country Club, there are a variety of lower-class establishments that need competent chefs to run their kitchens and pay them fairly well.  Sure, nothing like the country club, but still, there are a multitude of levels and a multitude of pay-scales.  What I am saying is that there are all sorts of positions for one to find employment and it depends on how high one wants to rise.  Some positions need years of training and apprenticeship whereas others are all on-the-job-based.  Whatever one chooses to do, making soup is an important money-making skill that will help you control your food cost while pleasing your customers.  

We are going to learn how to make TWO soups today: Cream of Asparagus and Cream of Onion Soups, both of which are time-tested classics and both of which really don’t use the best parts of the vegetables but merely the scraps.  Scraps are where the money is made and it’s all about achieving the flavor, flavor is what makes the soup successful and most of that is derived from good stock.  You can look back at our series on the Pantry Chef and the Prepmaster as there you will find the secrets to making the successful stocks that will win you awards and high praise.  Trust me, I know these things.   Stock-making is one of the most important things one can learn from any talented chef and if you can do that, you can become not only a soup-making Pantry Chef but a Saucier as our previous series outlined for you.  The basics are what allow you to shine like a star and to become successful and to win aplomb from your work.  Never pay attention to the televised assholes running around like a bunch of geeks dropping f-bombs every other word; no, they’re a bunch of stupid fools. Listen to me, Stinkbug, and all the rest of us who will share with you the talent of more than 500 combined years of working in professional foodservice, my friends!

Cream of Asparagus is one of those all-time classics that people find irresistible and believe is made from nothing but the finest parts of the vegetable: the tips. Silly people, it’s mostly made from the ends that have been peeled to expose the flesh and the scraps that should or would have been tossed into the garbage bin.  These things are saved from vegetable preparation and the Pantry Chef or Prepmaster stocks them off as soon as possible and saves the broth for use in soup a day or two later OR it’s frozen for use at a later time. Either way, the stock is rich in flavor and is a damned good money-making item that people nowadays who lack training carelessly throw down the garbage disposal whereas the intelligent and well-trained professional makes money and fans off of. Training is what it’s all about and if your establishment has a bone-headed dunderhead for a chef, this is a job that you can aspire to take for yourself.  Always show the other guy up but do it with class, never make yourself look bad.

If you’re ready, let’s make our first soup!

Cream of Asparagus Soup

About 3 quarts of soup:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
5
Cups
Chicken stock
3
Cups
Thinly sliced young asparagus, peel root ends w/ peeler
1
Each
Bay leaf
5
Cups
Half-and-half
1.25
Cups
Melted butter
2.75
Cups
Minced celery
2
Cups
Minced onions
1
Cup
Finely-chopped asparagus
1.5
Cups
All-purpose flour
2.25
Teaspoons
Kosher salt OR LESS
.75
Teaspoon
White pepper
1.125
Teaspoon
Ground coriander
3/8
Teaspoon
Nutmeg
.75
Teaspoon
Whole thyme
.5
Teaspoon
Colman’s dry mustard
2
Tablespoons
Sherry

Method:

1.      Mis-en-place: have everything ready to go.      

2.      Combine the first two ingredients together in a saucepan over low-to-medium flame along with the bay leaf and simmer until called for.  Likewise, place half-and-half in another pot over low heat to keep it warm until called for.

3.      Heat melted butter in a larger pot over medium-high flame and when hot, stir in celery, onions, and asparagus tips. Sautee until slightly tender and then stir in all-purpose flour. This is known as your “mirepoix” (mir-a-pwas) or your soup thickener.  Cook just until the veggies are tender but don’t turn them into mush—if you do so, this is a cardinal sin in a restaurant kitchen and I would have to FIRE you!

4.      Cook, stirring constantly, until mirepoix has cooked 2-3 minutes.  Add to this the salt, pepper, coriander, nutmeg, thyme, and the dry mustard. 

5.      When seasonings have been blended in, gradually pour in the chicken stock with the asparagus.  When well-blended, meaning with NO lumps of visible mirepoix, pour in the warm half-and-half. 

