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Monday, May 23, 2011

“Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. VIII”




The Youngbloods’ second album, “Earth Music,” saw the band as the three-piece they would become for the bulk of their career.  A great album, just like their first, it made 1967 the year that it was: love and peace.  Jesse Colin Young’s vocals as always are superb, Banana’s piano and guitar playing (and his singing) are all very good and of course, Joe Bauer’s drumming is innovative and skillful as it ever was. This is a must-have for all serious collectors of the period and one that we personally love!  Please take the convenient link to Amazon.com and buy this stellar album; you won’t be disappointed!  Thanks, the Elemental News of the Day.

Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 578 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!

                                                             

                                                   STINKBUG 2011



                                                                 




Stinkbug
END Commentary 05-24-2011
Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions
Word Count: 2,739.
CULINARY POLITICS

ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES
Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Tuesday, May 24, 2011 by Stinkbug
KITCHEN NOBILITY—THE SAUCIER, PT. VIII
Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. VIII
Bakersfield, CA, 05-24-2011 T:  This is our last day in McFarland and while everyone else has gone out to take in the sights of the city, I have remained behind; my alcoholism is catching up with me.  I am taking a break and hanging around the hotel and let me tell you, once in awhile a person has to be kind to their body and allow it time to catch up; in fact, I am drinking non-alcoholic beers today in an effort to clear up my system.  I went to the sauna and spent several hours in there letting all of the foreign stuff clear itself out of my body.  So far, this vacation has been wonderful and I have enjoyed myself immensely, everywhere we’ve been has been a lot of fun.  Tomorrow, we board the tour bus to Delano and will be there for a couple of days before heading to Glennville and eventually Woody.  That will pretty much be it except for a stop in the national forest and then Oil City on the way home.  I wanted to see Porterville but time won’t permit it so we’ll have to save that one for another day.  Besides, Porterville is not in Kern County but in Kings County, our nearest northern neighbor in conjunction with Tulare County.   
I want to say a few words about Happy Tours if I may: Happy Tours has been essential in the planning of this trip and so far, we have not had a problem getting to everyplace we’ve gone to.  We are able to keep everything to one bus which has been convenient as that means we don’t have to run across bus stations risking heart attacks and strokes in trying to catch our travel arrangements.  We allow ourselves plenty of time between stops which has been indispensable in making this trip successful.  I highly recommend that anyone who might be planning a trip contact Happy Tours and have them make your arrangements—you won’t be sorry.  Also, they have been crucial in keeping the costs down, and even though we make a lot of money from our blog, every nickel saved in today’s world is fundamental in keeping enough cash in the bank.  So, again, I stress: book through Expedia and you won’t be sorry! 
Well, I think yesterday, we were talking about the Hollandaise family of sauces and we are going to make some specialty hollandaise sauces and then, we’ll move on to still more sauces in our Saucier Series. The ones after the hollandaises will be the butter sauces which can be problematic in their manufacture. I will admit: these are particularly difficult and don’t always come out right but all you can do is to keep plugging away and eventually, you will discover the techniques that are right for you; don’t give up!  
(#309) GOURMET HOLLANDAISES
     The first thing obvious when I took over the Waterfront was to develop new and unique sauces. I like making Hollandaises so the first one that I thought would go over well was a pineapple one. This is what happened:
        A) PINEAPPLE HOLLANDAISE: I tried it several times but when I added fresh pineapple to it, it would always break down. The power of the acidity in the pine was too much for the delicate hollandaise to absorb. Yes, hollandaise is an emulsion built upon fat and acid held together but it was too much when i introduced this new element.
     So, I got to thinking... why not cook the pine in a skillet for a few minutes to tenderize it and cook some of the juices out of it. I then commenced to whip up a new hollandaise that I really wanted to run with my opakapaka (pink snapper) that night.
I added the pineapple to it and lo-and-behold, Lord! It worked! The flavor was great!
     The owners brought in somebody to help me, the former chef at Mama’s Steak House at Paia, Lani what’s your last name, I can’t remember. But anyhow, we began working together and having fun (sorry, Kay) and we got even more ambitious. We began roasting the pineapple and that really brought the flavor out. It was a match made in heaven on both accounts. Then, we proceeded from there:
     B) LILIKOI is something native to Hawaii, a berry that’s simply delicious. I remember having Executive Chef Peter Merriman’s Lilikoi mousse at his restaurant named after him. If you go to the Big Island and you make it to Waimea, be sure to stop in.
     We could buy lilikoi juice and what Lani and I would do was to reduce it by half in order to concentrate the flavor and then stir it in to the hollandaise. Another success!
     C) So, the others followed suit. PAPAYA, MANGO, PASSION FRUIT, GUAVA, and KAILUA, all of them fitted right in as long as they were cooked. That’s the magic behind the sauces.
     We were more of a tourist place so we were hot during the summer and slow in the winter time. We always tried to woo the islanders and since Lani came to work with me, we attracted quite a few because she had a reputations at Mama’s on the curve past Paia.
     The Islanders are excited about things that we take for granted on the mainland. To them, blueberries and boysenberries as well as avocadoes and melons in sauces are exciting, new and unique. In order to make hollandaises out of these (with the exception of the avocado which looked more like guacamole), all one had to do was poach the fruits with sugar and make the sauces sweet.
     These sauces always went well with delicate fish such as onaga, opakapaka, Mahi Mahi, aku, and anything else the fishermen brought to us every day. Fresh fish and fresh sauces was what it was all about. Lani would pick the ti leaves everyday that we used under our fish Upcountry while I would get the bougainvillea on the way into work. (More on this later).
     The other thing we’ll get to when we get to the salsa part is all of the unique and exciting salsa’s I created while working there which sprang up at other restaurants like wildfire after the new owners took the Waterfront over. I was discouraged and left to cut meat in a grocery store for a year because Lani went back to her boyfriend and I went back to Kay.
     We need to get back on track here. We have another category of sauces to do before we get into our variety sauces. There is another spin-off sauce from hollandaise which is good if you’re in a jam. That sauce is:
(#310) SAUCE BATARDE
Yield:    about 2 cups                   about 2 quarts__________
About 20 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
2
Tablespoons
Soft butter
3
Tablespoons
All-purpose flour

