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Wednesday, May 25, 2011

“Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. X”


The Youngbloods’ fourth album, “Rock Festival,” saw the band put out their first live album and it was a very good one although it didn’t break any records or anything like that. The Youngbloods were never a BIG-CHARTING band; they just put out records, went on tours, and had a good time. Jesse Colin Young was always the star and for the time-being was content to continue playing with his band mates, Joe Bauer and Banana.  This album had a great tune: “Faster all the Time,” which has always been one of our much-beloved songs.  So, do us the favor by taking the convenient link to Amazon.com and buy this stellar album; you won’t be disappointed!  Thanks, the Elemental News of the Day.

                                                                          


Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 576 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!


                                                                              




                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                             


Stinkbug

END Commentary 05-26-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,358

CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Thursday, May 26, 2011 by Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein

KITCHEN NOBILITY—THE SAUCIER, PT. X

Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. X

Bakersfield, CA, 05-26-2011 Th:  Hi, friends, we left Glennville today and drove into Woody, which is just around the corner and spent the day there wading in the creeks and streams doing some fishing while drinking lots of beer. Tomorrow, we board the bus and return to Bakersfield and to our lives and we’re all pretty happy to finally be coming home after this long, tiring odyssey.  Life is meant to be enjoyed and one can do that by taking the tour of the area in which they live and if you do, you will see more things than you could ever imagine by just sitting home and watching the boob tube.  It is far better to enter one’s kitchen and get creative than it is watching reality show after reality show on this celebrity chef and that.  I’m tired of people making careers out of slopping food together on television because every bone-headed imbecile in the area wants to do it on the job which is very annoying to professional chefs.  I mean, people talk about Chef Bobby Flay who is nothing more than a glorified dishwasher strutting around like an f---ing peacock!

Anyhow today, we continue on with our sauces seminar and believe me, we have some exciting sauces for your enjoyment! We are going to learn the famous Spanish Sauce that used to be a mainstay of every kitchen throughout the last century until around the late 1990’s when newer, more aggressive chefs bid the old stuff adios.  They didn’t want to cook like their culinary ancestors any longer and so moved to making different things. Virtually everything we have for you here in this seminar hails from the olden days when we used to create all sorts of sauces and then get them to the table where guests gasped with delight.  Sauces were based on old French models which over the years have become less and less used as the young bucks of the modern-day kitchen through them in the trash along with their proponents and enthusiasts.  That’s fine with me, I believe there is a place for each and everything but one should never forget the road they came on, if you get my drift.  That’s why we go to great lengths to publish these recipes because it’s quite possible that none of you have ever heard or seen any of these fine sauces, am I right? Enough small talk, let’s get cracking!

The next sauce is one that’s livelier than the Sauce Veracruz and is usually seen on menus as omelets and as the accompaniment to meat loaf. I like it because it reminds me of dishes from the old days when I was learning to cook, just like chili and bar-be-que sauce, everybody tried to out-do the next guy.

(#321) SPANISH SAUCE

Yield:   about  1  Q______

About 45 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Tablespoon
Olive oil
1
Cup
Julienned yellow onions
1
Cup
Julienned green bell peppers (stemmed, seeded)
.75
Teaspoon
Whole oregano
1.5
Teaspoons
Minced garlic
2
Tablespoons
Hungarian paprika

     1. Sauté the above in the olive oil until tender but don’t overdo it. At the same time, heat to a boil:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Quart
Whole tomatoes crushed by hand with juice
.75
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
.25
Teaspoon
Black pepper
1
Each
Bay leaf
1
Cup
Catsup

     2. When hot, combine the contents of the second pot with that of the first pot. If using, keep warm and if not, chill below 45 F as quickly as possible.

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     The ensuing sauce is one of those timeless classics that is also one where every chef tries to out-do everybody else because it is the sauce of the fabled Huevos Rancheros that either makes the dish or breaks it. This one breaks all of the rest!

(#322) SAUCE RANCHERO

Yield:    approximately 3-1/2 c:

About 25-30 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
3
Cups
Whole tomatoes with juice
6
Tablespoons
Minced cilantro
.5
Cup
Minced onions
3
Tablespoons
Roasted, peeled, stemmed, seeded, and diced yellow chilis
.75
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
.25
Teaspoon
White pepper
1.5
Teaspoons
Minced garlic
1.5
Teaspoons
Whole oregano
1
Teaspoon
Tabasco sauce

Method:

     1. Run the tomatoes through the meat grinder using a medium-holed cutting disk along with the cilantro. Combine everything together and only bring out and keep hot whatever the amount you’re going to use on any given day.

