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Monday, May 30, 2011

“Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. XV”


The Youngbloods’ ninth album, “High on a Ridgetop,” was their last studio release as the band separated and decided to go off in different directions.  It came out in 1972 and was a good album, in some ways similar to the previous “Good and Dusty” as it featured some remakes of old classics like “La Bamba” but also had some new material and was quite good.  Jesse Colin Young was always a charming vocalist and Banana and Joe Bauer never failed to deliver the goods either. This is one that all serious collectors need to own in order to appreciate the enjoyment this band offered. Therefore, we recommend this one wholeheartedly and suggest that you rush to Amazon.com and buy it NOW!  Thanks, the Elemental News of the Day.

                                                                                

Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 571 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!



                                                                                   



                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                                 


Stinkbug

END Commentary 05-31-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,142.

CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Tuesday, May 31, 2011 by Chef Kilgore Randalini

KITCHEN NOBILITY—THE SAUCIER, PT. XV

Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. XV

Bakersfield, CA, 05-31-2011 T:  Here we are again, to continue on with more sauces as we slowly come to the end of this series.  No, don’t get me wrong, we have at least another 3-5 days of sauces to cover (or so I suspect) and each and every one of them will be just as enjoyable as the ones that have appeared previously in this series.  The French gave us most of our classic, original sauces but the Orientals have also given us many fine sauces, too, just as have our South American brethren.  Salsas have become very popular and nowadays, you can find a wide variety of different fruits as bases for them instead of the old standby, the tomato.  Nectarines, plums, virtually everything that grows on plant or bush can be found serving as the basis for a tasty formulation.  We will be looking at some of them as we proceed.

Yesterday was Memorial Day and I do hope it was a lovely day for you and that you spent some time reflecting on the great things the American military has done not only for our nation in times of crisis but also for the world whenever it’s needed us.  It’s a shame that a certain segment of our society and of the world sees this nation as the oppressor when in fact, it’s been the great liberator of much of the world including a great many Muslims.  Sadly, it seems fashionable to attack the institutions of this fine nation in order to further one’s career and God knows what the children are being told in grammar, junior high, and high schools.  It’s bad enough that bastions of higher learning have professors who openly bash the country all things that aren’t liberal which is a crying shame.  There’s room for all points of view and ideas of all sorts and yet, yet, they tear down the good things whilst expounding on the bad.  At some point, it’s important for all of us to come together as Americans and to solve the nation’s problems.  We are all on the same ride together and if we don’t work together, we will lose together.

Our sauces for today are quite interesting and let’s take a quick look at them before we go into each and every one: first, we begin with the multitude of salsas I have already mentioned and then we delve into the oriental sauces before concluding for today.  From there, we will continue tomorrow with more of the same until at some point, we come to our inevitable conclusion.  We have concluded with most of our sauces but there’s always the possibility something might pop up along the way. Pasta sauces with meat or seafood will be in the pasta section. But, we are not done here yet, we have the world of SALSA’S AND SIMILAR SUCH FLAVORINGS, TOPPINGS, AND DELIGHTS TO CONTEND WITH, SO PREPARE YOURSELVES!

     The following recipe was the house salsa we used to make every Friday for the weekend which always got consumed by the old-timers:

(#358) BASIC SALSA

Yield:    about  4 cups_______

About 30 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
3
Cups
Peeled, seeded, and diced tomatoes with juice
.5
Cup
Roasted, peeled, seeded, and finely-minced yellow chilis
.5
Cup
Minced cilantro
1
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
1
Teaspoon
Minced garlic
.25
Teaspoon
Ground cumin
.75
Teaspoon
White vinegar
.5
Teaspoon
Oregano
.5
Teaspoon
Black pepper

     1. Mix everything together and refrigerate. The power will build...

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     The next recipe is for salsa being prepared for large batches (institutional, banquets, etc):

(#359) HOUSE SALSA

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
#10 can
Diced tomatoes
1
Bunch
Cilantro, chopped
1
29-ounce can
Diced Ortega chilis
1
Cup
Finely-diced yellow onions
1-1/3
Tablespoon
Kosher salt
2
Teaspoons
Black pepper
2-2/3
Tablespoons
Minced garlic
.25
Cup
White vinegar
2
Tablespoons
Whole oregano

Method:

     1. Run tomatoes and cilantro through a meat grinder with the large circular bit in place. Combine everything together and let the flavor build for a couple of days; then, WATCH OUT!