1. Combine the above ingredients together stirring until they make a smooth paste. Add then in a slow dribble whisking all the while over medium-high flame:

Qty.
Measure
Item
2
Cups
Chicken broth or vegetable broth

2. Whisk the following together:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Each
Egg yolk
2
Tablespoons
Heavy cream

When well mixed, begin adding in small additions the sauce that is on the stove. Don’t rush it or you’ll curdle the eggs. Just do it nice-and-easy. When you’ve a quarter of the sauce in the mixing bowl, begin whisking that mixture back into the pot on the stove. Bring to a boil over medium-high flame and after 10 seconds remove from heat. Add salt and pepper to taste as well as:

Qty.
Measure
Item
2
Tablespoons
Lemon juice

     Blend in slowly. Then, just before serving, add:

Qty.
Measure
Item
3/8
Cup
Softened butter

     The reason this sauce is handy is because the egg yolks and the butter make it appear to be a hollandaise. It’s not a sauce that you would normally run as a starter but is good to fall back on.
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FRENCH BUTTER SAUCES: AU BUERRE BLANC
     The next group of sauces are just as delicate as hollandaise and can be kept warm (emphasis on that) but by no means, hot. These are sauces in which acidic ingredients are combined with wine and other ingredients and then thickened with soft butter. They are rather like emulsions as well but reduced cream is what holds them together and if you cheat like I do, a light sprinkling of flour.
     Primarily, they generally go well with any delicate flavor but at SOCC, we combine an orange one on the sweet side with a boneless chicken breast breaded in a pecan-Panko mixture which hi-lights both. After we look at these, we’ll move on to the assorted sauces:
(#311) BASIC BUERRE BLANC
Yield:  about 2 c _____________
About 15-20 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
4
Ounces
Minced shallots
8
Ounces
White zinfandel
3
Ounces
Lemon juice
3
Ounces
Apple cider vinegar
2
Cups
Reduced heavy cream
1.5
#
Softened butter
Kosher salt and white pepper to taste;
2
Teaspoons
Lemon zest

Method:
     1. Braise shallots in a little oil until tender and slightly opaque. Then, add the next 4 ingredients and bring to a boil.
     2. When it is boiling, lower heat and reduce by about half. If you’re like me, sprinkle in a little bit of APF to give it some added starch.
     3. Then, off of the flame, begin to whisk in the softened butter taking your time between each addition. When the sauce is of a semi-light consistency, stop adding butter. Season tt with salt and white pepper to taste and then strain through a chinois. Stir in the zest for effect.
     The next few butter sauces are spin-offs of the above. The crucial thing about each is that you get them reduced by about half but not all the way as you’ll have nothing to work with. While at first the sauce may not seem thick enough to you, it will become so as it sits.
LEMON BUERRE BLANC:
Yield:      1-1/2 cups     _____
About 15-20 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Cup
Chablis
.5
Teaspoon
Lemon zest
1.5
Teaspoons
Lemon juice
1
Tablespoon
Apple cider vinegar
.25
Teaspoon
Black pepper
1.5
Teaspoons
Softened butter
1.5
Tablespoons
All-purpose flour
.25
Cup
Heavy cream
1
Pinch
Kosher salt

