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Friday, May 27, 2011

“Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. XII”

The Youngbloods’ sixth album, “Ride the Wind,” was a live album and by far, one of the best.  The band was in a very jazzy form and the music flowed from start to finish.  As a three-piece, they were truly good and the talent of the musicians is in evidence throughout the CD.  We recommend this one wholeheartedly and suggest that you rush to Amazon.com and buy it NOW!  Thanks, the Elemental News of the Day.



Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 574 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!


                                                                          


                                                                                 

                                                   STINKBUG 2011



                                                                             

Stinkbug

END Commentary 05-28-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,802.

CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Saturday, May 28, 2011 by Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein

KITCHEN NOBILITY—THE SAUCIER, PT. XII

Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. XII

Bakersfield, CA, 05-28-2011 S:  Saturday is a day of rest this week as we recover from our journey around Kern County and our homecoming last night down on Nineteenth Street.  Somewhere along the way, we became separated from one another and I’m not sure where half of my friends ended up.  I guess I will check the telephone messages and see if the police or the sheriff’s called and has some of them in the slammer.  It’s a shame that one cannot drive impaired anymore, I mean when we were all youngsters, our trips around the county and down south to Los Angeles to see concerts was always a drunken frenzy and orgy of sorts.  There were times coming down Kern River Canyon that Vladimir’s Volkswagen was up on two wheels going around curves and if you ask me, we all must be gifted as the Lord kept us from plunging in over the side and disappearing in a ball of fire somewhere at the bottom.  God knows many others have had the misfortune of going over the side and having their cars either explode at rock bottom or being trapped inside and drowning in the raging Kern River.  Our river is very strange, it is a deadly one that in the canyon, sure looks like it while on the flatland, it flows by as placid-looking as a small creek.  Once you go into the river, however, you’re quickly sucked in by the undertow and your brains are bashed out on the submerged rocks.  There are signs all up and down it warning people to stay out and yet, every year, we keep adding to our death toll.

Today, we continue on with our sauce-making which is always fun.  I think Stinkbug has said at his Facebook page that if a cook is knowledgeable about sauces, he can find employment in many a restaurant; this is basically true as its sauces that make the meal and not the meal itself.  I mean, pork is pork and beef is beef.  Fish is fish and chicken is chicken.  How many ways could you cook them either without a variety of spices or sauces? There are just so many ways, right? So you see it’s the sauces and the spices that create variety and variety is what keeps a restaurant open as opposed to closing it. People go out to places where they know there’s going to be something new each and every time.  Many a young chef makes fun of the French cooking of past generations which is a total shame as it’s the French—primarily Chef Auguste Escoffier—who have given the world the foods we have come to know and love.  Therefore, it’s imperative that every cook learns fundamental sauces and baking, too.  Both of these talents have gotten me jobs when others couldn’t.  That is what we’re trying to do here, share education and enlighten the multitudes of readers who want to learn the secrets of cooking.

Today, we are covering a wide variety of sauces: everything from Duxelles to white country gravy and redeye gravy.  I mean, where the hell would one find a variety as varied as this?  Keep these recipes put away in your recipe boxes as you will be using them time and time again.  Food is a marvelous thing and if one can be the judge of what I’m saying—look at all the fricking culinary shows on cable TV! There are more food shows than one can shake the proverbial stick at and that’s saying something! Anyhow, let’s begin and get going with today’s blog:

Duxelles is a topping generally used for fish like snapper, grouper, sea bass and any other fish you want to lend flavor to:

(#333) PORTUGUESE-STYLE DUXELLES

Yield:          about 10 - 11 cups____

About 35 to 45 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Cup
Melted butter
2
Cups
Sliced mushrooms
2
Cups
Seeded, unpeeled, chopped cucumbers
2
Cups
Grated carrots
2
Cups
Artichoke hearts

  

     1. Sauté the above ingreds till tender; then, de-glaze with the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Cup
Marsala sherry

     2. Then, add the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
2
Tablespoons
Minced garlic
2
Teaspoons
Kosher salt
1
Teaspoon
Black pepper
1
Teaspoon
Sweet basil
1
Teaspoon
Whole marjoram
1
Cup
Fresh minced parsley
1
Tablespoon
Lemon juice
.5
Teaspoon
Crushed hot chilis

     3. Don’t overcook everything—it should look like an herbal topping. If you’d like to make it a topping with more body, add some clam broth and tighten it with lie.

