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Sunday, May 29, 2011

“Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. XIV”

The Youngbloods’ eighth album, “Sunlight,” was another compilation album that featured all of the band’s hits to date and is a relatively good one.  This band was such an underrated one that we feel a need to promote them as they are worthy of being in anyone’s collection of 1960’s-early 1970’s music.  It’s all here: “Get Together,” “Sunlight,” and many more.  Therefore, we recommend this one wholeheartedly and suggest that you rush to Amazon.com and buy it NOW!  Thanks, the Elemental News of the Day.




                                                                            

Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 572 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!


                                                                                  




                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                                    


Stinkbug

END Commentary 05-30-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,728.

CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Monday, May 30, 2011 by Chef Kilgore Randalini

KITCHEN NOBILITY—THE SAUCIER, PT. XIV

Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. XIV

Bakersfield, CA, 05-30-2011 M:  Hello, friends, like all the rest of us who have written for the old blog, I am returning to write for this one, too, which is always fun.  Today is Memorial Day, a time to remember all of the patriots who have shed blood so that this nation could continue its course and survive over the course of its relatively short history.  Many an American soldier, sailor, airman, Marine, or Coast Guardsman has paid the ultimate price in defense of this nation or its allies, friends, and neighbors.  This is a day that all of us should observe by flying the American flag, visiting the cemeteries and leaving remembrances or by serving the wider community around us rather than jumping into the car and driving around intoxicated in search of adventure.  No, there is so much more to this holiday that it’s important to never lose sight of the real meaning rather than fall into the one promoted by beer salespeople, travel destinations, and boob tube advertisers.

Sauces are our topic for today and this will be our Fourteenth Installment in the series which is pretty impressive.  Whenever we have a series, they sometimes go on forever and this one is no different than any of the other ones.  Our desire is to instruct the reader on the secrets of the professional kitchen so that he or she can duplicate them at home and serve family and friends the types of things we serve in our professional establishments. As Charles Smithenstein has been saying and Stinkbug before him, if one knows how to devise a wide variety of different sauces, one can just about find a decent job all over the place.  So many people head for the Knorr-Suisse product on the pantry chef, add water, and exclaim “voila!” They honest-to-God think they’ve created something from scratch when all they’ve really done is to have combined a dry powder with water from the kitchen tap.  “Bah, humbug!” That’s what I say because there is nothing worse than being a “fake” and resorting to manufactured products when one can spend some time and create something unforgettable from the sweat of their brows!

Let’s begin with our sauces for today! As always, we have a fine selection of sauces, mostly devised by Stinkbug over the course of his career and like all the rest, these are very delicious, tasty sauces with which to spice up your foods and amaze your friends, family, and neighbors!  Once more, you will find a wide variety of things from which to choose, oriental sauces to an old classic, Cheese Sauce, which was a standard item of the long-ago past, mainly because it allowed a chef to rid himself of old, moldy cheese.  Back in the early 1970’s and even the late 1960’s when most of us began our apprenticeships, we saw all sorts of things that no longer occur in the modern-day kitchen.  Sure, we saw the old chefs smoking openly over bubbling pots, the ash of their cigarettes dropping off into them and disappearing into the bubbling morass of whatever it was they were making.  Dinosaurs like the Cheese Sauce, were frequent menu items and much-favored by the diners of the era.  Nowadays, most of us would frown upon something like that but the purpose of this blog is to share ALL of our combined knowledge so that you can learn from us.  Believe me, the old maxim is true: what goes around comes around.  At some point in the future, what was done in the past will be reborn by those as yet unborn in the future!

First of all, we begin with Citron Sauce, a tasty thing that is good for seafood, poultry, and veal.  We continue on with other lovely concoctions with which to stimulate your taste buds and excite your palates! Let’s begin!

(#349) CITRON SAUCE

Yield:    about  2  cups _________

About 25 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.5
Tablespoons
Clear gel or cornstarch
.75
Cup
Lemon juice
.75
Cup
Orange juice
.75
Cup
Moscato or other sweet wine
.25
Cup
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
.25
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
1.5
Teaspoons
Lemon zest

Method:

        1. As in preceding recipe, combine everything together in the bowl of an electric mixer and when combined, force it through a sieve into a sauce pot.

        2. Place sauce pot over a medium high flame, stirring occasionally. When it begins to turn clear along the sides of the pot, begin whisking almost constantly until the entire sauce is clear and a kind of orange in color.

        3. Turn heat to low and let it simmer 10 minutes. Remove from the stove and keep warm for use or chill for use later on.

This sauce is good for mild fishes such as halibut or Atlantic salmon.

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     This next sauce was prompted by the wave of “Chicken Gloria” and “Veal Gloria” dishes that were all the rage back in the Eighties. It’s basically a sauce of three fruits blended together.

