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Saturday, May 28, 2011

“Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. XIII”

The Youngbloods’ seventh album, “Good and Dusty,” saw the band return to “quartet status.” They added Michael Kane on bass so Jesse Colin Young could move to guitar full-time allowing Banana to play both lead guitar and also his Wurlitzer Electric Piano whenever he saw fit.  This album which was released in 1971 saw the band cover a variety of old favorites from their coffee house days plus add a few new tunes to the mix like “Hippie from Olema #5” which was their answer to Merle Haggard’s “Okie from Muskogee.”  We recommend this one wholeheartedly and suggest that you rush to Amazon.com and buy it NOW!  Thanks, the Elemental News of the Day.



                                                                            

Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 573 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!


                                                                                      




                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                           



Stinkbug

END Commentary 05-29-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,802.

CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Sunday, May 29, 2011 by Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein

KITCHEN NOBILITY—THE SAUCIER, PT. XIII

Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. XIII

Bakersfield, CA, 05-29-2011 Su:  Today, we decided that we would get down to business and get cracking in the kitchen as there is still so much to do.  At some point when this series is over, we have decided that we will be doing smaller blog posts, usually on one or two recipes, so you can read them and upload them more quickly.  These long series would go on ad infinitum were we to not package together groups of recipes and present them and whenever we do these things, you, our beloved readers, are ensconced firmly within our minds.  Besides, we must begin planning Stinkbug’s wedding on Halloween, October 31st, 2011, a Monday night here in Bakersfield which will be an event for all to attend.  His lovely bride, the Lovely Lady Linda, will be the most radiant beauty to walk down the aisle and it’s going to be a wild and wooly celebration at the reception, a full-dress costume ball.  All of Bakersfield is going to be on hand for this exciting event and if you are interested, pay attention to his Facebook page for news of the upcoming event.  You will be hearing more and more about it as time goes by and I simply cannot wait.

Sauces, as I mentioned yesterday, make the cook and that, my friends, is the difference between unemployment and a damned good job.  I remember a chef with whom I worked many years ago in a busy truckstop along Highway 99 in Bakersfield, California instructing me on the importance of sauces, an eighteen-year old fry cook who was unimpressed.  However, years later when I had the opportunity to work in some swanky places, I learned that he was correct by watching what went on around me.  The cook who could devise the menus knew his sauces and this was the difference between copying what went on elsewhere in town and being original and creative.  I was impressed, to say the least, and learned from Chef Beauport that what the truckstop chef had told me was the gospel truth.  I saw, I incorporated, I survived and became a chef!  

Once more,  we have a wide variety of sauces with which to regale you and to arouse your creative spark.  Some of them are plain and simple like the Cacciatore Sauce whereas the Champagne Sauces are different, delicate, and unique.  The fact that all of these can be used in a variety of ways is innovative in itself as it calls to your spirit of adventure to enter the kitchen, get out the pots and pans, and get cracking.  I mean, that’s what a kitchen is for; not to be admired from afar but appreciated, loved, and lived-in by every member of the family.  The sooner the kids know how to cook responsibly, the sooner they can begin developing the skills with which to find employment in the world.  There will always be a need for skillful cooks and chefs at every level and the sooner yours are initiated in the fine arts of cookery, the sooner they will become independent.  Like fire, they must be taught to appreciate and to have respect, both for what good it can do and the destruction it can wrought if misused.  That is up to you as the parent and mentor to instill the respect and the desire to them and to yourself.  Come on, let’s get cracking and get into the kitchen and get to work!

Chicken Cacciatore is one of those dishes that everyone enjoys and the key to its success is the sauce. As with many of my recipes, I developed my particular sauce while slaving away in the kitchens of old Stockdale Country Club:

(#340) CACCIATORE SAUCE

Yield:     about  1   Q_

About 1-1/2 hours:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.5
Teaspoons
Olive oil
1
Tablespoon
Minced shallots
1.5
Teaspoons
Minced garlic
1
Cup
Julienned yellow bell peppers (stemmed, seeded, and de-ribbed)
.5
Cup
Julienned red bell peppers (stemmed, seeded, and de-ribbed)
1
Cup
Julienned yellow onions
1.5
Teaspoons
Hungarian paprika
.75
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
.25
Teaspoon
White pepper
1.5
Teaspoons
Whole oregano
1.5
Teaspoons
Whole marjoram
.75
Teaspoon
Sweet basil
.25
Teaspoon
Whole rosemary

1. Sauté the above ingredients in a rondeau until tender. Then, combine with the following hot ingredients:

Qty.
Measure
Item
5/8
Cup
Tomato puree
.5
Cup
Chicken broth
5/8
Cup
Tomato puree
.5
Cup
Chicken broth
3/8
Cup
Catsup
1
Each
Bay leaf
1
Cup
Sliced mushrooms
.5
Cup
Sliced black olives

     2. Bring the mixture to a high simmer and then remove from flame. Keep warm for use or chill below 45 F for use later on.