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     The following recipe is a list of ingredients just like the ones in the old Chef’s Reminder’s books that were popular in the old days. It doesn’t give you quantities, only the list of ingreds leaving it up to you to do the rest:

(#334) SAUCE DUXELLES

            Bay shrimp (fresh if possible)

            Shredded Dungeness crab meat

            Melted butter

            Minced celery

            Minced onions

            Minced bell peppers

            Sliced mushrooms

            Minced pimientos

            Minced garlic

            Thyme

            Oregano or marjoram

            Salt & White Pepper

            White wine

        1. Have shellfish ready in one container.

        2. In a skillet, sauté everything else until tender. Keep warm. When ready to top the fish, heat up some of the liquid along with the shellfish and then top the fish. Finish with a few lemon circles and a sprinkling of freshly minced parsley.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     The next sauce is a delicious one made from the shells of shellfish such as crab, lobster, or shrimp:

(#335) SAUCE NANTUA

Yield:       1-1/2   Q______

About 1-1/4 hours:

     1. In a rondeau, heat the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.5
Cup
Melted butter

     Add to it the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.5
#
Lobster, shrimp, or crab shells; broken

     Sauté the shells in the butter for 10 minutes and then add:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.5
Cup
Minced celery
.25
Cup
Minced yellow onions
.25
Cup
Minced carrots
.25
Cup
Minced leeks

     Continue sautéing for another 30 minutes over medium-low heat.

     2. Strain the shells from this mixture and then transfer them into a sauce pot and cover with cold water:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.5
Quarts
Water
1
Each
Bay leaf

     3. Place over medium-high flame and reduce to the following amounts:

Qty.
Measure
Item
3
Cups
Shellfish broth

     Strain out and discard the shells.

     4. Melt the following in a sauce pot and add:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.25
Cup
Melted butter
2
Teaspoons
Hungarian paprika
1
Tablespoon
Kosher salt
3/8
Teaspoon
White pepper
.5
Teaspoon
Whole thyme
3/8
Cup
All-purpose flour

     5. Combine the following to form a blonde roux. Cook over low flame until that degree is obtained. Then, begin to blend in the contents of the stock pot, slowly, taking your time. Then, add the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Cup
Warm, reduced heavy cream
.25
Cup
Brandy

     6. Incorporate and then allow the sauce to simmer for 25-30 minutes over very low flame. At the end of this time, check for flavor, thickness or thinness and adjust and then pour through a chinois. Enrich with a few scoops of sauté butter (recipe #219).

Note- you can also enrich the flavor by using a few spoonfuls of prepared lobster, shrimp, crab, or clam bases as well if you so desire.

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     I remember when I first started working as a busboy, I never ever in my life had ever tasted horseradish and my first reaction was one of shock and disgust, just like smoking the first cigarette; but after awhile, the flavor kind of grows on you and you become hooked. Now, I wouldn’t have my rare piece of beef any other way!

(#336) HORSERADISH SAUCE

Yield:     about 3-1/2  c ______

About 10 minutes:

1. Combine the following two ingreds in a sauce pot and keep close to a medium-high temperature:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.5
Cups
Milk
1.5
Cups
Hot corned beef stock

  2. Make a white roux out of the next two ingredients and blend in the spices as well:

Qty.
Measure
Item
3
Tablespoons
Melted butter
3/8
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
.25
Teaspoon
White pepper
3.5
Tablespoons
All-purpose flour

   3. Combine stock and liquid following the guidelines outlined in the preceding recipes. Then, add the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
2.25
Teaspoons
Horseradish
3/8
Cup
Chopped pimientos, dried beforehand
3/8
Teaspoon
Freshly minced parsley rinsed and dried

     4. Let sauce simmer 10 minutes and then, remove from flame.

Handle as outlined in other recipes in this chapter.

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     Training to be a chef generally does not allow us to lower our sights but rather to keep them up high... but one never knows where the vagaries of life will take us. Not good enough to run a top-of-the-line in Maui restaurant but fit for a truck-stop, well, you’ll need the next two recipes that’s for sure:

(#337) WHITE COUNTRY GRAVY

Yield:   about 4 cups _______

About 25 minutes:

     1. Combine in a sizzling sauce pot the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
3
Ounces
Raw link or country sausage, chopped
.25
Cup
Vegetable oil

     2. Sauté until the sausage is cooked. Then add:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Teaspoon
Coarse black pepper
.75
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
.5
Cup
All-purpose flour



     2. Turn the above into a roux stirring constantly. Meanwhile, have the following heated on the stove in a Bain Marie:

Qty.
Measure
Item
3
Cups
Hot milk

     3. Begin to scale in the milk whisking frantically so it won’t have any lumps... then, let it simmer for about 30 minutes and it’s good to go.