Method:
     1. In a heavy bottom sauce pan, reduce the first 5 ingreds by half. Combine butter and flour to form a roux and blend it in. Add the cream and bring the mixture to a full boil. Then, whisk in soft butter gradually until you have a delicious butter sauce.
Keep warm at 140°F.
     a) A variation on this is PESTO BUERRE BLANC which is built upon lemon buerre blanc. This will not hold together long so it is best done to order, 2 parts buerre blanc to 1 part pesto.
b) CITRUS BUERRE BLANC:


Qty.
Measure
Item
4
Cups
Chablis
.25
Cup
Lemon juice
2
Tablespoons
White vinegar
3
Tablespoons
All-purpose flour
1
#
Unsalted butter
6
Tablespoons
Heavy cream
.25
Cup
Orange juice
2
Each
Lemons, zested
2
Each
Limes, zested
2
Each
Oranges, zested
1
Tablespoon
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
1
Teaspoon
Gaucho seasoning (recipe #226)

Method:
     1. In a heavy-bottomed sauce pan, boil wine, vinegar, juices till reduced by half. Then add sgr, gaucho and zest.
     2. Combine 4-oz of the butter with the flour to make a roux.
     3. Add the boiling liquid slowly to the white roux whisking constantly to avoid any lumps all the while keeping the mixture at medium-high heat.
     4. Add the cream and remove the pot from the stove. Allow it to cool for several minutes and then slowly whisk in the remaining butter. Hold no higher than 140° F.       
(#312) PORT BUERRE ROUGE
     Same as preceding recipe but sub port sherry for the zinfandel.
(#313) LIME BUTTER SAUCE
     Same as recipe 309 but insert lime juice in place of lemju as well as zest.
(#314) ORANGE BUTTER SAUCE
     Same as recipe #309 but use OJ for both juice and vinegar amounts. Use OZ and add sgr if the sauce is not sweet enough. It should be a little bit tangy but not tart and is good when used with fish, chicken, veal, or vegetables.
(#315) CAPER BUTTER SAUCE
     After recipe #309 or recipe #311 is made, blend in capers and juice and use for seafood or shellfish. These are the major ones I concern myself with.
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Well, this is where we’ll leave off for today and we’ll pick it back up tomorrow although I think the Chuckster is going to take over.  This is the longest I have written in quite awhile and I think it’s enough.  Please leave your comments and be sure to click on as many ads as you like as Google is offering all sorts of good stuff.  We like working with Google and respect their choices as they seem to know what people want and deliver it to them.  Without them and you, we could never have made this excellent trip.  Well, I think that will do it for me, I think. Wait, I think I am scheduled to do ONE more installment and then the Chuckster will take over the Saucier Series! Until then, BYE!
Thank you!
Stinky
Stinkbug
American Bakers’ Association, ACF, CWC

---30---
END Commentary for Tuesday, May 24, 2011 by “Stinkbug
Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.
REFERENCES:
This original essay was written by the one-and-only Stinkbug.
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“Stinky” of the Elemental News of the Day for the best of the news, politics, sports, foodservice, hotel and restaurant business, the end times, the end of days, the apocalypse, armageddon, and whatever else happens to pop up!
  
                                                                

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This is #1219, an 11” x 14" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, "Autumn Creek." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!
Web Pictures I

This is a photo of Brian Carrick on the skins on 05-13-1977 at the gig at West High School in Bakersfield, CA. One of the best drummers in all of Kern County, Brian Carrick could pound it out.

This is a photo of Randall Kyles' wife, Debbie Kyles, on 09-13-1976 at Foothill High School before the start of the show. Known as "Baby Cakes," she was the belle of the band and is still one of our much-beloved friends.


Both of these photos were taken of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers at a gig at the Holiday Inn in Bakersfield, CA, on 05-23-1977. Left to right is Jimmy Hall (lead guitar and vocals), Brian Carrick (drums and vocals), Vernon McMahon (rhythm guitar and vocals), and Victor Gaona (bass and vocals). The fifth guy in the top photo is unidentified but was a friend of Vernon's.

This is a photo of original MHB guitarist, Randall Kyles, at the mike on 08-27-1976. One of the best guitarists in Bakersfield, he wrote many of the band's early hits.

This is a photo of MHB bassist, Victor Gaona, on 05-13-1977 at the Holiday Inn in Bakersfield, California. A gifted bass player, he was also a top vocalist in the area and hopefully is still involved in music today.

                                                                   
 This is a photo of the great Chef, Brian Carrick, in action on 12-31-1987 at the Stockdale Country Club in Bakersfield, California.  A skillful culinarian, he was able to saute shrimp and scallops for 1,000 guests.                                                                   
                                                                 
                                                                  
                                                                    
                                                                              













































                                                                                  


                                                                 
Magnolia Hilltop Brewers and What's Cookin' Productions Trademark of Quality and Symbol of Integrity. Copyright 04-26-2011, all rights reserved. No unauthorized reproductions of any of this material are permissible unless granted by written permission. Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.

                                                                               





                                                                                    


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