     There are some chefs who like to brown off their chicken and then combine it with sauce while it’s in the oven. However, I think that dilutes the sauce and renders it less delicious. I like to put my sauce on it right before serving so it keeps all of its strength and flavor.

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     This next sauce is one that really amazed my taste buds when I was living in Washington State. I would recommend this sauce for any establishment that sells crab cakes:

(#341) LIME PEPPER SAUCE

Yield:    2    c_________

About 25 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
20
Ounces
Rose’s lime marmalade
21
Ounces
Thai sweet chili sauce
3/8
Cup
Lime juice
3
Tablespoons
Shoyu

Method:

     1. Combine all ingredients in a sauce pot and heat until marmalade melts. Then, cool to below 45° F and use as a cold condiment for crab cakes or for other delicious seafood dishes.

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     Baked ham (especially moist baked ham) has always been a favorite of mine. When you sauce it with the following, it truly

is out of this world:

(#342) CHAMPAGNE-RAISIN SAUCE

Yield:      about 3-1/2  c _________

About 25 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.5
Cups
Champagne
1.5
Cups
Orange juice
2
Tablespoons
Lemon juice
1
#
Brown sugar
1
Teaspoon
Nutmeg
1.5
Teaspoons
Cinnamon
3
Tablespoons
Clear gel or cornstarch

Method:

     1. Put the clear gel in a mixing bowl and gradually incorporate the liquid into it. When this is done, add everything else and mix together well.

     2. Force this mixture through a chinois into a sauce pan pushing all lumps through. Then, place over medium heat and stir frequently. When you see the clear outer edges forming, begin whisking more.

     3. Allow to hit a boil, keep there 2 minutes then lower heat and simmer 15 minutes or so. Then, pour sauce through a chinois and add the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.5
Cups
Golden and black raisins

Then, either keep warm for service or chill below 45 F as fast as possible. This sauce will last several weeks as all you have to do is to heat it back up.

     The first teriyaki sauce I learned to make was this one. This is what you’d call haoele teriyaki sauce, a good shot at it but nowhere close to the real thing. I didn’t learn what real Teri sauce was until I moved to Maui and got a taste of the real thing (coming up):

(#343) TERIYAKI SAUCE #1

About:    1    Q____

About 30 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Quart
Soy sauce
1.5
Cups
Water
.75
#
Honey
3
Ounces
Brown sugar
.5
Teaspoon
Minced ginger

Method:

     1. Combine everything in a sauce pot and bring to a boil, dissolving both the sgr and the honey. If using as a sauce, tighten it up with a little lie whisked in as it boils to the desired thickness or chill and use as a marinade.

(#344) TERIYAKI SAUCE #2

Yield:      about    3    c_

About 35 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.25
Cups
Soy sauce
5/8
Cup
Pineapple juice
3/8
Cup
Honey
6
Ounces
Brown sugar
3/8
Teaspoon
Ground ginger
1
Each
Bay leaf
3/8
Teaspoon
Minced garlic
.25
Cup
Clear gel or cornstarch

Method:

     1. Combine everything together in a pot. Whisk it well to blend the ingredients. Place over medium-high flame and allow it to hit a boil, whisking all the while. As soon as it does, lower temp to a bare minimum and simmer 20 minutes or so in order to develop maximum flavor.

     2. Then, remove from stove and either use warm or refrigerate for later use.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     I’ve always enjoyed tropical dishes so early on, I was hard-pressed to learn a good recipe for sweet’n’sour sauce. So by the time I left SCC in 1989, I had perfected the following:

(#345) SWEET’N’SOUR SAUCE

Yield:     about 3-1/4  c_____

About an hour:

Qty.
Measure
Item
5/8
Cup
Orange juice
1
Cup
Maraschino cherry juice
2
Cups
Grapefruit juice
2
Cups
Chicken broth
5/8
Cup
Red wine vinegar
.5
#
Brown sugar
.25
Cup
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
3/8
Teaspoon
Ground ginger
.25
Teaspoon
Allspice
.5
Piece
Bay leaf
.25
Cup
Clear gel or cornstarch

Method:

     1. Follow sauce method as per recipe #344. The following are garnitures that are generally associated with sweet’n’sour:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.25
Cups
Quartered green bell peppers (seeded, cored, and de-ribbed)
1.25
Cups
Julienned yellow onions
1.25
Cups
Julienned red bell peppers (seeded, cored, and de-ribbed)
1
Cup
Sliced mushrooms
.5
Cup
Bean sprouts (if recipe includes meat)