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(#360) FRESH TOMATO SALSA

Yield:         1-1/2  c________

About 20 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.25
Cups
Diced roma tomatoes (3/16 cut)
.25
Cup
Diced red onions (1/4” cut)
.25
Bunch
Cilantro, chopped
.75
Teaspoon
Diced jalapenos (1/8” cut)
1.5
Teaspoons
Minced garlic
2
Tablespoons
Lime juice
1.5
Teaspoons
Kosher salt
.25
Cup
Olive oil

       

    1. Mix all ingreds together. Label, date, and refrigerate.

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     The next one is the green salsa that’s become so popular over the past 20 years. I tell you, people back then didn’t understand the difference between a tomatillo and a green tomato.

Tomatillos are kind of their own thing growing in little husks that have to be removed prior to use.

(#361) TOMATILLO SALSA

Yield:     2    cups ____________

About 30 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
#
Husked tomatillos; cook them on a griddle until partially cooked; Chop them 
.5
Cup
Finely-diced yellow onions
.5
Bunch
Cilantro, chopped
1.5
Teaspoons
Ground cumin
1
Tablespoon
Kosher salt
3/8
Cup
Fresh lime juice
3/8
Cup
Peanut oil

     1. Mix all ingredients together; label, dates, and refrigerate. After 2 days, there should be maximum power inside that container.

     The next salsa is one that we served in a variety of ways in Washington State. Usually, it went with Greek-inspired dishes as well as with certain salads. It makes a nice contrast when one is accustomed to only the Latin American varieties:

(#362) GREEK CALAMARI SALSA

Yield:        2      cups___

About 15 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Cup
Diced ¼” fresh roma tomatoes
.25
Cup
Diced 1/8” red onions
.25
Cup
Coarse chopped Kalamata olives
1
Tablespoon
Chopped fresh basil leaves
.25
Teaspoon
Minced garlic
1
Pinch
Black pepper
1.5
Teaspoons
Balsamic vinegar
.75
Teaspoon
Lemon juice
.25
Cup
Crumbled feta cheese

     1. Combine all ingreds mixing together well. Label, date and refrigerate.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(#363) NECTARINE OR PLUM SALSA

Yield:       about  4 cups:

About 20 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
12
Each
Plums or nectarines, sliced thin
3
Cups
Rice wine vinegar
1
Each
Red onion, minced
1
Cup
Julienned fresh ginger
2
Tablespoons
Kosher salt
1
Tablespoon
Crushed red chili flakes
1
Bunch
Cilantro, chopped

     1. Toss all ingredients together. Note that this mixture will last for only two days so don’t make any more than what you need. Use as a topping for fish, about 2 ounces per order.

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     The next topping is one that’s always nice for in the summer when you have the freshest fruits available:

(#364) THREE-MELON SALSA

About:        3       cups___

About 20 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.5
Medium
Honeydew, peeled and diced 1/8”
.25
Medium
Seedless watermelon, peeled and diced 1/8”
.5
Medium
Cantaloupe, peeled and diced 1/8”
.5
Bunch
Cilantro, minced fine
.5
Large
Red bell pepper, seeded, cored, de-ribbed and diced 1/8”
.5
Each
Large red onion, diced 1/8”
1.5
Teaspoons
Ground cumin
1.5
Teaspoons
Kosher salt
.25
Cup
Lime juice
1.5
Teaspoons
Sambal Oleck
.125
Cup
Apple cider vinegar
1.5
Teaspoons
Granulated sugar OR Splenda

Method:

     1. Cut fruit and vegetables, place in a bowl and combine with the rest of the ingredients. If using it today, at least allow it to sit for 2 hours so that it develops maximum power or better yet, let it sit in the fridge until the next day when it will really be tasting out-of-this-world!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Here is the recipe for the Great Pacific Northwest’s sweet’n’sour which is pretty good:

(#365) NORTHWEST SWEET’n’SOUR SAUCE

Yield: about 4-1/2  quarts___

About 1 hour:

Qty.
Measure
Item
2.5
Quarts
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
.75
Cup
Catsup
3
Tablespoons
Shoyu
1-1/3
Tablespoons
Sesame oil
1-1/3
Tablespoons
Minced ginger
3/8
Teaspoon
Red chili flakes
2.25
Cups
White vinegar
.75
Cup
Clear gel or cornstarch
1.125
Quarts
Water

Method:

     1. Combine everything together in a large pot (or in restaurant-sized kettle) except for the last two ingredients; bring swiftly to a boil. In the meantime, combine the thickener with the water and then gradually begin to whisk it in until a smooth sauce has been created.

     2. Turn to low heat (125 F in a kettle) and simmer for 20 minutes. Then, after that, use or chill.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Stir-fry sauce is always an essential in any kitchen and this one is a good one:

(#366) STIR FRY SAUCE #1

Yield:      about   3   cups

About 30 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Cup
Shoyu
.5
Cup
Pineapple juice
.75
Cup
Water
.25
Ounce
Ground ginger

     1. Combine the above in a large pot or in a steam kettle.

Bring to a full rolling boil. Then, add the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.5
Cup
Granulated sugar OR Splenda

     2. Return to a boil. Combine together the following and then whisk into the boiling mixture:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.75
Ounce
Clear gel OR Cornstarch
3
Tablespoons
Water

     3. Return to and keep at a final boil of 1 minute and then shut off. Stir in the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.125
Cup
Sake

4. Allow sauce to cool down. It is now ready to use or to store. If storing inside your fridge is what you have in mind, bring the temp down to below 45 F as quickly as possible.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

I will be back tomorrow so we can continue on with our sauces, my friends. See you then and have a great day back at work!  As always, thank you for reading the Elemental News of the Day and for enjoying our recipes. We appreciate all of our readers, thank you again!  

Thank you!

Kilgore Randalini

Kilgore Randalini
Working Chef, ACF.



---30---

END Commentary for Tuesday, May 31, 2011 by Chef Kilgore Randalini

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chef Kilgore Randalini.

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          THE STINKSTER

                                                                                     

                                                                                 
This is #1237, a 36” x 24" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, "Picnic with Jack." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures I

                                                              Chef Stinkbug


      This is a photo of the great drummer of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers behind his kit on 08-21-1976 in fine form. 
                                                                                                                                                   

 This is a shot of lead guitarist and vocalist Randall Kyles on 10-19-1976 at a rehearsal of the MHB at Shamrock in Bakersfield, California. One of the best guitarists in Bakersfield at the time, he always managed to display his showmanship.

This is a shot of drummer Brian Carrick and guitarist Randall Kyles on 08-21-1976 at another rehearsal of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers at Shamrock in Bakersfield, California. Summertime's hot in the Central Valley of the state so shirts come off. 

                                                                                                                                      
This is a shot of MHB bassist, Victor Gaona, relaxing with a beer on 09-12-1976 at 3 A.M. in the morning after a gig. The band always had a few celebratory beers upon arrival home.

                                                                 

This is a shot of Brian Carrick's famed Rodgers' Drum Kit on 10-01-1976 at Shamrock, the band's base of operations in Bakersfield, California. He had the best kit in all of Bakersfield at the time and was a powerful drummer who could go on for hours without stopping.

This is another shot of Brian Carrick's famed Cherry Cake at the Stockdale Country Club on 10-01-1986 in Bakersfield, California. This was one tasty dessert.

                                                                                                                                                          
 This is a cherry crisp on 11-12-1986 at the Stockdale Country Club made by the great chef Brian Carrick.


















                                                                                   

                                                                         
Magnolia Hilltop Brewers and What's Cookin' Productions Trademark of Quality and Symbol of Integrity. Copyright 04-26-2011, all rights reserved. No unauthorized reproductions of any of this material are permissible unless granted by written permission. Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.


















                                                                         


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