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     The following sauce is definitely one that is used for wild game of any type. All you have to do is to change the type of stock you use to fit the dish. Other than that, it’s a good sauce and not very hard to make:

(#323) MADAGASCAR SAUCE

Yield:      about  2  c_____

About 35 minutes:

     1. Combine the following ingreds in a sauce pot and place over medium heat:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Cup
Chicken stock
1
Cup
Heavy cream

     2. Sauté the following together until the onions is caramelized:

Qty.
Measure
Item
2
Tablespoons
Melted butter
2.25
Teaspoons
Minced yellow onions

Then add the following and combine for a “seasoned” roux:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.5
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
1
Pinch
White pepper
.125
Teaspoon
Minced garlic
3
Tablespoons
All-purpose flour

     3. When you’ve formed a blonde roux, begin combining the liquid with it. Do it slowly so that there aren’t any lumps. When the sauce has formed, bring it up to a boil as fast as possible and keep there for 2-3 minutes whisking almost constantly!

     4. Then lower flame, pour the sauce through a chinois into another pot and return to medium-low heat. Add the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.5
Teaspoons
Dill pickle relish
1.5
Teaspoons
Green peppercorns with juice
1.5
Teaspoons
Freshly minced parsley
1.5
Teaspoons
Minced chives
2.25
Teaspoons
Lemon juice
1-1/3
Tablespoons
Marsala sherry

     5. Allow sauce to simmer for awhile and then readjust seasonings to suit your taste. Then, either keep warm for service or chill below 45 F as fast as possible.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     The next sauce goes exceptionally well with meats like brisket of beef, corned beef, pastrami, and even pork. Heck, it even goes well with some strong-tasting fish so don’t be afraid to work it in wherever you like mustard:

(#324) MUSTARD SAUCE

Yield:       about 3-1/2  c___

About 35 to 45 minutes:

     1. Combine the following in a sauce pot and place over medium heat:

Qty.
Measure
Item
2
Cups
Heavy cream
1
Cup
Chicken broth

     2. In another sauce pot, begin making a “seasoned” blond roux:

Qty.
Measure
Item
3
Tablespoons
Melted butter
1
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
.25
Teaspoon
White pepper
.125
Teaspoon
Minced garlic
.25
Teaspoon
Dry mustard
.25
Cup
All-purpose flour

     Sauté this mixture over low heat, stirring frequently, until you’ve achieved a blond roux. Then, begin to combine the liquid with the roux just like I told you at the beginning of the sauce recipes- use the mixer.

     3. When all combined and returned to the stove, add the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
4
Ounces
Grey Poupon Mustard
.25
Cup
Sherry
1
Teaspoon
Horseradish
.25
Teaspoon
Minced pimientos

     Allow the sauce to simmer awhile longer. If too thick, add cream or stock or if too thin, tighten with lie. Then, keep hot or make cool.

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     St. George’s Sauce is one that we used at SCC for those occasions when we wanted to have a kind garlicky-sweet sauce for a fish dish. You could almost call it oriental in nature:

(#325) ST. GEORGE’S SAUCE

Yield:   about 5 c______

About 25 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Quart
Beef broth
2
Cups
Chicken broth
.25
Cup
White wine

     1. Combine the above 3 ingredients together in a sauce pan and have warm.

     2. Add the spices to the melted butter and stir to dissolve. Then stir in the APF to make a “seasoned” roux. Cook that roux to a blond state and then, begin to scale in the liquid, whisking all the while.

Qty.
Measure
Item
6
Tablespoons
Melted butter
2.25
Teaspoon
Minced garlic
1
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
.125
Teaspoon
Celery salt
.25
Teaspoon
White pepper
.5
Cup
All-purpose flour

     3. Let the sauce simmer for about 15 minutes and then stir in the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
2
Tablespoons
Catsup

     4. Keep hot for use or chill below 45 F for use later on.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Now the next sauce is one of those all-time, robust sauces that really put the spotlight on the meat they’re either cooked in or sauced with. It smacks of nothing but good things and at SCC we really made top rounds and tri-tips tasty and tender after being cooked in this. Surely, do not overlook this one!