Bake covered in sauce @ 350 F 1-1/4 hours for tenderness AFTER poaching the chicken tenders.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Singapore sauce is both a marinade as well as a sauce. All you have to do is to tighten it up with a little lie:

(#346) SINGAPORE SAUCE

Yield:    3     c____

About:  30 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.75
Cup
Shoyu
.75
Cup
Tabasco sauce
.25
Cup
Vegetable oil
.25
Cup
Honey
.5
Teaspoon
Minced ginger
.5
Teaspoon
Minced garlic

Method:

     1. Combine all ingreds in a sauce pan and bring up to a boil; then lower heat and tighten with lie if you so choose or chill it without the starchy thickeners and use as a marinade for 5 # of chicken wings.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Sometimes you forget to make a sauce for that beautiful ham you’ve just baked; well, try this in a hurry and it will pass:

(#347) “MOCK” CHAMPAGNE SAUCE

Yield:    about  2  cups_______

About 10 minutes:

     1. Combine first 5 ingredients in a sauce pan and bring to a boil:

 

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Cup
Beef broth
.5
Cup
White vinegar
.5
Cup
Marsala sherry
.25
Cup
Catsup
.25
Cup
Granulated sugar OR Splenda

     2. Then, tighten the sauce up with lie to desired thickness, pour through a strainer and you’ve got sauce!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     The next sauce goes equally well with poultry as it does with seafood. It, too, has a little bit of the sweet’n’sour effect as well:

(#348) CHAMPAGNE-KIWI SAUCE

Yield:     4   c ____________

About 25-30 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
6
Pieces
Peeled and sliced kiwi fruit
1.5
Cups
Champagne
1.5
Cups
White wine
2
Tablespoons
Lemon juice
2
Tablespoons
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
.5
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
3
Tablespoons
Clear gel or cornstarch

Method:

     1. Prepare kiwi fruit and have ready.

     2. Combine rest of sauce ingredients together in the bowl of an electric mixer and rotate until well-blended. Force the liquid through a sieve along with any clumps of starch or spice.

     3. Bring to a boil whisking almost constantly. Allow it to remain there for 1-2 minutes or until it begins to look clear. At that point, remove it from the stove and blend in the kiwi fruit. Keep this sauce warm but not hot or refrigerate for use later on.

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Well, there you go, a variety of sauces with which to liven up your food.  Show your friends and family that you are an accomplished chef and they will love everything you cook.  Cooking is a talent that nowadays has great rewards whereas once, it was a looked-down upon profession.  It’s taken many years and the American Culinary Federation has been the chief force behind this amazing transformation.  Thank God for their perseverance.  

Tomorrow, we’ll be back and will continue with our Saucier recipes, courtesy of Stinkbug who is the person who fabricated all of these gourmet sauces over his thirty-plus year foodservice career! See you tomorrow!

Thank you!

Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein

The Chuckster
Restaurant Manager, Mixologist, Foodserver



---30---

END Commentary for Sunday, May 29, 2011 by Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chuckster.

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          STINKY
                                                                                    

    
                                                                                                                                                  
This is #1226, an 11” x 14" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, "Party Time." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures I


                                                                 
 This is a shot of Brian Carrick behind his Rodgers' Drum Kit on 05-28-1977.  Looking a little tired, it'd been a long night by the time 1:30 a.m. came around and it was close to time to go home.

This is a photo of Magnolia Hilltop Brewers' bassist Victor Gaona with his head in the lap of Mrs. Brian Carrick, Lupe Carrick, after a long night on 05-14-1977 at Shamrock in Bakersfield, CA. What was going on here? 

This is a photo of MHB guitarist, Randall Kyles, on 10-15-1976 at a rehearsal of the band at Shamrock in Bakersfield, CA. He was the ultimate showman. 

            This is a photo of Mrs. Beverly Carrick, the famed artist, on 04-23-1977 at a gig played by the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers somewhere in Bakersfield, CA. 
This is another photo of bassist Victor Gaona on 08-21-1976 at a gig somewhere in Bakersfield, CA, with the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers. 

            This is a shot of guitarist/vocalist Vernon McMahon at a New Year's Eve gig on 12-31-1976 somewhere in Kern County, California.  A great singer/songwriter, Vernon always fronted the band whenever he performed with us. 

This is another shot of Chef Willy Burton at the Henry the VIII Restaurant in Bakersfield, CA, on 10-03-1976. He was a great chef. 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

























                                                                                 
                                                                           
Magnolia Hilltop Brewers and What's Cookin' Productions Trademark of Quality and Symbol of Integrity. Copyright 04-26-2011, all rights reserved. No unauthorized reproductions of any of this material are permissible unless granted by written permission. Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.


















                                                                             


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