6.      Bring the soup to a boil, stirring all the while so that it doesn’t scorch on the bottom and then lower flame to a bare minimum, and allow the soup to cook 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally. When time’s up, stir in the sherry and enjoy.

7.      Note: as for the cooking times, NOTHING is carved in stone, they’re only guidelines. Use your common sense and if things seem like they’re done sooner than predicted, FINE! Go with that!  We want it to be perfect, not carved in Biblical-stone! 

Cream of Asparagus soup is always an elegant dinner hit especially when the weather assumes a chill.  It is a wonderful opener for better things to come. Generally, this is a small quantity so it’s doubtful that you would have any leftovers but if you do, pour it into a shallow pan, take a piece of wax paper and spray it with PAM and press on the surface to keep a skin from forming. Usually anything with a starchy roux thickener like the mirepoix will grow a skin upon being chilled so place the PAM-sprayed wax paper atop it to foil it. Once it’s chilled you may place it in a Tupperware container or other such plastic container and sealed with a lid. It can be kept in your refrigerator for a couple of days or frozen for a month. Enjoy! 

Cream of Onion soup like the previous one is one that utilizes all of the scrap onion parts that are leftover from cleaning and preparing the vegetable for use throughout the kitchen.  You see, in the old days, the Pantry Chef or Prepmaster would clean ALL of the vegetables for use by all of the other chefs and store them in the Pantry Walk-in reefer.  He or she would also save all of the scraps and stock them off just as he or she did with the asparagus.  This is what making money is all about: utilizing EVERYTHING!

Our next soup starts right NOW:

Cream of Onion Soup

About 3 quarts of soup:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
5
Cups
Chicken stock
5
Cups
Half-and-half
1
Each
Bay leaf
1
Cup
Melted butter
3.75
Cups
Minced yellow onions
1
Cup
Finely grated carrots
2.75
Teaspoons
Onion powder
2.25
Teaspoons
Kosher salt
1
Teaspoon
Ground coriander
1
Teaspoon
White pepper
.75
Teaspoon
Whole thyme
1.25
Cup
All-purpose flour
1
Tablespoon
Onion juice
.5
Cup
Marsala sherry

Method:

1.      Combine first THREE ingredients listed in a saucepot over a low-to-medium flame, once again, and allow it to simmer. 

2.      In a larger saucepot heat the melted butter to a sizzle over a medium-high flame.  When it is, add the onion, carrot, celery, thyme, onion powder and coriander.  Cook until veggies are slightly tender, stirring all the while. 

3.      When they are, stir in the all-purpose flour and cook 2-3 minutes stirring all the while.  Cook this mirepoix for a few minutes so the floury taste disappears and the veggies are tender but remember—stir frequently to protect it from scorching!

4.      When time’s up, pour in the contents of the first pot taking care to NOT scald you, either by splashing it or by steam.  Pour it in gradually whisking all the while to break up any lumps of roux. You want it to become a perfect marriage of roux and creamy liquid.  If the roux ISN’T dissolved in the proper way, there’s no way it can be fixed once it’s done.

5.      Upon successful completion of combining the two soup parts, bring it to a boil, stirring all the while, and keep it there for 2-3 minutes.  After it has boiled the required time, lower flame to a bare minimum and allow it to simmer 15-20 minutes.  As it simmers, add the salt, pepper, onion juice, and the sherry. Either when time’s up or by your best judgment that it’s done, it’s ready to serve. 

Now, if necessary, always adjust your soups’ flavoring when they’re done. I generally try to go with lower spicing and seasoning as the guest or the diner can always adjust the soup to their liking. Remember, too, that as a cream soup cooks, the flavors generally intensify so like I say, go with less knowing that you can readjust LATER. In addition to this, check consistency; if the soup is too thick, dilute it with a bit of the cream and if too thin, make cornstarch slurry and whisk it in over medium-high heat. Normally as the soups sit over low flame, they will tighten up so again, use your own judgment. 