(#350) SAUCE GLORIA

Yield:    3     cups _

About 30 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
3
Cups
Pureed canned pie apricots with juice
.5
Cup
Orange juice
.5
Cup
Chicken broth
2
Tablespoons
Clear gel or cornstarch
2
Tablespoons
Welch’s grape jelly
1.5
Cups
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
.5
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
.5
Cup
Chablis
2
Tablespoons
Lemon juice

Method:

     1. Follow preceding recipe’s method as far as preparing this one as they’re basically the same.

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(#351) BROWN SUGAR-ORANGE SAUCE

Yield:      2    cups____

About 20 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.5
Cups
Brown sugar
.5
Cup
Butter
1
Cup
Orange juice

Method:

     1. This sauce would be used for items like glazed yams, etc and this is how you do it:

     Place everything in a sauce pot and dissolve together. When everything is combined, tighten it up with a little lie to the desired thickness. Use now as it might break up if refrigerated.

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     The following sauce is one of those great Northwest creations that are unique and different and flavorful for pasta and pizza toppings:

(#352) SMOKED MOZZARELLA SAUCE

Yield:       about  2  c____

About 40 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Cup
Heavy cream
1
Cup
Half’n’half
2
Ounces
Smoked mozzarella cheese, grated
1.5
Teaspoons
Clam base `
1
Tablespoon
White wine
.25
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
.125
Teaspoon
White pepper
.5
Teaspoon
Lemon juice
.25
Teaspoon
Tabasco sauce

Method:

     1. Scald first 2 ingreds in a heavy-bottomed sauce pot over medium-high heat. Then, reduce heat and begin blending in the cheese stirring all the while until the cheese is melted;

     2. Combine the rest of the ingreds in a bowl and mix until well-blended. Then, incorporate some of the cheese sauce into it. Mix until well-blended and then return the mixture to it.

     3. Thicken with:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Ounce
White roux

     Cook another 15 minutes until well-blended and creamy and then strain through a chinois and incorporate the following final ingredient:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.25
#
Finely julienned prosciutto ham

     4. Remove them from the stove and proceed as for all of the other sauces.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(#353) LEMON BUTTER SAUCE

Yield:     1      Quart ______

About  20 minutes:

     1. Scald the following in a heavy-bottomed sauce pot:

Qty.
Measure
Item
3
Cups
Heavy cream
1
Cup
Lemon juice

     2. Make a white roux of the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Ounce
Butter
1
Ounce
All-purpose flour

     3. Combine the two mixtures together over medium flame, stirring until well blended. Then, stir in the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.5
Cup
Freshly grated parmesan cheese
.5
Teaspoon
Tabasco sauce
1/3
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
3/8
Teaspoon
White pepper

     4. Let the sauce gently simmer and then if you wish, enrich it with a little softened butter right before serving. This sauce is best if made fresh every day.

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(#354) CHEESE SAUCE

Yield:    about  4 cups___________

About  30  minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
2.25
Cups
Water
1.75
Teaspoons
Chicken base
.125
Teaspoon
Nutmeg
3/8
Teaspoon
White pepper
.125
Teaspoon
Tabasco sauce
2.25
Teaspoons
Worcestershire sauce

     1. Bring the above ingreds together in a heavy-bottomed sauce pan to a boil. In another pan, make a white roux:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Cup
All-purpose flour
.75
Cup
Vegetable oil

     2. Blend the following two sets of ingreds using the mixer

method. In the meantime, scald the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
2
Cups
Heavy cream

     3. Add the cream to the mixture in the mixing bowl and combine together well. Then, push the sauce with the aid of a ladle or the push attachment of a meat grinder through a sieve into a heavy duty sauce pot. Place over medium heat.

     4. Now, I should never tell you this but in the industry, we use all of our leftover cheeses, even the skuzzy ones we have to trim the mold off so we can use them. Believe me, we don’t waste anything!

     Anyhow, for the sake of our readers at home, we’re going to do it nicely:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.25
Cup
Grated parmesan cheese
1
Cup
Grated cheddar cheese

     5. Blend the cheese in until melted. Cook over very low flame, stirring occasionally, and then for personality’s sake, add a few drops of egg shade yellow food color so that the customers will really think they’re getting something good. It’s all psychological...

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     Now, this next sauce is one that I ran at SOCC that proved to be very popular. It came to me on a spur of the moment thing because I seldom have those ideas. I’m just an interpreter of other people’s foods and dedicated to do so because for me, to keep the memories alive of the chefs who taught me is extremely important. So, try this one on a fish dish:

(#355) MEXICAN MARDI GRAS SAUCE

Yield:   open

     This is not a recipe with a set formula but one that relies on the talents of the individual cook or chef. The following are the ingreds:

     water, orange, lime, lemon juices with Thai chili sauce, sgr, gaucho, julienned rainbow bell peppers, onions and cilantro. Don’t add the garnish veggies to the sauce until you’re ready to serve it as they will get really mushy; instead, have them blanched and add at the completion of the dish.