(#326) MARCHAND de VIN

Yield:   about 6 cups

About 45 to 50 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
3
Cups
Beef broth
1
Quart
Chicken broth
1
Cup
Burgundy wine
.125
Cup
Lemon juice
.125
Cup
Catsup
2
Cups
Sliced mushrooms
3/8
Cup
Sliced scallions, both green and white parts

     1. Combine the following in a sauce pot and place over medium-high heat. Have ready.

     2. In the mean time, make the seasoned roux. Melt the following in a sauce pan and add to it:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.5
Cup
Melted butter
1.5
Teaspoons
Kosher salt
1
Tablespoon
Minced garlic
.5
Teaspoon
White pepper
.5
Teaspoon
Whole thyme

Swish around to dissolve and then add the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
5/8
Cup
All-purpose flour

    3. Cook this until you have a semi-dark roux. You can do this in the oven if you like but remember to stir it around every now and then.

     4. When the roux is ready, begin combining the liquid with the roux, slowly taking care that you don’t add any lumps. Return to the stove, simmer for about 20 minutes over low heat to develop flavor and then use it anyway you need to.

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Well, I think that will be all for today.  We have to pack up all our gear and collect all of our recyclables so we can get them to the disposal site. It is important to recycle everything my friends except for the love of a good woman.  That is something every man should hold onto just as a woman should hold onto her man.  People live in this time of throw-away relationships which is a terrible shame as in the old days, in the times of our grandparents, they remained married to one another through many years of adversity and their love never dimmed.  It may have cycled up and down due to problems and challenge but it was always there like a beacon guiding ships through the dead of night.

Tomorrow, we’ll be back and will continue with our Saucier recipes, courtesy of Stinkbug who is the person who fabricated all of these gourmet sauces over his thirty-plus year foodservice career! See you tomorrow!

Thank you!

Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein

The Chuckster
Restaurant Manager, Mixologist, Foodserver



---30---

END Commentary for Thursday, May 26, 2011 by Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chuckster.

KEEP READING THE ELEMENTARY NEWS OF THE DAY FOR THE BEST OF CULINARY POLITICS!

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“Stinky” of the Elemental News of the Day for the best of the news, politics, sports, foodservice, hotel and restaurant business, the end times, the end of days, the apocalypse, armageddon, and whatever else happens to pop up!

  
                                                                                       




          EL PESTOSO MALO

                                                                                   
                                                                           
                                                                              
This is #1221, a 16” x 20" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, "Mountain Idyll." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures I

                                                                              

                                                                                 
        This is a shot of Brian Carrick on the drums and Jimmy Hall on lead guitar on 05-13-1977 at a gig here in Bakersfield, CA.

                                                                                                                                   
 this is a shot of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers on 08-28-1976 at home at Shamrock in Bakersfield, California.  From left to right is Victor Gaona (bass and vocals), Randall Kyles (guitar and vocals), and Brian Carrick (drums and vocals).

This is a shot of MHB guitarist Randall Kyles at Foothill High School on 09-17-1976.  One of the best guitarists in the area, he never failed to amaze his listeners with his virtuosity. 

Bassist Victor Gaona on 05-13-1977 at a gig here in Bakersfield, California. One of the best bassists in all of Kern County, Vic was also a fantastic vocalist.

          This is a photo of rhythm guitarist Vernon McMahon who was also our lead vocalist whenever we played gigs with him.  He booked many of our country and western jobs and always knew his Merle Haggard. 

     This is a photo of Debbie Kyles asleep on the couch after a long gig away from Bakersfield on 10-01-1976.  Debbie was one of our main photographers along with Lupe Carrick. 

                                                                   This is a photo of Salad Chef Chepe Reyes at the Stockdale Country Club in 1988.  A masterful chef from El Salvador, Chef Chepe owns several restaurants in Bakersfield, California today. 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

                                     






























































                                                                        





                                                                          
Magnolia Hilltop Brewers and What's Cookin' Productions Trademark of Quality and Symbol of Integrity. Copyright 04-26-2011, all rights reserved. No unauthorized reproductions of any of this material are permissible unless granted by written permission. Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.


















                                                                                  


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