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Tuesday, May 31, 2011

“Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. XVI”


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                                                   STINKBUG 2011




                                                                   

Stinkbug

END Commentary 06-01-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,142.

CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Wednesday, June 01, 2011 by Chef Kilgore Randalini

KITCHEN NOBILITY—THE SAUCIER, PT. XVI

Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. XVI

Bakersfield, CA, 06-01-2011 W:  Once again, sauces are the topic for today as we move on with our Sixteenth Installment of this popular series.  As we’ve discussed many times previously, sauces are the “make or break” item of any professional kitchen that either establishes an up-and-comer or relegates one to cooking breakfast, lunch, and dinner on the graveyard shift.  I know that when I first had an opportunity to learn how to make sauces, I was somewhat petrified when the chef slapped my hand every time I made a mistake or said something dumb.  It is difficult to learn the ropes when one is terrified of their boss but that is how it is in most professional kitchens today.   A chef has to maintain discipline amongst the ranks as the young cooks think they know it all just because they watch Reality TV and quickly jot down all of the recipes they see these dumb-ass TV cooks preparing.  In fact, I have something to say about this very fact!

Being a chef is about being a professional and looking and dressing the part not to mention acting it.  It’s all about joining an organization like the American Culinary Federation and climbing the ranks as one trains, studies, and lives each and every level.  To become an Executive or Master Chef takes many years of practice, sweat, and tears as it’s a difficult process that one has to commit wholeheartedly to.  The cooks on TV are just the opposite; they’re characters who have gimmicks, which get into the televised kitchens and swear up a storm and throw fits for the benefit of the audience.  They certainly don’t give the profession a very good image acting like assholes and being show-offs. It makes the young cooks in today’s kitchens feel inadequate if they’re not saying the “f-bomb” every other word to get their point across. It’s about team work, not being a prima donna idiot who thinks that being covered in tats and wearing a bandana in the kitchen is cool.  The great French chef, Auguste Escoffier would be aghast at the number of show-off, foul-mouthed fools there are in business today.  To me, it’s pitiful, it’s an insult, and it’s sad to watch any of these television shows today.  I have worked around the modern cooks in the past decade and it was a frustrating experience.

I think all of these television personalities would better serve the public if they actually instilled the pride and honor that once was associated with the profession.  Sure, we drink a lot but alcohol and food go together like a man goes together with a woman.  As long as the job is well-done and no one gets injured, there’s nothing wrong with enjoying a cold beverage while on the hot cook’s line.  Just don’t take it to excess and you have the room to achieve success that many will envy.  Try to take the young cooks and instill the history of the profession within their shallow brains and maybe they, too, will come to love and to promote this wonderful profession.  This is a profession that is worth persevering and promoting and taking to the next level and NOT turning into a televised freak show with all sorts of goofballs, boneheads, and foul-mouthed dunces running around like they’re REALLY talented. You know what I say? “F-‘em!”

Let’s get on with our sauces for today: more salsas and assorted tasty things with which to stimulate the taste buds and tantalize your diners!  We continue on with our Stir Fry sauces and then plunge into more Asian-flavored sauces before hitting some very unique salsas.  So, if you’re ready, let us begin!

Stir-fry, smir-fry, there are loads of oriental sauces that we use for sautéing fish and shellfish that we put on our “pupus” (Hawaiian for finger food) platters which in fact, is almost everything. Stir fry sauce varies from teriyaki in its flavoring base as you soon shall see:

(#367) STIR-FRY SAUCE #2

Yield:       about 7-1/2 c           about     15     cups____

About 5 minutes:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
2
Cups
Hoisin sauce
4
Cups
Shoyu
.25
Cup
Nuac pham (Vietnamese fish sauce)
1
Cup
Thai chili sauce

Method:

     1. Heat everything together over high flame and then, remove and chill for use on the line.

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(#368) SOUTHEAST ASIAN MARINADE

Yield:     about 2 cups______

About 20 minutes:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
7
Each
Thai bird chilis, minced
6
Cloves
Garlic, minced
4
Stalks
Lemongrass, trimmed, peeled, and the heart minced fine
.5
Cup
Minced scallions
1
Cup
Nuac Pham fish sauce
.5
Cup
Lime juice
2
Ounces
Brown sugar

Method:

     1. Combine everything in a sauce pot and place over medium high flame. When it hits a high simmer, keep it there for 4-5 minutes and then pull off of the stove. Allow cooling and then beginning using as a marinade for seafood or chicken or tighten it up with a little lie or high heat for a sauce.

