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Wednesday, June 8, 2011

“Classic Bakery Desserts, Pt. XVIII—Lemon Mousse”

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                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                                   


Gervais Krinkelmeier 

END Commentary 06-09-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,172.

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ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Thursday, June 09, 2011 by Chef Gervais Krinkelmeier

CLASSIC BAKERY DESSERTS, PT. XVIII—LEMON MOUSSE

Classic Bakery Desserts, Pt. XVIII—Lemon Mousse

Bakersfield, CA, 06-09-2011 Th:  Hello, everybody, it’s been quite awhile since last I was with you! Today, I should like very much to continue on with our bakery series by presenting to you another classic dessert: Lemon Mousse!  Nowadays, everyone in the foodservice industry reaches for one of the purveyor’s packaged products to which they add cream and sometimes even water.  Unless the foodservice establishment is a major one like a top-notch country club, hotel, or fine-dining establishment, people take the easy way out and forget how to do things from scratch.  That was the whole purpose of my going into the kitchen as a kid was to learn how to do things from the ground up, so to speak, because only when one makes things from scratch does one appreciate the product!  I realize that labor costs being what they are prevents most restaurants, hotels, and institutional facilities from doing things with raw ingredients but it’s important that everyone working in a professional environment know how to do it so they can hold a conversation with folks who have no idea how it’s done! People are impressed by a knowledgeable chef and when one is asked “How do you make this” and you cannot answer, then you and your restaurant look like a bunch of dopes!

Mousse is one of the one of those classic products that in essence is fairly easy to make—if you know what you’re doing, that is.  I had to learn the hard way—by reading cookbooks—but I learned well and managed to go on and develop an entire line of flavored mousses using the basic formula.  The dessert is a combination of separated eggs, heavy cream, fruit juice/fruit, and plenty of sugar.  A basic flavoring gel is made and then combined with heavy cream and a meringue of sorts which gives the cream the lightened effect which makes it so pleasurable to enjoy.  The flavor is never overpowering but is very subtle and tasty and lingers on the tongue like a fine wine.  In fact, it is something that one remembers long after their meal and brags to their friends and family about: how wonderful it was!

Today’s mousse is one of the earliest I learned how to make from scratch.  When we were young cooks, most of the restaurants we were employed in kept a powdered mousse mix on the chef—usually chocolate and lemon—for use on large banquets.  It was cheap to use but unfortunately tasted like it, but due to the inexperience of most palates was undetectable for what it was.  As time went by, I became disgusted using the dry mixes and learned how to do it from scratch and began to make it fresh for small parties much to their delight.  You will find that this recipe is fairly simple to make and relatively inexpensive.  The praise you will receive from your clientele will more than make up for its cost.  If you’re ready, let’s begin:

LEMON MOUSSE

1. Yield: FOUR large tulip glasses:




Qty.
Measure
Item
Other
The Gel
.75
Cup
Granulated sugar

.25
Cup
Cornstarch

.125
Teaspoon
Kosher salt

.75
Cup
Freshly squeezed lemon juice

The Lemon Mixture
3
Each
Egg yolks

1.5
Teaspoons
Melted butter

1.5
Teaspoons
Brandy

.5
Teaspoon
Lemon zest

.5
Teaspoon
Lemon extract

.25
Teaspoon
Almond extract

2
Tablespoon
Water

The Heavy Cream
1.5
Cups
Heavy cream

3/8
Cup
Powdered sugar

1/8
Cup
Granulated sugar

1.5
Teaspoons
Vanilla extract

.5
Teaspoon
Lemon extract

.5
Teaspoon
Orange extract

The Egg Whites
3
Each
Egg whites

.25
Teaspoon
Cream of tartar

.5
Cup
Granulated sugar

The Finish
2.25
Teaspoons
Graham cracker crumbs

1.5
Teaspoons
Granulated sugar

1
Tablespoon
Melted butter

4
Sprigs
Fresh mint leaves




Method:

1.      Prepare the GEL first and note that it’s best to do everything on the day you plan to serve the dessert!  Combine the ingredients listed underneath the “Gel” together and strain through a fine-meshed sieve into the top of a double-boiler.  Make sure you spray the sides of the bowl with PAM or some such other food release spray so that the gel won’t stick to the sides.  Cook it until it’s thickened considerably and then set it aside.

