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Tuesday, June 14, 2011

“Hawaiian and Polynesian Recipes, Pt. V—Oriental Beef and Veggies”

Canned Heat’s eleventh album, 1972’s “Historical Figures and Ancient Heads” (United Artists) was released after the death of Alan “Blind Owl” Wilson and featured some new members.  The band continued to rock and this was an excellent album and is one that all serious collectors and fans of the band should own.  The song, “Long Way from L.A.” is wonderful and definitely worth the price of the album alone.  All you have to do is to use the handy link and go to Amazon.com and buy it NOW!  Thanks, the Elemental News of the Day.




                                                                              

Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 556 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!



                                                                              



                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                             


Chef Elmer K. Hootenstein.

END Commentary 06-15-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 1,627.

CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Wednesday, June 15, 2011 by Chef Elmer K. “the Hooter” Hootenstein

HAWAIIAN AND POLYNESIAN RECIPES, PT. V

Hawaiian and Polynesian Recipes, Pt. V—Oriental Beef and Veggies

Bakersfield, CA, 06-15-2011 W:  Hello, again, my friends, I’m here for another day of writing about delicious foods that hail from the western end of the Pacific Rim.  One has to be amazed at the number of cultures that dot the region; you have the western coast of North America with foods running from the southern tip of South America to the far northern tip of North America.  In the midst of the great ocean, you have Polynesia and to the south, you have New Zealand, New Guinea, and Australia; and to the west, you have Thailand, Vietnam, Korea, Japan, China, and Russia and the Philippines.  And, by indirect connection, you have India and Africa around the bend into the Indian Ocean.  Put together, you have more different cuisines throughout this major area than all of the cultures that surround the Atlantic Rim!  Amazing when one thinks of the multitudes of cuisines that surround the Pacific Ocean, it is mindboggling!

Today, we will be making a dish called “Oriental Beef and Veggies” which is sort of Japanese-inspired as it features many of the different foods found in their cooking.  Beef is a delicacy in Japan due to the lack of grazing land but they are famous for their Kobe Beef which is a true taste-treat.  Imagine if our livestock were massaged on a daily basis and did absolutely NO work but instead were babied and carried about so that their muscles didn’t develop?  The Kobe Beef animals are taken care of from birth to death in a very tender, loving way (although being slaughtered isn’t a nice thing) and this is why it costs so much whenever you dine at a Japanese steakhouse.  Our recipe calls for a London broil which is a tougher cut of beef, obviously, but we will cook it in stock for as long as it takes in order to transform it into a very tender, flavorful piece of beef.  It will then be combined with a multitude of oriental flavors and vegetables and transformed into a divine dish that will have your friends and family drooling at the table.  People love it when you can outdo their favorite restaurants and in Bakersfield, California, it’s Bill Lee’s Bamboo Chopsticks, the Far East Café, and the Rice Bowl that we measure oriental restaurants by.

Now, I know that some readers will profane my choices and yes, there are finer oriental restaurants in our city than these diehards from long ago.  But I look at tradition and enjoy the places I went to as a kid with my parents fifty years ago and no matter who else comes to this city and opens up, in the end, I always end up going BACK to these places because of sentimental attachment!  So, today’s dish is an attempt at duplicating those dishes and similar dishes I’ve eaten in Hawaii rather than trying to create something that resembles Haute Oriental Cuisine!  Don’t call me a traitor to my class, friends, I enjoy good food and fine-dining and this is a worthy recipe for you to learn today!  Remember, Stinkbug says we can only present the best and that is what we are doing today!

Our recipe for today is “Oriental Beef and Veggies” and I think you will find this to be an exciting dish to both make and to eat.  As always, think Mis-en-place and have everything read to work with! The secret to being a good chef is the above term, “mis-en-place:” that means having everything in its place.  If you can prepare everything ahead of time so that all you have to do is to put it together and to heat it up prior to serving, you are going to save yourself beacoup time which is always important.  This means, if you can cook the beef and blanch the vegetables ahead of time and put the ingredients for the sauce in a jar or dish, then once you enter the kitchen, BOOM! BAM! Dinner is made in the time it takes to cook the rice! This means you can prepare everything ahead of time the night before and then do the final preparation on the stovetop when you arrive home from work or school. If you double the recipe, you can eat it TWO nights in a row and save yourself even MORE time. Always plot everything out in your head and you will be amazed at how efficient you can and will become! Let’s begin:

ORIENTAL BEEF AND VEGGIES





1. To Feed Four:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
20
Ounces
London broil, cut into slices

1.5
Quarts
Water

1
Tablespoon
Beef base

2
Each
Bay leaves

2
Cups
Julienned carrots

1
Cup
Julienned yellow onions

1
Cup
Green bell pepper, cubed

2
Cups
Jicama, julienned

2
Cups
Reserved beef broth

.5
Cup
 Packed brown sugar

.5
Cup
Granulated sugar

.5
Teaspoon
Granulated garlic

.5
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.5
Teaspoon
 Minced ginger

.25
Cup
Red wine vinegar

2
Tablespoons
Teriyaki sauce

1.5
Cups
Pineapple juice

.25
Teaspoon
Sesame oil

.5
Teaspoon
Almond extract

.5
Teaspoon
Chinese five spice

2
Teaspoons
Chopped pimientos

2
Tablespoons
Cornstarch with water: slurry

2
Tablespoons
Oriental-cut green onions




Method:

1.      Bring the first FOUR ingredients to a boil and then lower to and simmer for about 45 minutes or until the beef is extremely tender. Remove then and plunge into ice water.  Reserve the beef broth.

2.      Blanch the vegetables separately in salted, boiling water. Plunge into ice water and discard cooking water unless needed to bring the beef broth up to the correct amount.

3.      Combine the beef broth with the next NINE ingredients and bring to a boil.  Make a slurry with the cornstarch and thicken the mixture. When a sauce has formed, allow it to simmer for several minutes and then add the final ingredients.

4.      To serve, return the meat to the sauce and heat it up. Heat the veggies in the microwave and combine with the sauce. Place a spoonful of rice in the center of each plate and spoon the meat and veggies over it. Garnish it with slivered green onions and serve.

Note: you can cook your rice a day ahead if you need to and reheat to perfection in the microwave oven.  The only thing is this: be sure it’s cooled COMPLETELY before putting it into the ice box ahead of time.  Rice is one of those funny things that can sour quickly if it’s not handled correctly and no one wants that! It’s a waste of both time and money! Rice isn’t cheap anymore!  Also, no one wants to get foodborne illness either so that means always take precautions and be careful!

Well, that’s it for me, someone else will be here tomorrow! Have a great day and take care of yourselves until next time; bye!

Thank you!

Elmer K. Hootenstein

Elmer K. Hootenstein

CWC, ACF, the Golden State Chefs’ Association



________________________________________________________________________

---30---

END Commentary for Wednesday, June 15, 2011 by Chef Elmer K. “the Hooter” Hootenstein.

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chef Elmer K. “the Hooter” Hootenstein.

The Hooter. “Oriental Beef and Veggies” c/o Polynesian Online Review.  24-June-1997: P. AA 26.

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          STINKBUG

                                                                             
                                                                                             


This is #1279, a 12” x 16" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, "Shoe Sale." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures I
                                                                       
This is a shot of drummer Brian Carrick at Delano, California on 12-03-1976 playing with his band, the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers.  Here, he's looking a bit tired in between sets.

This is a photo of Brian Carrick on 12-31-1976 at the MHB's annual New Year's Eve gig somewhere in Kern County, California interposed with other images.

This is a shot of Lupe Carrick on 01-04-1977 somewhere on the road in Kern County, California. She was one of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewer's main photographers and went everywhere the band went.

      This is a shot of Debbie Kyles, wife of Randall Kyles, guitarist with the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers on 10-23-1976 at Shamrock, the band's home in Bakersfield, California. She was our other photographer.

This is a shot of Gerry Kleier and Victor Gaona, guitar and bass respectively on 01-13-1977 at Shamrock during a band rehearsal/jam. Gerry was not an official member of the band but always jammed with us.

        This is a shot of Randall Kyles, guitar and vocals, and Victor Gaona, bass and vocals, on 08-21-1976 at Shamrock in Bakersfield, California, during a band rehearsal of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers.  They were a powerful duo at the microphone!

  This is another shot of Groucho the Cat on 03-18-1980 after getting her spay. She was a good but problem-making cat, always making mischief.  A big favorite with both Stinkbug and his kids, she was much-loved.



























                                                                             

                                                                             
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Tags:

Hawaiian and Polynesian Recipes, Chef Elmer K. “the Hooter” Hootenstein, Gourmet Cooking, Culinary Delights, Beef Dishes, Hawaiian Cooking, Oriental Cuisine, Japanese Cuisine, Asian Cuisine, Foodservice News.

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