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     I know that there are those of you who think that tamarind, Tamarind is an item that is big in the Asian scheme of cooking and is getting re-introduced to American diners as it’s the “in” thing once more. Personally, I don’t care for the shit, it’s a pain-in-the-ass to cook and the flavors of date-apricot i just don’t see... when I lived on Maui, the Filipinos used to suck the raw pulp right out of the pods. Ycch... (But my chef, he’s fascinated with this stuff so what can I do?)

(#369) TAMARIND-MANGO SAUCE

Yield:        about 4 cups _

About: 1 hours, possibly plus:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
1
#
Tamarind (block or paste form)
1
Large
Tomato, chopped
1
Large
Yellow onion, chopped
3
Cloves
Garlic, minced
3
Cups
Orange juice
8
Ounces
Brown sugar
2
Each
Mangos, peeled and diced fine
2
Each
Red bell pepper, seeded, stemmed, de-ribbed, diced ¼”

Method:

     1. Combine all ingreds in a large pot and then cover with a lid. Cook over a medium flame, checking occasionally so you don’t run out of liquid.

     2. Now the ideal state for this to end up is as a sort of a sauce that you can squirt out onto entrees from a plastic bottle, BUT IT MUST BE REFRIGERATED. Continue to stir it around until it looks like hot mud.

     3. Then, force it through a meat grinder with the smallest ring attachment along with a little water if need be. If it seems to want to separate, return to stove, stir constantly over medium-high heat and add a little bit of lie to complete the job.

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     The oriental people Im sure are the ones who truly taught the American people the finesse of the BBQ pit. Yeah, I know there are a bunch of you who are going to jump on the talents of the American frontier’s men which are fine and dandy but show me what sauces they made:

(#370) THAI BAR-BE-QUE SAUCE

Yield:      about 3     cups__

About:   1 hour:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
 1
Tablespoon
Vegetable oil
.75
Cup
Minced shallots
1
Ounce
Minced ginger
1.5
Teaspoon
Sesame oil
.5
Cup
Orange juice
1.5
Teaspoon
Thai chili sauce
.5
Cup
Hoisin sauce
.5
Cup
Prepared Tamarind-Mango Sauce from preceding recipe
.25
Cup
Shoyu
2
Each
Lemongrass hearts, minced
1.5
Ounce
Brown sugar
.5
Ounce
Nuac Pham Vietnamese fish sauce

Method:

     1. Saute shallots and ginger in VO until shallots are clear and translucent; then, add rest of ingredients and simmer over low flame for 30 minutes. Keep cold using as a sauce for sautés where it will be added to the pan and quickly heated up or as a baste for broiling chicken, pork, or beef dishes.

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     The following is the sauce that SOCC uses for its crab cake appetizer which is, unfortunately for the members, a really poor choice when contrasted with the one I brought from Washington state (#341- Lime Pepper sauce which actually kicks butt over anything else that comes close to it) which though a little bit more costly is well worth the expense.

(#371) GREEN THAI CHILI SAUCE

Yield:       about 1 quart___

About 20 minutes:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
 4
bunches
Cilantro, cleaned
3
Each
Peeled and diced ginger
1.5
Cups
Lime juice
.5
Cup
Shoyu
1
Cup
Rice wine vinegar
.5
Cup
Brown sugar
.25
Cup
Thai chili sauce
2
Cups
Olive oil

Method:

     1. This sauce is kept on the cold station on the line and needs to be shaken every time before it’s used to garnish a plate. We serve our crab cakes on a black triangular plate and this sauce looks like muddy river water festering in front of them. I will say that it has flavor though but I’m sure that whoever came up with this one really intended for it to have been an EMULSIFICATION:

     2. Liquefy the cilantro in an electric blender. At the same time, puree the ginger in a Cuisinart. Add the remaining ingreds along with the ginger (with the exception of the oo) to the mixture in the blender (or do this in batches if you’re making the large recipe).

     3. Then, slowly from the top while the blender is running, begin to drizzle the oil from along the top so that it will gain some volume by the incorporation of air but by the end of the day, it will have separated and will need to be shaken up.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     This one is my ace in a hole. You know how the Chinese always have that red sauce for their pineapple sticks the same way the Hawaiians have one that they use for their luaus? Here it is, I made it myself because I am the greatest!

(#372) CHINESE-HAWAIIAN BBQ SAUCE

Yield:  about     3   cups_

About 25 minutes:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
 1.25
Cup
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
1
Cup
Rice wine vinegar
1-1/3
Tablespoon
Shoyu
2
Teaspoons
Kosher salt
.75
Cup
Catsup
Cornstarch slurry

Method:

     1. With the exception of the last ingredient, combine everything together in a sauce pot and bring to medium-high heat. As it begins to boil, begin blend in some corn starch slurry along the sides until it’s as thick as you want it to be.

