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Tuesday, May 24, 2011

“Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. IX”


The Youngbloods’ third album, “Elephant Mountain,” saw the band release a major antiwar song, “Darkness, Darkness” that rocked the world of AM Radio! This song was powerful and the album was phenomenal and is definitely worth the price of admission. We think it’s among the best albums released in 1969 and one that is ageless. Please take the convenient link to Amazon.com and buy this stellar album; you won’t be disappointed! Thanks, the Elemental News of the Day.


                                                                     


Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 577 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!



                                                                                



                                                   STINKBUG 2011


                                                                           


Stinkbug

END Commentary 05-25-2011

Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions

Word Count: 2,503

CULINARY POLITICS



ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES

Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Wednesday, May 25, 2011 by Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein

KITCHEN NOBILITY—THE SAUCIER, PT. IX

Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. IX

Bakersfield, CA, 05-25-2011 W:  Hi, friends, Stinky was correct yesterday: I am the one doing today’s blog post while he gets to enjoy himself after having done so well over the past week. Also, you have to know that most of the recipes are his; we merely present them to you as my experience is in tending bar and serving food.  The deal is, we all write about what we know or what he gives us to present and then, we take it from there.  He makes everything clear to us and then we take his notes and his personal cookbooks and type up the day’s offerings.  That is what is going to happen this morning, I am going to continue on with his Saucier Series and all I can say is, “It’s going to be fun!”

We motored into Glennville, the town between Lake Isabella and Oil Center this morning and like our drive into Delano, it was comfortable and uneventful.  The country is very beautiful from the bus and the town looked like a glittering jewel as we dropped down from above it.  Once we arrived, we were whisked away to the eatery in Glennville by our good friend, Chef Callahan and like all of other stays, this is a beautiful area and we’re going to enjoy our time here.  We will be in the area fishing for a couple of days and then it will be across the river to Woody and we’ll be there for a couple of days as well.  By the time this trip is over, we will have been in most every town and city of the county, from Lake Isabella, Caliente, Bodfish, Arvin, Monolith, Onyx, Wofford Heights, and Kernville; Inyokern, Ridgecrest, Randsburg, Johannesburg, Edwards, North Edwards, and Rosamond; Tehachapi, Frazier Park, Lake of the Woods, Cuyama, New Cuyama, Maricopa, Taft, and Fellows; McKittrick, Berrenda Mesa, Shafter, Wasco, McFarland, and Delano; and finally Glennville, Woody, and Oil City/Oil Center, and the last three communities on the way to Taft: Dustin Acres, Durban Acres, and one other one whose name I forget!  The only places we won’t make it to are the unincorporated areas in the far west where God knows what goes on or lives there.  There just wasn’t time OR the funds for us to do all of that! But you can’t complain about where we’ve been and what we’ve seen nor the food and drink.  It has cost us a fortune but is well worth it, even though it’s wintertime. 

As soon as we got in, we went to the breakfast buffet and then the women began making plans while most of the guys ended up in the cocktail lounge.  I loaded up on all of the good foods they had available, most of which of I knew, some of which, I had no idea; nonetheless, they were all tasty and accompanied my first bottle of scotch for the day on its way down! I have been tired from the pace of our trip so I went back upstairs and went to bed while the rest of the group went out to take in the sights of the beautiful capital city.  I realize that we’re only going to be here for another couple of days but I wanted to get the blog post written and then pass out for the rest of the afternoon.  We are working on the Saucier Series and I believe we will be diving into a bunch of oriental or otherwise unique sauces so without further adieu, let us commence:

Now, we’re going to get into the realm of varietal sauces, ones that may have or may anything to do with the above. These will include corn starch sauces as well as roux-thickened ones. I will try to keep everything in some semblance of order so please bear with me.

     The first sauce is an important one but does not fit into the Béchamel category but instead stands on its own two legs and is very important to the cooking world.

     At Seven Oaks, we have pasta night every Wednesday and one of our cooks who works on it is always trying to change things. One day, I had to work on a Wednesday so I asked him what I could do to help. He said make the Alfredo Sauce so I said, “Fine, just tell me what you want in it”. He started running off a list of all kinds of things that I didn’t think belonged in there but I said “OK” and went to do it.