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     There are so many different sauces that bear the same name so it’s always hard to keep them categorized, classified, whatever, it makes my poor cook’s brain tired when I do. Any-

how, use the following sauce for chicken or fish:

(#356) ORIENTAL LEMON SAUCE

Yield:       about 4 c____________

About 309 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.75
Cup
Chicken broth
1
Cup
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
1.25
Cups
Lemon juice
3/8
Cup
Rice wine vinegar
3
Inches
Fresh ginger, peeled and minced fine
3
Tablespoons
Clear gel or cornstarch
6
Tablespoons
Water
6
Drops
Yellow food color

Method:

     1. Combine first 5 ingreds together and bring to a boil. Meanwhile combine the cornstarch and water together in a bowl and whisk into the first pot. Whisk rapidly as the sauce forms and then turn it down and let it perk over low flame. Add the food coloring and you’re good to go. As they say in this time period, in place of the word “cool”, it’s “bomb”, man. Twenty years from now, nobody will give a shit what they said at the turn of the century...

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     My present boss thinks that everything is Thai nowadays not realizing that that fad has already passed us by. Oh, well, this is a pretty good sauce but after awhile, enough is enough:

(#357) SWEET & SPICY THAI SAUCE

Yield:       2  cups ______

About 30-40 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.5
Cup
Rice wine vinegar
.5
Cup
Water
1
Cup
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
1
Teaspoon
Thai chili sauce
1
Tablespoon
Minced garlic
1.5
Teaspoons
Nam Pla (Fish Sauce)
Cornstarch slurry

Method:

     1. Combine first 6 ingreds in a pot and bring to a boil. Thicken to desired level with the slurry and after it’s perked

for 20 minutes or so, remove from the flame. Use or chill.



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My friends, we covered a wide gamut of sauces today that I believe you will find to be usable in all your cooking and that’s what we want, things we can use.  Food is about exploration as much as it’s about keeping the past alive so that no one forgets their culinary heritages.  TV is all about reality shows and chefs cursing and making the profession look bad instead of making it something to aspire to. It’s not about being covered in tattoos like some dumb sports figure or being an outrageous prick; no, it’s about pleasing customers, making money, and establishing oneself as an icon of the business like James Beard of Julia Child.  None of these people ran around looking like trash and acting as though they were; no, they were about making the profession respectable and erasing the taint of blue-collar, alcoholic ignorance with which it was always compared.    

Anyhow, tomorrow, we’ll be back and will continue with our Saucier recipes, courtesy of Stinkbug who is the person who fabricated all of these gourmet sauces over his thirty-plus year foodservice career! See you then, my friends!  Ah, it’s so good to be back writing once more!  

Thank you!

Kilgore Randalini

Kilgore Randalini
Working Chef, ACF.



---30---

END Commentary for Monday, May 30, 2011 by Chef Kilgore Randalini

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chef Kilgore Randalini.

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          EL STINKO
                                                                                

                                                                                     
                                                                              
This is #1234, a 16” x 20" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, "West Kern." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures I


 This is Brian Carrick behind his Rodgers Drum Kit on vocals at a rehearsal of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers on 08-20-1976 at Shamrock in Bakersfield, CA.

                                                                                                                                              
 This is a shot of Lupe Carrick, Brian's wife, with her head in bassist Victor Gaona's lap on 05-14-1977 at Shamrock after a gig. What's going on here?

This is a photo of original MHB guitarist Randall Kyles on 10-19-1976 at a rehearsal of the MHB at Shamrock in Bakersfield, Ca, performing for the small audience gathered to hear the band roll out their new songs. 

         This is a photo of Brian Carrick's drum kit on 01-01-1977 at a gig on New Year's Eve morning. This was taken shortly after midnight. 

This is a shot of MHB bassist Victor Gaona on 08-28-1977 at a rehearsal of the band at Shamrock in Bakersfield, CA. Vic was a great musician who also had a set of pipes on him that would impress his listeners. 

This is a photo of Vernon McMahon on 12-31-1976 at our annual New Year's Eve gig somewhere in Kern County, California. This particular photo was taken during the instrumental break during Bachman-Turner Overdrive's "Takin' Care of Business." 

    This is a shot of Brian Carrick's famous fresh cherry cake at the Stockdale Country Club on 01-04-1986.  He was famed for his fantastic desserts and made some of the best cakes and pastries around. 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               





















                                                                             



                                                                              

Magnolia Hilltop Brewers and What's Cookin' Productions Trademark of Quality and Symbol of Integrity. Copyright 04-26-2011, all rights reserved. No unauthorized reproductions of any of this material are permissible unless granted by written permission. Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.



















                                                                               

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