     The next one I’ve heard about in history books but never saw until I went to SCC. It was a standard of the past, of pioneers and cowboys, trail-blazing the way across the prairie. Every night they’d get out the old black cast-iron skillet and make their gravy in the bacon fat:

(#338) RED-EYE GRAVY

Yield:   about  5  cups ______

About: 25 to 35 minutes:

     1. In a cast iron skillet, cook the following rendering out the grease:

Qty.
Measure
Item
4
Pieces
Raw bacon, chopped

     2. Then, add the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.25
Cup
Vegetable oil
.5
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
.25
Teaspoon
White pepper

     3. The next step is the critical one. Double-sift the next two ingreds together:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Teaspoon
Hungarian paprika
.5
Cup
All-purpose flour

      

      4. Quickly whisk together to form a hot reddish roux. Allow it to cook over low flame, stirring frequently, before adding the following very slowly...

Qty.
Measure
Item
5
Cups
Hot milk

     As you combine the two, whisk constantly, when a smooth sauce has formed, allow it to simmer over low flame for 20 minutes or so, then it’s ready to use. Be sure to use these recipes for the biscuit recipes #58, #59, and #60. These sauces are designed to go with homemade biscuits from scratch as well as that fried chicken and those country fried steaks mentioned preceding these recipes.

     The next sauce is one from the earlier years of our country but is still just as delicious today as it was back then:

(#339) CUMBERLAND SAUCE

Yield:     about    4    c ______

About 30 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.5
Cups
Orange juice
.5
Cup
Lemon juice
1
Cup
Red currant or Welch’s grape jelly
.25
Cup
Tawny Port
1-1/3
Tablespoons
Dijon mustard
.5
Teaspoon
Ground ginger
1
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
.25
Teaspoon
Cayenne pepper
2-2/3
Tablespoons
Clear gel or cornstarch

Method:

     1. Put the clear gel or corn starch at the top of the list and put it in the bowl of an electric mixer. Begin whisking OJ in but just enough to start dissolving it but not enough to cause it to get “lumpy”.

     2. When everything has been added, force it through a chinois or a sieve and into a sauce pot. Place over medium-high heat stirring frequently. When you notice a clear, bubbling edge in the pot, which is the sauce beginning to thicken. From this point out, whisk constantly until the entire sauce has a beautiful clear look. Then, lower heat to bare minimum and allow it to perk awhile. Keep warm or refrigerate depending upon use.

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Well, there you go, a variety of sauces with which to liven up your food.  Show your friends and family that you are an accomplished chef and they will love everything you cook.  Cooking is a talent that nowadays has great rewards whereas once, it was a looked-down upon profession.  It’s taken many years and the American Culinary Federation has been the chief force behind this amazing transformation.  Thank God for their perseverance.  

Tomorrow, we’ll be back and will continue with our Saucier recipes, courtesy of Stinkbug who is the person who fabricated all of these gourmet sauces over his thirty-plus year foodservice career! See you tomorrow!

Thank you!

Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein

The Chuckster
Restaurant Manager, Mixologist, Foodserver



---30---

END Commentary for Saturday, May 28, 2011 by Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chuckster.

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          THE STINKSTER


                                                                                    
                                                                            
This is #1225, a 12” x 16" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, "Autumn Stroll." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures I

                                                                            


Here's another shot of Brian Carrick on the drums on 05-13-1977 with the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers at a gig in Bakersfield, California. One of the best drummers in the county, he began his music career at age 10. 

    This is a shot of axeman, Jimmy Hall, onstage on 05-28-1977 at a gig in Bakersfield, California. He was one of the top guitarists in Bakersfield at the time. 

      This is a shot of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers saying farewell to McFarland, California on 12-18-1976.  From left to right is guitarist Randall Kyles, drummer Brian Carrick, and bassist Victor Gaona. 

This is a shot of guitarist Randall Kyles onstage on 10-15-1976 at a gig somewhere in Kern County, California. 

       This is a photo of MHB bassist Victor Gaona on 08-26-1976 at a rehearsal at Shamrock in Bakersfield, California. Vic was a great bass player, singer, and accomplished keyboardist. 

    This is a shot of Gerry Kleier on guitar (left) and bassist Victor Gaona (right) at Shamrock in Bakersfield, California. Gerry was never an official member of the band but jammed with us on frequent occasions. 

        This is a photo of Chef Willy Burton at the Henry the VIII Restaurant in Bakersfield, CA, on 10-01-1976. An excellent chef, he had a long career in the city.                                                                                                                                                                                                         
                                                                         






















                                                                                

                                                                          

Magnolia Hilltop Brewers and What's Cookin' Productions Trademark of Quality and Symbol of Integrity. Copyright 04-26-2011, all rights reserved. No unauthorized reproductions of any of this material are permissible unless granted by written permission. Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.
































                                                                                 




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