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Friday, May 20, 2011

“Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. V”



The “Jefferson Starship” CD we are offering today is their twenty-fourth release (2008), “Jefferson’s Tree of Liberty.”  This was the first studio CD in some time and I’m sorry to say, not a very good one.  Still, it features most of the band from both incarnations of the Jefferson Airplane and Jefferson Starship plus some other interesting members like David LaFlamme from It’s a Beautiful Day.  So, be sure to take the convenient link to Amazon.com and buy this excellent album as you won’t be disappointed!  Thanks, the Elemental News of the Day.

Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 581 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!

                                                                    

                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                    



Stinkbug
END Commentary 05-21-2011
Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions
Word Count: 2,112
CULINARY POLITICS

ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES
Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Saturday, May 21, 2011 by Stinkbug
KITCHEN NOBILITY—THE SAUCIER, PT. V
Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. V
Bakersfield, CA, 05-21-2011 S:  Last night, we went to the Blue Cube in Wasco, California, where we proceeded to get drunk for most of the night before we went slumming.  Wasco has grown a great deal over the past several decades and that’s good as once they were a backwater of the county.  Nevertheless, we enjoy this city and this is a fine place to dine and wine and before long, it was closing time and we had to find our way back to our hotel.  Kern County has a great deal of diversity in its different towns and various groups of people have settled this place and that.  Highway 46 runs through this part of this valley and through this fine town but is known for its horrible car crashes which is due to the quality of the road.  It seems that our county in conjunction with the state government in Sacramento can never find the funds with which to repair the road.  People are always getting killed in head-on car crashes farther west and it’s been the past ten years when Santa Barbara County began repairing their side of the highway whilst Kern County’s continues to deteriorate.
When we finished dining at the Blue Cube, we went to some of the bars closer to our hotel rooms and after awhile decided that we should all hit the sack so we could motor into the town of Shafter tomorrow where our good friend, Charlie Fivecoat, is the police chief. Once he was a professor at Bakersfield College but has now gone back to law enforcement so we’re thinking we’re going to tear up Shafter just to show him we still love him.  Chefs and cooks after all are rowdy people by nature and you can bet that Shafter will know we’ve been there.  Besides, they have many fine bars and restaurants and we’ll make sure we hit each and everyone before we make it back to Bakersfield and our homes. But we still have McFarland, Delano, and Glennville/Woody to visit before making it the long way back to Bakersfield!
Anyhow, aren’t we supposed to be working on sauces today? Let us begin and tomorrow, I will let you some know more about our stay here in Argentina! Here we go!
(#287) COULIS DE TOMATES a l’PROVENCALE
     This sauce is one I’m going to let you make to your tastes. I will tell you the ingredients and what to do and the rest is up to you.
     Many times at work, I have leftover pieces of tomatoes that are otherwise discards which I take and turn into something out of nothing. The day-time guys have a lot of tomato insides left over because they use only the outer pieces for their dishes so here is what I do:
     Run the uncooked insides of the tomato portions after you’ve removed the core through a meat grinder and into a pot. Add mingar, minshall, basil, oregano, thyme, marjoram, and chervil. Add water and white wine and then make a bouquet garni consisting of yellow onion, carrot, celery, OZ, saffron threads, whole fennel, and bay leaves tied up in cheese cloth.
     Throw the bouquet garni into the pot along with some sgr, brandy, cognac, and port. Simmer for 2 hours over the lowest of heat until it has thickened. If not enough, use a little paste to tighten it to the degree you want it to be.
(#288) NORTHWEST TOMATO SAUCE
Yield:    1-1/4    Q___________
About 1-1/4 hours:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.25
Cup
Olive oil
.25
Cup
Diced yellow onions
.25
Cup
Diced carrots
1.5
Teaspoon
Minced garlic

1.      Sauté the above items over a gentle flame until onions are translucent. Then, deglaze with following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
2
Tablespoons
Burgundy wine

     2. Then, add the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.25
Cup
Canned diced tomatoes, drained
5/8
Cup
Tomato puree
2
Tablespoons
Sliced green olives
.75
Teaspoon
Crushed red chili flakes
1
Tablespoon
Chopped fresh basil
2
Tablespoons
Balsamic vinegar
2
Tablespoons
Melted butter
.75
Teaspoon
Granulated sugar
2
Teaspoons
Kosher salt
1
Teaspoon
Black pepper

     3. Raise heat to high and keep there for 2 minutes all the while stirring. Then lower the flame to minimum and simmer for 45 minutes.
     4. Remove from flame and either chill below 45 F and refrigerate or hold hot at 145 F. or hotter. Remember, re-heats need to be 165 F in order to be safe.
      This sauce is a multi-purpose sauce.
(#289) MARINARA SAUCE
Yield:       1-1/2  Q______________
About: 1 hour:
     1. Combine the following in a sauce pot and slowly braise the vegetables:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.25
Cup
Olive oil
.75
Cup
Diced yellow onions
.25
Cup
Diced carrots
.5
Cup
Diced celery
.125
Cup
Minced garlic