     2. Keep that temp for 2 minutes, whisking all the while, and then lower temp and allow it to perk over low flame for several minutes. Keep warm or chill. (The trick to Chinese and Hawaiian cookery- it’s in the catsup, both sweet and red...)

(#373) ORANGE SALSA

Yield:     about 5-6 cups:

About 20 minutes:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
 7
Each
Oranges, zested, peeled, and the fruit, diced
1.5
Each
Red onions, peeled and finely diced
1
Tablespoon
Minced garlic
2
Each
Green chilis, seeded and minced (1 for milder salsa)
2
Tablespoons
Lemon juice
3
Tablespoons
Olive oil
3
Tablespoons
Minced cilantro
2
Tablespoons
Gaucho seasoning (Recipe #226)
2
Tablespoons
Granulated sugar OR Splenda

Method:

     Note- these types of salsa’s (fruit and veg) normally last at most a couple of days; that’s why I’m giving you smaller recipes here so you won’t make giant amounts while the homemaker will be able to divide the recipe down to where they want it.

     1. Toss everything together. Label, date, and refrigerate and allow at least 2 hours to pass before serving it but note that it’s so much better if you prep it the night before.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Out of boredom, interesting ideas sometimes spring. Here is one such salsa that combines two completely different items for an interesting mélange of flavors. Use it as a topping for fish:

(#374) AVOCADO-MANGO SALSA

Yield:         about  4 cups:

About 20 minutes:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
 2
Each
Mangos, peeled and diced
2
Each
Avocadoes, peeled and diced
1
Each
Red onion, minced
2
Each
Red chilis, minced and chopped
2
Tablespoons
Lime juice
2
Tablespoons
Red wine vinegar
.25
Cup
Olive oil
.25
Cup
Chopped fresh mint
.25
Cup
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
Gaucho, to taste
Tabasco Sauce, to taste

Method:

     1. Same as in preceding recipe.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(#375) MANGO COULIS

Yield:   2-3 cups:

About 20 minutes:

Quantity
Measurement
Ingredient
 1
Each
Ripe mango, peeled and cubed
1
Each
Ripe mango, pureed
2
Tablespoons
White vinegar
2
Tablespoons
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
.5
Cup
Minced cilantro

Method:

     1. Combine mango puree, vinegar and sgr together in a sauce pan and place over a low flame. When it’s warm, add the cubes and the cilantro. Let it rest on the heat for several minutes before pulling off and then, readjust the flavor to suit you, sweeter or tarter, it’s up to you. Use for fish dishes.

  -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I will be back tomorrow so we can continue on with our sauces, my friends. See you then and have a great day back at work!  As always, thank you for reading the Elemental News of the Day and for enjoying our recipes. We appreciate all of our readers, thank you again!  Remember, each and every Google link or Amazon.com link you click brings in the necessary revenue that allows us to keep our blog up-and-running for your enjoyment each and every day.  Food is always going to be a part of our lives and it is our duty to keep presenting nothing but the best. Tomorrow will be the last installment of this fine series; see you then!

Thank you!

Kilgore Randalini

Kilgore Randalini
Working Chef, ACF.



---30---

END Commentary for Wednesday, June 01, 2011 by Chef Kilgore Randalini

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chef Kilgore Randalini.

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This is #1238, a 20” x 16" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, "Lemons and Birds." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures I

       This is a shot of drummer Brian Carrick of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers at a rehearsal of the band on 08-27-1976 at Shamrock in Bakersfield, California. One of the best drummers in the State of California at the time, he was always in demand as a session drummer. 

  This is a photo of Randall Kyles on 10-21-1976 at a rehearsal of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers at Shamrock in Bakersfield, California. A gifted vocalist, he was one of the best to take the mike. 
This is a shot of bassist Victor Gaona at the mike doing "Train Kept-a-Rollin'" sans his instrument. A powerful vocalist, Vic always put on a show and delivered the goods. 

                                                                Here's another view of Brian Carrick's famed Rodgers Drum Kit on 10-03-1976 at Shamrock. It took 1.5 hours to disassemble and to load the kit to go out on jobs and another 1.5 hours to set it back up and have it ready to go and then a final 1.5 hours at the end of the night to break it all down and to get it back onto the truck for the trip home. 

This is a shot of Groucho on 05-29-1977 outside Shamrock. Brian's cat, she was a busy little critter. 

This is one of Brian Carrick's Cherry Crumbles on 10-01-1987 at the Stockdale Country club in Bakersfield, California. A great dessert-maker, BC only made the best.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   






















                                                                                          

                                                                                  


                                                                          
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