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Wednesday, June 1, 2011

“Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. XVII”


                                                                              
 The Youngbloods’ eleventh album, “The Youngbloods: Euphoria 1965-1969,” was another compilation album released in 1998 and is available on CD.  Like other compilation albums released in later years, this one has twenty-five of their best songs all in one place plus a booklet and all sorts of other goodies. This band is worthy of any serious collector’s attention and this album is a very good retrospective of the good old days. All you have to do is to use the handy link and go to Amazon.com and buy it NOW!  Thanks, the Elemental News of the Day.

                                                          

Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 569 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!




                                                                               


                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                                  


Stinkbug

END Commentary 06-02-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,610.

CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Thursday, June 02, 2011 by Chef Kilgore Randalini

KITCHEN NOBILITY—THE SAUCIER, PT. XVII

Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. XVII

Bakersfield, CA, 06-02-2011 Th:  This should make all of you very happy! We have one more installment of this series after today’s as there were a few additional sauces we needed to add to this chapter.  Hoorah! It’s always good to have additional information that has come from our collective cookbooks and made available to you, our beloved readers!  We love to cook and know that you do, too, and even though we have tons of serious competition that relegates us to the backwater, we believe that word of mouth and dedicated blogging will one day bring us the readership the bigger bloggers and websites have to their credit.  That is all you have to do: tell ONE friend a day about the Elemental News of the Day and spread the word just like Thunderbird wine! That used to be the saying when we were in high school back in the early 1970’s and some of us, the late 1960’s was “spread the word: Thunderbird.” Cheap wine is always good!  

Yesterday, I was talking to you about all of these asshole chef shows in which all sorts of characters that look like trash are competing to become the Greatest Chef in the World and other such bullcrap.  They get these chefs to be the judges and then they push the idiot contestants to the limit in order to get them to drop F-bombs right and left so they can bleep ‘em constantly.  It’s really tragic as all of the younger generation of cooks who have not had the privilege of going through the American Culinary Federation’s apprenticeship program truly believe that this is how you do it: be outrageous and combine acting with the art of cooking and looking like scum hanging out on Nineteenth Street in Bakersfield, California.  I truly wish the TV producers would make an effort to present the profession for what it really is: a classy business in which serious people work to create the best dishes for their guests and to do it with class, elegance, and style.  One should not look like a biker or an NBA player all covered in tats and with studs in their tongues; no, please, people really need to look like chefs! Someone do it right and get all of this crap off of Bravo TV and the networks, show chefs for what they truly are and should be: artisans in the business of creation!

A case in point is the fool who’s on Hell’s Kitchen, Chef Ramsey.  That pretender feels that by throwing fits and humiliating the fools he’s supposed to be helping that he’s accomplishing something important when he’s nothing more than a foreign hick on TV.  Now, he’s on the Master Chef show or whatever that drivel is called and is judging people who would never be allowed to work in a real kitchen other than as a pot-or-dishwasher.  It makes me sick to see these people misinterpreting the traditions of Auguste Escoffier, James Beard, and Julia Child by dropping F-bombs right and left like a B-52 dropping fucking bombs on trembling terrorists! For God’s Sake, man, get a hold of yourself and do the right thing and make the profession what the American Culinary Federation has attempted to make it for the past ninety years or more.  Continuity is important just as is professionalism and there’s no room for “pirate chefs” destroying the industry from within.  The television is a powerful tool and it’s the one form of media that can transform anything into something else merely by being there.  I urge all of you to avoid this smuck and find other ways to entertain yourselves!

Let’s get on with our sauces for today: we have more exciting sauces such as oriental treats and another salsa or two. One thing you can bet on is that each and every sauce will be a treat with which to amaze your friends and family whenever you have them over to dinner. People like to be dazzled by creativity and these offerings will definitely do that for sure.  I like the Pad Thai Sauce, for example, it’s a tasty treat that is unexpected by most diners at home and is one that is sure to please.  All of these have been used time and time again in a variety of kitchens across many states by all of us.  We like to experiment and to do new and unusual things but one thing’s for sure: we do it with a certain measure of class and never showboat around.  It’s important to always have respect for this wonderful profession and to never run it down into the ground.  We have to pass on to the next generation the things that have made all of us great in what we do.   So, if you’re ready, let us begin!