     2) Then, add the following and de-glaze the pot:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.25
Cup
Burgundy wine

     3) Meanwhile, have the following ingredients simmering in a separate pot. When the veggies are braised and deglazed, combine the two together:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Quart
Tomato puree
1
Quart
Crushed tomatoes
1.25
Cups
Sliced mushrooms
.25
Cup
Chopped fresh basil
.75
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
.25
Teaspoon
Black pepper
.75
Teaspoon
Whole rosemary
1.5
Teaspoon
Whole thyme

      4. Let the sauce come almost to a boil and then, drop it to low flame and simmer for an hour. If not thick enough to suit your needs, add a little bit of paste. Then, cool down below 45 F as fast as possible and refrigerate.
(#290) SAUCE MARINARA NAPOLI
Yield:      about  1 Q_____
About 1 hour:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.5
Teaspoon
Olive oil
2.25
Teaspoons
Minced garlic
14
Ounces
Tomato puree
1.5
Teaspoons
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
2.25
Teaspoons
Freshly minced parsley
.5
Teaspoon
Whole oregano
.75
Teaspoon
 Sweet basil
.75
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
3/8
Teaspoon
Black pepper
5/8
Teaspoon
Whole marjoram
.25
Teaspoon
Nutmeg
2
Each
Anchovies ground into paste;
1.5
Cups
Chicken broth (recipe #206)
1
Cup
Espagnole sauce (recipe #209)
1
Cup
Tomato sauce
.25
Cup
Burgundy wine
Tomato paste, to thicken

Method:
     1. Combine ingredients in a sauce pot and allow to come almost to a boil. It really helps if you have an insulating pad between the fire and the bottom of the pot.
     2. At that point, lower the flame and simmer for about an hour. Double-check seasonings and readjust as necessary. If needed, tighten up with tomato paste. After a few more minutes, remove from the flame and cool down below 45 F as fast as possible.
     The following sauce is a quick one that uses store-bought products. I’m going to leave it in its institutional format because if you’re cooking at home, I expect you to make my products from scratch:
a) INSTITUTIONAL MARINARA SAUCE:
Yield:  about  5  gallons/ about 45 minutes prep time:

Qty.
Measure
Item
4
#10 cans
Bello Orto-brand marinara sauce
4
Tablespoons
Black pepper
8
Tablespoons
Kosher salt
12
Cups
Diced yellow onions
.75
Cup
Freshly minced parsley
1
Cup
Italian seasoning
1.5
Cups
Sauté butter (recipe #219)
.75
Cup
Olive oil

Method:
     1. Heat oo in heavy-bottomed pot, then sauté onions on medium heat till clear, then add remaining ingreds and mix thoroughly. Simmer for 15-20 minutes or until heated through.
     Note: Do not serve the same day it’s made as the herbs need time to work.
     The next sauce is one that hails from the south of France and is generally served in connection with seafood dishes. It also is tasty when combined with chicken stock and used for the braising of whole chicken parts:
(#291) PROVENCAL SAUCE
Yield: 6-8 orders_____________
About 45 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
2
Tablespoons
Olive oil
.75
Cup
Diced celery
.75
Cup
Diced yellow onions
3
Cups
Chopped tomatoes with juice (canned)
.5
Cup
Tomato juice
1
Teaspoon
Minced garlic
1
Teaspoon
Whole oregano
1.5
Teaspoons
Sweet basil
.5
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
.25
Teaspoon
Black pepper
.75
Teaspoon
Whole marjoram
.75
Teaspoon
Whole thyme
1
Each
Bay leaf
1
Tablespoon
Freshly minced parsley
.5
Cup
Sauterne

Method:
     1. Sauté veg in olive oil and vegetables over medium flame until tender. Combine seasonings with tomatoes and add to the pot. Finish off with the wine and simmer over very low flame for 20 minutes.
     2. Remove from stove then and allow to cool. If using this sauce to bake fish in, keep it warm and if using for sauté, keep at room temp adding it only when you need it.
(#292) AMERICAN TOMATO SAUCE
Yield:      about 2 Q___________
About 2 hours:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.75
Cups
Tomato ketchup
5/8
Cup
Tomato puree
1.5
Cups
Diced tomatoes with juice
2
Cups
Chicken broth
3
Tablespoons
Melted butter
.25
Cup
All-purpose flour
1
Each
Bay leaf
1
Tablespoon
Minced garlic
2.25
Teaspoons
Sweet basil
1.5
Teaspoons
Whole oregano
.75
Teaspoon
Whole marjoram
1
Tablespoon
Kosher salt
1.25
Teaspoons
Black pepper
1.5
Teaspoons
Onion powder
1.5
Teaspoons
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
1.5
Teaspoons
Freshly minced parsley
.5
Cup
Grated parmesan cheese