Now for those who like a really creamy soup with little or no vegetable, run the finished soup through a food mill or puree in a blender or food processor and this will solve that situation.  You can also take the mirepoix vegetables prior to cooking them and puree them so they’re minimal.  Virtually everything is open to adjustment or correction, everything that is EXCEPT for clumping up the roux. This is your most important soup procedure, the combining of the liquid and the mirepoix.  Do it gradually while whisking like a demon! 

So, you may use this soup as a main dish or as an opener just like the first soup. You may garnish the soup in a tureen or in individual soup bowls by sprinkling a little bit of paprika or nutmeg AND fresh minced parsley.  Always serve with plenty of French bread and fresh butter and live like the French kings did as this is where most of these soups hail from. They are personal recipes created by Stinkbug and published in his column, “What’s Cooking,” in The Bakersfield Californian newspaper back in the 1980s.

  -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thank you friends for being here again today and tomorrow, I will be back for one more go around and then someone else will step in and make some more delicious foods for your enjoyment.  We all love to cook here and have been doing it for many years as you can guess from more than 500 combined years of experience.  Each of us has worked anywhere from 30 to 60 years in professional foodservice and that makes us smarter than most other foodie blogs on the Internet.  Eventually, we shall release a cookbook! Anyhow, I will see you all tomorrow.  See you then!  

Muchas gracias, buen amigos!

El Chilote

Santanamos “El Chilote” De Soto

CWC, ACF, Maui Chefs’ Society

_______________________________________________________________________

---30---

END Commentary for Monday, June 06, 2011 by Chef Santanamos “El Chilote” De Soto.

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chef Santanamos “El Chilote” De Soto.

Carrick, Brian. “Two More Soups whet the Appetite for “fall” Food.” The Bakersfield Californian. 22-September-1988: Food, C15.

KEEP READING THE ELEMENTARY NEWS OF THE DAY FOR THE BEST OF CULINARY POLITICS!

http://elementalnewsoftheday.blogspot.com/

“Stinky” of the Elemental News of the Day for the best of the news, politics, sports, foodservice, hotel and restaurant business, the end times, the end of days, the apocalypse, armageddon, and whatever else happens to pop up!

  

                                                                                   



          STINKBUG
                                                                                        

                                                                                      
                                                                         
This is #1250, an 8” x 10" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, "Banquet." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures I

                                                                         
This is a shot of Brian Carrick behind his Rodgers' Drum Kit at Taft, California on 09-15-1976. We always had a great time in Taft and enjoyed visiting the girls of Fellows, CA, right next door. We may have fathered a bunch of kids there while the ladies' husbands were working in the oilfields.

                                                                      
 This is a shot of lead guitarist and vocalist Randall Kyles at Delano on 12-03-1976. Delano was a rough town in which to perform. We still knocked 'em out, however!

          This is a shot of Magnolia Hilltop Brewers' bassist, Victor Gaona, on 10-01-1976 at Shamrock during a rehearsal. Vic was a great musician and vocalist and was with the band from start to finish. 

This is a shot of action in one of the bedrooms at Shamrock on 08-27-1976. Shamrock was a well-known party house as this is where the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers were based. 

      This is a shot of Randall Kyles' principal axe, his trusty Gibson on 10-01-1976 at rest before his amplifier.                                                                                                                                                   
This is a shot of Stinkbug's famed Sourdough French Bread at the Stockdale Country Club on 11-12-1988. He was the best baker in the entire county of Kern.                                                        





















                                                                                     


                                                                           

Magnolia Hilltop Brewers and What's Cookin' Productions Trademark of Quality and Symbol of Integrity. Copyright 06-06-2011, all rights reserved. No unauthorized reproductions of any of this material are permissible unless granted by written permission. Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.




























                                                                                   


MAGNOLIA HILLTOP BREWERS PRODUCTIONS

                                                             















No comments:

Post a Comment

Please leave comments! Thanks! The American Institute of Culinary Politics-Elemental News of the Day!