(#376) MANGO-PINEAPPLE SALSA

Yield: 2  quarts plus:

About 30 minutes:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
 1
Small
Pineapple, peeled and medium-diced
6
Each
Mangos, peeled and diced
1
Medium
Red onion, very small diced
1
Bunch
Scallions (green part only) very thinly sliced
1
Each
Red bell pepper, stemmed, seeded , de-ribbed; diced small
.5
Bunch
Cilantro, chopped
2
Tablespoons
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
2
Teaspoons
Kosher salt
1
Teaspoon
Black pepper
2
Tablespoons
Rice wine vinegar
2
Each
Jalapenos, stemmed, seeded, de-veined and minced

Method:

     1. Combine as per preceding recipe following the hints outlined in the one before that. Label, date, & refrigerate.

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     As we plunged headlong into Thai cooking at SOCC, the next item we jumped on was an off-the-wall shrimp dish that utilized the following sauce. To be honest with you, I think the dish sucked (as you will see later on in the seafood chapter) but since this book is as much about my personal history as well as about my culinary history, it is necessary to include everything

here so please bear with me (and there might be some of you reading this who might actually like this kind of stuff):

(#377) PAD THAI SAUCE

Yield:    about  2-1/2  c ___

About  30 minutes:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
 .5
Cup
Rice wine vinegar
.5
Cup
Lime juice
.75
Cup
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
1
Tablespoon
Thai chili sauce
.5
Cup
Nuac Pham Vietnamese fish sauce
2
Tablespoons
Shoyu
.25
Cup
Catsup

 Method:

     1. Combine all ingredients together in a pot on the stove over medium-high flame. As soon as it approaches a boil, begin whisking in a slurry made of cornstarch to the desired thickness for the sauce you’re making. We’d use this as a sauce for the vegetables and noodles that went a dish called “Tamarind Prawns”.

     The following is what we glazed the prawns with:

(#378) TAMARIND GLAZE

Yield:   about 1-1/2 cups:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
 1
# block
Tamarind
6
Cups
Water PLUS
12
Ounces
Brown sugar
2
Tablespoons
Minced shallots
2
Tablespoons
Minced garlic
2
Tablespoons
Thai chili sauce

Method:

     1. Combine all ingreds in a sauce pot and reduce over medium-high heat. Generally, more water is needed so don’t be afraid to add it. All the time that it’s cooking, continue to try and break down the block of tamarind.

     2. Eventually, you’ll end up with a foul-looking pulp so add water again to kind of make a paste. Now, this is as far as the chef went with it but every night when the diners ordered this particular dish, the sauce would not adhere itself to the cooked shrimp so this is what i did:

     3. I forced it through a sieve and then combined water with it to which I added a cornstarch slurry to thicken it to the proper glazing consistency. Sometimes, you have to take the chef’s work and make it better without telling him so. We chefs hate to be corrected by our inferiors but hey, if my dishwasher can tell me how to make a crown rack of lamb better than I, I’d be stupid not to listen to him, wouldn’t I? (Besides, lots of guys who once were chefs but aren’t now because they didn’t save money, were alcoholics, drug users, had a bunch of wives are reduced to that level... mm-mm, sounds like me in a few more years...)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     We use this as a topping for a seared filet mignon served sliced atop a potato pancake so it varies with each preparation:

(#379) PORTOBELLO-BALSAMIC RAGU

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
 15
Each
Portobello mushrooms, stemmed and all black trimmed off and then oiled and grilled on a flattop or in a frying pan.  Then cut them in ¾” dice. Sauté with the following:
2
Each
Yellow onions, peeled and fine-diced
3
Tablespoons
Minced garlic
2/3
Cup
Balsamic vinegar
Veal demi glace

Method:                          

     1. Basically, we combine the first 5 ingreds together and keep on the cold table. When the order comes in for the seared filet, we place some of this mixture into a sauce pan and add some demi which we then allow to reduce to the thickness of a “ragu” or very thick topping. And, since it’s a reduction, ALWAYS pay close attention to your seasoning or otherwise it will be uneatable due to the concentration of spice. Spice when it’s thickened, not before!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(#380) TEMPURA DIPPING SAUCE

Yield:  3   cups_____

About 15 minutes:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
 5
Tablespoons
Coleman’s dry mustard
.25
Cup
Water