     Then, the Executive Sous Chef, Mitch Montalvo, came over to me and said in a low voice, “don’t do that, that’s crazy what he said”. “I told him I thought so but wasn’t going to question it if that’s the way things really are. This is what Mitch told me to do:

(#316) ALFREDO SAUCE

     Whatever amount you want, you start with double the heavy cream. You put it in a steam-jacket or in a pot with a thick bottom. Then, you reduce by half, blend in parmesan cheese (preferably, the freshly grated kind) and season to taste with S & WP and there you go. I said, “Great, that’s what I’ll do” and that was that.

(#317) WHITE WINE HERBAL SAUCE

Yield:    about 4 cups ___________

About 30 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1/3
Cup
Melted butter
1/3
Cup
All-purpose flour
2
Cups
Fish fumet
2
Cups
Half’n’half
1
Cup
French Colombard
.5
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
.25
Teaspoon
White pepper
.125
Teaspoon
Ground bay leaves
.25
Teaspoon
Dill weed
.25
Teaspoon
Whole thyme
.5
Teaspoon
Whole marjoram
.5
Teaspoon
Lemon juice
.25
Teaspoon
Nutmeg

Method:

     1. Combine flour and butter together to form a roux and cook over low heat just until a white roux has formed.

     2. Meanwhile, combine the rest of the ingredients together and place over medium-high heat. As soon as they near a boil, begin whisking the liquid into the roux a bit at a time so that no lumps are formed. Continue adding until all liquid has been added.

     3. Lower heat to low and allow simmering about 20 minutes; then, pouring through a chinois and your sauce is ready to use on fish dishes, croquettes and quenelles.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     The next sauce is one we utilized at SCC quite again, serving it with fish, chicken, or veal:

(#318) SMITANE SAUCE:

Yield: about 1-1/2 quarts________

About 30 minutes:

     1. In one pot, combine the chicken broth, milk, and sour cream; place on a burner and allow it to get to medium-high heat:

Qty.
Measure
Item
2
Cups
Chicken broth
.5
Cup
Milk
1.5
Cups
Sour cream

     2. In another pot, begin cooking the minced onions until somewhat caramelized, sort of translucent:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.25
Cup
Melted butter
.5
Cup
Finely minced white onions
3/8
Cup
All-purpose flour

     3. Sauté the onions in the butter and then, blend in the flour and cook over low heat for 10-15 minutes. Gradually begin pouring the liquid into the roux mixing constantly. When basic sauce has formed, let it perk over low flame. Meanwhile, combine the following together:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
3/8
Teaspoon
White pepper
.25
Cup
Chardonnay

    4. Combine above mixture really well and then blend it into the completed sauce. Cook several minutes longer then remove from stove. Adjust seasonings to taste and either keep warm or refrigerate.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     The next sauce is one we utilized at SCC when we wanted to add a little Mediterranean touch to our specials. This sauce goes very well with fish items especially those from that region such as mackerel or sturgeons:

(#319) ST. PETER’S SAUCE

Yield:   about    1 quart_______

About 25 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
16
Ounces
Canned tomatoes squeezed by hand with juice
1
Cup
Medium-diced eggplant
.75
Cup
V-8 juice

1. Combine first 3 ingreds in a sauce pot and have warm. At the same time, heat the oil in a skillet and when it’s hot, begin sautéing the onions and celery till tender and aromatic.

Qty.
Measure
Item
2
Tablespoons
Olive oil
.5
Cup
Minced red onions
.5
Cup
Minced celery
1
Small
Yellow chili, roasted, peeled, stemmed and seeded; minced

     2. Deglaze with the wine and add the remaining ingredients. Finally, combine with the contents in the first pot and bring to a boil; once there, lower heat and simmer over a low flame. You want it slightly thickened but not too thick. If you’re having a hard time getting the thickness you want, use a little lie.

Qty.
Measure
Item
.25
Cup
Dry white wine
2
Tablespoons
Freshly minced parsley
1
Tablespoon
Worcestershire sauce
2
Teaspoons
Granulated sugar OR Splenda
1
Teaspoon
Sweet basil
.25
Teaspoon
Whole thyme
.25
Teaspoon
Whole oregano

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     The ensuing sauce is one that goes well with seafood and shellfish dishes that have a touch of the border on them; spicy but not too hot but exciting to the palate all the same.