Method:
     1. Combine first 4 ingreds in a pot and bring them up to medium-high heat.
     2. In another pot, combine MB and all seasonings together. Sweat until tender and then add flour and cook, stirring almost constantly, until a tan roux is formed.
     3. Then, gradually work in the hot tomato stock. Do it a little bit at a time or in an electric mixer. Be sure as you add in the stock, you do it slowly so you don’t end up with any lumps.
     4. Place pot over low flame and blend in the cheese. Over low flame, simmer for 1 hour. Then, add the last and final ingredient:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.5
Cup
Marsala wine

     5. Simmer for another 30 minutes and then, remove from stove.
     The next Sauce Tomate is one that Executive Chef Juan Aguirre taught me at SCC. In it, you can see the Mexican influence meaning that it’s a little bit spicier than some of the other versions already mentioned:
(#293) JUAN’S ITALIAN TOMATO SAUCE
Yield:   about 2 Q:_
About 3 hours:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.25
Cup
Olive oil
.75
Cup
Diced yellow onions
.25
Brunch
Fresh parsley, minced
1
Ounce
Minced garlic

1.      Combine above and sauté over low heat until onions are tender and transparent.
2.      Add then the following:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Tablespoon
Sweet basil
1.5
Teaspoons
Whole rosemary
2.25
Teaspoons
Whole oregano
3
Cups
Diced tomatoes run through a meat grinder
.5
Ounce
Chicken base
1
Cup
Tomato juice
1.75
Teaspoons
Worcestershire sauce
3/8
Teaspoon
Tabasco sauce
.5
Cup
Burgundy wine
1.75
Teaspoons
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
2
Cups
Diced tomatoes in juice

3.      Using an insulated pad between the flame and the bottom of the pot, bring the mixture almost to a boil and then lower flame to a barest minimum and allow the sauce to develop flavor over the next 2-1/2 to 3 hours. At the end of this time, re-evaluate the flavor and make compensations as needed and then cool as fast as possible below 45 F.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Well, there you go, my friends, a whole bunch of tomato sauces! Just think, one of the greatest discoveries of the Spaniards in the New World was the TOMATO!  There would be NO pizza, NO spaghetti as we know it, and a whole lot of other wonderful foods like BLT sandwiches. Yes, there is so much we would be left without; I hate to even think about what it would be like! So, think about it—the tomato—and what it means to you, me, and the world! Hell, there would be NO BLOODY MARY cocktails! Ah, well, there you go. Our beloved tomato!
Thank you!
Stinky
Stinkbug
American Bakers’ Association, ACF, CWC

---30---
END Commentary for Saturday, May 21, 2011 by “Stinkbug
Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.
REFERENCES:
This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Stinkbug.
KEEP READING THE ELEMENTARY NEWS OF THE DAY FOR THE BEST OF CULINARY POLITICS!
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“Stinky” of the Elemental News of the Day for the best of the news, politics, sports, foodservice, hotel and restaurant business, the end times, the end of days, the apocalypse, armageddon, and whatever else happens to pop up!
  
                                                            

          STINKO
                                                            
                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
This is #1206, a 12” x 16" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, "GIT!" It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!
Web Pictures I
This is another photo of the grounds at the Miramar Hotel in the 1980's during a vacation taken by Brian Carrick and his family.

This is a shot of Brian Carrick live onstage on 04-23-1977 at one of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers' many gigs in and around Bakersfield and Kern county, California. He was a powerful drummer and could play any form of music.

This is a photo of Brian Carrick's first wife, Guadeloupe Maria Loya Carrick on 01-04-1977 somewhere in Western Kern County while on a road trip with her husband and bassist Victor Gaona.

 This is a photo of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers on 05-13-1977 after a gig. From left to right is Denise, bassist Victor Gaona, Lead guitarist Jimmy Hall, rhythm guitarist Vernon McMahon, and in the front is drummer Brian Carrick.

This is a photo of lead guitarist Randall Kyles on 08-20-1976 at Shamrock during a hand rehearsal by the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers.

This is a photo of bassist Victor Gaona onstage at Maricopa, California on 04-09-1976. Victor was a gifted musician who was trained classically but could rock and roll like no one else.

    This is a photo of one of Brian Carrick's famed Carrot Cakes at the Stockdale Country Club in 1989.                                                        
                                                                     
                                                                   
                                                                
                                                                 
                                                                 
                                                              


























                                                                                 

                                                                                     
Magnolia Hilltop Brewers and What's Cookin' Productions Trademark of Quality and Symbol of Integrity. Copyright 04-26-2011, all rights reserved. No unauthorized reproductions of any of this material are permissible unless granted by written permission. Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.


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