2.      Combine the ingredients listed under the “lemon mixture” and blend well; set aside for the moment.

3.      Begin beating the heavy cream on an electric mixer using a whip attachment and when semi-thick peaks begin to form, begin scaling in the sugars followed by the flavorings. When the cream has thickened, remove it from the mixing bowl and immediately refrigerate.

4.      Clean the mixing bowl and whip thoroughly and when they’re completely clean and dry, begin beating the egg whites.  When they begin to look like meringue, beat in the remaining ingredients listed under the “egg whites.” When combined, set aside and chill.

5.      Place the “lemon mixture” atop the bain-marie over moderately boiling water and cook until it’s thickened up.  Stir in 2 tablespoons of the lemon gel and cook a few moments until combined; then stir in the rest of the gel and cook until its SET-UP.  Remove this mixture from the heat and allow it to chill down for several minutes.

6.      Next, stir the cool lemon gel-egg yolk mixture into the whipped cream and blend together well using a clean mixing bowl and whip.  Finally, fold in the egg white mixture and when it’s combined, CHILL!  

7.      The finished product should be creamy with yellow fragments of gel accenting it here and there as if it were sedimentary breccia. It should be creamy smooth and tasty, a mild but delicious lemony flavor.

8.      Place this mixture into a pastry bag equipped with a star tip and pump it into the chilled glasses in an up-and-down undulating motion ending with a twist at the top. If desired, pump some straight whipped cream atop this. 

9.      Combine the ingredients listed under the “Finish” with the exception of the mint in a small bowl and blend well together.  Sprinkle this atop each of the glasses and then finish with a sprig of mint atop each. Chill for about an hour or two and then serve. Place the glasses atop doilies on chilled bread-and-butter plates and present at the table.

This is a wonderful recipe that makes a luscious dessert that people will swoon over. It can be altered to adapt to other fruits so that this recipe can be used in multiple ways with as much as imagination as you’re gifted with.  Generally, any citrus product can be substituted for the lemon which will allow you to make anything from orange to lime, and from tangerine to even grapefruit! The stranger the fruit, the more wonderful it will be.  Remember, cream, sugar, and eggs are wonderful products in any dessert!

Well, that’s it for today, friends, I will be back tomorrow for some more exciting recipes so until then, have a great day! Bye!

Thanks, my friends!

Gervais

Gervais Krinkelmeier
ACF, CEC, American Bakers’ Association, the Bread Bakers’ Guild of America, Professional Chef and Baker for 45 years.


---30---

END Commentary for Thursday, June 09, 2011 by Gervais Krinkelmeier.

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Gervais Krinkelmeier.

Krinkelmeier, Gervais. “Lemon Mousse.” Recipe developed on July 17, 1987.  

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This is #1261, a 16” x 20" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, "Cambria Shore." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

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      This is a shot of Brian Carrick on 11-05-1976 somewhere in the Sequoia National Forest.  The Magnolia Hilltop Brewers used to perform in the wild places of Kern County throughout the 1970's and passed through this area a great deal. 
   This is a shot of Brian Carrick on the drums and Randall Kyles on lead guitar on 08-27-1976. This photo was taken at Shamrock in the height of Bakersfield summer so shirts off was the norm. 

     This is a shot of Stinkbug's mother on 04-23-1977 at a gig somewhere in Bakersfield, California. 


            This is a shot of bassist Victor Gaona on 12-03-1976 at a gig in either Delano or McFarland, California.  Vic was the MHB's bassist from day one, beginning in 1970. He was a top-notch musician and vocalist. 

This is a shot of Victor Gaona and lead guitarist Jimmy Hall on 05-28-1977 at a gig somewhere in Bakersfield, California, either tearing down or setting up the gear for the evening. 

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