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Wednesday, June 15, 2011

“Hawaiian and Polynesian Recipes, Pt. VI—Chinese Orange Beef”

Canned Heat’s twelfth album, 1973’s “The New Age” (United Artists) saw the band continuing on despite all of the adversity that continued to affect it.  Canned Heat always delivered the goods and did so for a long time and the Seventies was still a good time for them.  This is an excellent album and one that everyone should own.  All you have to do is to use the handy link and go to Amazon.com and buy it NOW!  Thanks, the Elemental News of the Day.






                                                                               
Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 555 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!




                                                                                        


                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                                        


Chef Elvin P. McCardle.

END Commentary 06-16-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 1,968.

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Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Thursday, June 16, 2011 by Chef Elvin P. McCardle

HAWAIIAN AND POLYNESIAN RECIPES, PT. VI

Hawaiian and Polynesian Recipes, Pt. VI—Chinese Orange Beef

Bakersfield, CA, 06-16-2011 Th:  I haven’t written a blog for Stinkbug since March but I’m here today to continue our series on Hawaiian and Polynesian Cuisine!  Yesterday, you had “Oriental Beef and Veggies” whereas today, I am going to teach you how to make Chinese Orange Beef.  That is the lovely thing about the food of the Pacific Islands and the Asian continent, the use of fruits in many of the sauces that accompany their foods.  Fruits are a wonderful ingredient in that they lend themselves so well to many different cuisines and besides that, they’re nutritious and full of all sorts of vitamins and minerals that keep you happy, healthy, and regular!  The last one is extremely important to maintain one’s health and as I’ve spent time in the dietary departments of different hospitals, you tend to learn these things from those in the know.  A good diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables is a good thing and I encourage you to accomplish this each and every day!  It also makes your diet extremely varied and tasty to boot!

Yesterday, the Hooter was talking about beef and the Japanese, about their lack of grazing space and the expense of raising Kobe beef.  On the mainland of Asia, most of the other cultures have plenty of room and raise cattle or water buffalo and slaughter these animals whenever they need meat.  They also eat just about everything else: from pork to poultry, from lamb to goat, and from fish to insect, reptile, and amphibian.  Protein is protein and when you have MILLIONS, if not BILLIONS of mouths to feed, you eat everything that flies, swims, walks, or crawls. It’s all good and it’s only in the west that we tend to frown upon many of these things.  I’ve tried a great deal of different things and all I can say is, most of them are delicious.

Back to what we’re talking about: beef in China is available and this dish is one that uses it.  Combined with many of the standard seasonings like garlic and ginger, vegetables, and whatever else and you have a great dish that is easily made ahead of time and reheated or prepared at the last minute via mis-en-place.  This is what makes it easy for the working family to handle their meals at home: prepare several dishes at the same time by cutting vegetables, fruits, and meats and blanching whatever you can and then chilling until time to use them.  If you do it this way and eat the same thing two nights in a row, you can take care of 4-5 days in ONE day.  Make things easy for yourself!

Chinese Orange Beef



Yield: 3-4 Meals



Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
24
Ounces
Beef, sliced into strips

2
Quarts
Water

1
Piece
Bay leaf

1
Teaspoon
Mingar

.5
Teaspoon
Salt

1
Teaspoon
Sesame oil

2
Cups
Orange juice

1
Cup
Beef broth

1
Cup
Granulated sugar

.25
Cup
Rice wine vinegar

.25
Teaspoon
Minging

.25
Teaspoon
Mingar

1-2
Pieces
Bay leaf

.25
Teaspoon
Chinese five spice

1
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.25
Cup
Soy sauce

1
Tablespoon
Almond extract

.25
Cup
Corn starch or clear gel

1
Cup
Green bell pepper cubes
Blanched
.5
Cup
Red bell pepper cubes
Blanched
1
Cup
Yellow onion cubes
Blanched
.5
Cup
Chinese-style sliced celery
Blanched
.5
Cup
Shredded carrots
Blanched
2
Cups
Broccoli florets, separated
Blanched
.25
Cup
Chopped fine green part of leek only
Blanched
.75
Cup
Chinese-style sliced green onions
Garnish
.75
Cup
Hinode-brand short grain white rice

1.75
Cups
Lightly salted, boiling water

1
Tablespoon
Sesame oil




Method:

1. Mis-en-place: Have everything ready. Slicing something, "Chinese-style" means to slice a vegetable on an angle. Hold a rib of celery between the fingers of one hand with the "hump" to the right and the "valley" to the left and then slice it at an angle and fairly thin. Each slice will appear like a triangular piece. Do the green onions in a similar, thin sliced angle because this looks sharp when used as a garnish.