     1. Combine the above 2 ingreds together in the bowl of an electric mixer. Then, blend in the remaining ingreds a little bit at a time:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
 1.75
Cups
Shoyu
3
Ounces
Rice wine vinegar
6.5
Tablespoons
Oyster sauce
1.75
Teaspoons
Sesame oil
.25
Teaspoon
Hot chili oil

     Blend in remaining ingredients and use as the dipping sauce for tempura dishes.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Anytime you go out to eat in a Chinese restaurant and have shrimp, this is the sauce they give you to accompany it:

(#381) ASIAN SWEET HOT MUSTARD

Yield:    1-1/2  cups ____________

About 5 minutes:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
 1
Cup
Dijon mustard
.25
Cup
Sesame oil
.25
Cup
Rice wine vinegar
2
Tablespoons
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
1
Tablespoon
Kosher salt

Method:

     1. Mix everything together, label, date and refrigerate.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Someplace, somewhere, somebody got it into their heads that everybody wanted fiery hot chicken wings. Just like nachos which can be downright disgusting depending upon who makes them they have crept into the American palate. I think that Tyson or one other of the big poultry manufactures needed a place to unload their wings so this is what they came up with in Washington state; enjoy:

(#382) SAUCE for BUFFALO WINGS

Yield:    about    1-3/4  c_________

About 15 to 20 minutes:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
 5/8
Cup
Whole butter
1.5
Ounces
Barbeque sauce
1
Tablespoon
Cayenne pepper
.75
Teaspoon
White pepper
.75
Teaspoon
Black pepper
1.75
Teaspoon
Granulated onion
1.75
Teaspoon
Granulated garlic
.5
Cup
Louisiana-brand hot sauce

Method:

     1. Melt the butter over low flame. Skim the surface of any fat that rises to the top and then when all of the butter has been drawn out, combine the remaining whey with the skimmed fat.

     2. Add to the whey the remaining ingredients and blend together well. Set the bowl with the liquid butter in a larger bowl filled with ice and then slowly begin to whisk in the whey mixture. Continue whisking until the fat begins to solidify.

     3. When all has hardened, scoop it into a storage bucket. The idea behind this sauce, I’m sure, was to make another emulsified item that wouldn’t break down... but in the end, butter still behaves like butter. At least it tastes good, I just get so tired of this “hot before flavor” attitude, I want to taste the flavor of the dish and determine its merits before I want to get my mouth flame-thrown off the face of the earth!



  -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I will be back tomorrow so we can finish off the Saucier Series tomorrow.  We have a few more good ones to go and you can be sure that the best has been saved for last.  That is usually what we try to do when we bring a series to a close: give you the biggest bang for your buck! We like to cook and we know you like to cook, too, ergo, we pile it on the best we can just as though we are at the five-dollar Chinese buffet on ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT-NIGHT!  I mean, what could be better than that? See you tomorrow, have a great day, bye!

Thank you!

Kilgore Randalini

Kilgore Randalini
Working Chef, ACF.



---30---

END Commentary for Thursday, June 02, 2011 by Chef Kilgore Randalini

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chef Kilgore Randalini.

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          THE STINKSTER
                                                                                      

                                                                                     
                                                                                  
This is #1239, a 36” x 24" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, "Lupine and Saguaros." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures I


                                                                                            
                                      Chef Stinkbug in thought about his upcoming wedding...

       Magnolia Hilltop Brewers drummer Brian Carrick on 09-12-1976 at the end of a gig somewhere in Kern County, California. A born percussionist, he was the first in and the last out due to the size of his drum kit. 

This is a shot of lead guitarist Randall Kyles on 11-12-1976 at a gig somewhere in Kern County. A talented musician, he's going to be Stinkbug's best man at his Halloween wedding. 


  This is a shot of Victor Gaona on 09-12-1976 at the end of the night enjoying a cold adult beverage. One of the great bassists of his time, Vic always put 150% into his performances. 

This is a shot of Mrs. Lupe Carrick on 05-14-1977 after a gig somewhere in Bakersfield, CA. The photographer of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers, she worked really hard maintaining the history of the band through her stunning photographs. 

This is a shot of the Beverly Hills Country Club on 11-05-1976 during a trip to the Southland taken by the band on vacation to the Sunset Strip and the pleasure houses that line it. Ah, for the good old days! 

This is a shot of Cherry Cream Pie taken at the Stockdale Country club in 1987. Made by Chef Stinkbug, these were among his best desserts! 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                






















                                                                               

                                                                                  
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