2. Place the beef in a pot and cover with water and add the next four ingredients—bay leaf, salt, garlic, and sesame oil. Bring to a boil, keep there for several minutes, and then remove from the heat shortly. Take it to the sink and skim off the scum that is on the top. This is the blood in a cooked state and should always be removed whenever you cook beef. When you have done this, return the pot to the stove and cook the beef at a medium-low heat until it is very tender but not falling completely apart. When it has reached this stage, set it aside covered and keeps warm.

3. While the beef is cooking, place the orange juice into a pot and add the beef broth from the pot in which, the beef is cooking and then add the rest of the ingredients up to and including the corn starch/clear gel. The best way to do this is to place the ingredients into the bowl of an electric mixer and mix on low speed until combined. Pour through a strainer into a sauce pot and press any lumps of the starch/gel through it. Place on medium-high heat and bring to a high simmer stirring occasionally. When it begins to boil, keep there for several minutes until thickened and clear (not cloudy). Keep warm.

4. While you have both the sauce and the beef working, prepare the vegetables. The thing about oriental cooking is that the vegetables are supposed to be colorful and well-formed meaning NOT MUSHY! Have a couple of pots with lightly salted boiling water in them and then blanche each vegetable individually. As soon as each is cooked AL DENTE, remove immediately from the boiling water and plunge into ICE WATER to chill quickly. This preserves the BRIGHTNESS and the TEXTURE. As soon as all are done, pour them into a strainer and allow to drain. The only vegetable you don't do this to is the final one, the CHINESE-SLICED GREEN ONIONS because this is the garnish!

5. When the beef is done and the sauce is preparing and the vegetables are blanched and cooling or being drained, prepare the rice. First, turn your oven on at 375°F. Place the water in a pot large enough to hold two cups of prepared rice on the stove, lightly salt, and bring to a boil. As soon as it is, add the rice and stir frequently to keep it from burning on the bottom. Bring it to a boil and keep there until the liquid is close to the level of the rice. Cover with a tight-fitting lid and insert into the oven. Keep it there for 25-30 minutes and then remove and crack the lid so the steam can escape. After a minute or two, add the final measure of sesame oil.

6. When it is getting close to serving time, bring the sauce to medium-high heat and add the beef after you have drained and discarded the remaining liquid. Get it good and hot. Place the cooked vegetables in a bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Insert into your microwave oven for 1.5—2 minutes. Combine the meat and sauce and the vegetables in a large bowl so you can mix. Now, it is time to serve.

7. Place a scoop of rice on each of four plates and press down a little bit. Ladle the orange beef equally over the rice on each plate and allow the sauce to spread out around it. Garnish with the Chinese-sliced green onions and serve. You will find this to be a very enjoyable meal and actually quite easy to make. Once you begin to cook Asian-Pacific-style foods, it will become easier to prepare and to make quickly. The secret is in having everything at the ready, what professional chefs call mis en place or "everything at the ready."

Well, that’s it for this time around, I hope you’ve had a great time today and enjoyed this amazingly good dish.  I’m not sure if I will be returning tomorrow or not but someone will be here. Please support our blog by becoming a subscriber and by accessing the Google advertising links as this brings in the necessary revenue with which to keep the Elemental News of the Day up-and-running.

Thank you!

Elvin C. McCardle

Elvin C. McCardle

American Culinary Federation, Inc., CWC


_____________________________________________________________________

---30---

END Commentary for Thursday, June 16, 2011 by Chef Elvin P. McCardle.

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

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This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chef Elvin P. McCardle.

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This is a photo of Magnolia Hilltop Brewers' drummer, Brian Carrick, on 12-31-1975 at the MHB Annual New Year's Eve gig in Buttonwillow, California. The band always showed up each and every year and put on one of the best shows the western end of Kern County had ever seen.

  This is a shot of Brian Carrick behind his Rodgers' Drum Kit on 12-31-1976 at the Annual MHB New Year's Eve gig in Buttonwillow, California. The band always did well at this show and the cut per member was $150.00 at the time.

This is a shot of guitarist Randall Kyles and bassist Victor Gaona at McFarland, California, on 12-18-1976.  The Magnolia Hilltop Brewers always rocked the hell out of the Central Valley towns.

   This is a shot of lead guitarist Randall Kyles and drummer Brian Carrick on 08-27-1976 at a MHB Rehearsal at Shamrock in Bakersfield, California.  The band always rehearsed here and this was their base of operations.

   This artistic photo is known as "Stud from Jupiter."  It was taken in the backyard of Shamrock in 1976 and no one knows who the individual was that posed for the photo.

This is Baby Snookums on 05-28-1977 outside the backdoor at Shamrock in Bakersfield, California.

     This is a photo of Groucho the Cat on 03-18-1980 at Shamrock in Bakersfield, California.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       


                                                                              

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This is #1281, an 8” x 10" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, "Shoe Repair." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

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