(#320) SAUCE VERACRUZ

Yield: about 1 quart____

About 45 minutes:

Qty.
Measure
Item
1
Tablespoon
Olive oil
1
Cup
Julienned yellow onions
1
Cup
Julienned green bell peppers (stemmed, seeded)
.75
Teaspoon
Whole oregano
2.25
Teaspoon
Minced garlic
1
Tablespoon
Hungarian paprika

     1. Sauté the above ingredients together until vegetables are tender but still retain some of their personality. In the meantime, heat together in another pot:

Qty.
Measure
Item
4
Cups
Whole tomatoes, crushed by hand with juice
.75
Teaspoon
Capers with juice
.5
Teaspoon
Green peppercorns
.75
Teaspoon
Kosher salt
3/8
Teaspoon
White pepper
1
Each
Bay leaf
1
Cup
Catsup
.5
Cup
Port sherry

     2. When hot, combine both pots together. If using right away, keep the sauce warm but if not, chill it below 45°F as swiftly as possible.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Well, I was mistaken about the “oriental” sauces but we instead dived into more European-Mediterranean environs’ sauces that go well with everything from fish to lamb, beef, veal, and chicken.  Hell, here in the mountains, they would go well with goat!  When I visited Hawaii, I noticed in the grocery stores “fresh goat” on the meat counter shelves which I found to be rather interesting. I have not seen that in the rest of the United States so I was interested, bought some, and tried it out and found it to be tasty, to say the least.  In Europe, they eat horse meat without much thought and in fact find it to be flavorful and delicious whereas most Americans would be appalled.  That just goes to prove that people will eat about anything and enjoys it just as all of the variety meats like buffalo, bear, deer, and many other things are very popular now.  I remember the first time I age ostrich meat and found it to be quite good but when I told my mom about my dining experience, she was somewhat shocked and was critical of me for having eaten it. 

So, here in Kern County, all of these things would be considered to be acceptable because in areas of poverty and chronic hunger, sooner or later, everything will begin to look okay.  My tastes are more adventuresome and there isn’t a whole lot I wouldn’t eat but like I said, my Mom has completely different feelings about what goes on her plate.  Ergo, I would not surprise her with porcupine meat or beaver meat without first asking whether or not she would eat it.  She’s my mom—I owe her that respect! But in many of the country clubs and hotels, in which I have served my time, all of these things would have found their way onto the tables of gourmet dining and most wouldn’t have been bothered at all. Ah, well, c’est la vie!

Tomorrow, we’ll be back and will continue with our Saucier recipes, courtesy of Stinkbug who, I think, is sleeping off a hangover today. Poor guy—he didn’t look so well riding the bus in today from McFarland! See you tomorrow!

Thank you!

Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein

The Chuckster
Restaurant Manager, Mixologist, Foodserver



---30---

END Commentary for Wednesday, May 25, 2011 by Charles “the Chuckster” Smithenstein

Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.

REFERENCES:

This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Chuckster.

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          THE SMELLY ONE
                                                                                      

                                                                                    


                                                                              
This is #1220, a 16” x 20" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, "Fourth of July." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!

Web Pictures I



Brian Carrick takes a bow behind the drums on 05-13-1977 at a gig in Bakersfield, California with the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers. One of the best drummers in Bakersfield in the 1970's, he never failed to amaze. 

This is a photo of axeman, Jimmy Hall, at the same gig on 05-13-1977 fronting the MHB band.  A stellar musician, he was one of the greatest guitarists in the area at the time. 

 This is a shot of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers on 08-21-1976 at Shamrock during a rehearsal.  Behind the drums is Brian Carrick while on the left is guitarist, Randall Kyles and on the right is bassist, Victor Gaona. Shamrock was the band's hereditary home base. 

                                                                    This is a photo of guitarist Randall Kyles on 09-17-1976 at a gig at Foothill High School in Bakersfield, California.  A great musician, he was one of the best guitarists I ever had the pleasure of performing with. 

This is a photo of longterm bassist, Victor Gaona, with the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers at a gig on 05-13-1977 in Bakersfield, California.  He was one of the original members of the band and a great friend. 

     This is a shot of guitarist and vocalist, Vernon McMahon at the same gig on 05-13-1977 taking a break from the action.  

This is a photo of Chef Brian Carrick at the Stockdale Country Club's New Year's Eve celebration on 12-31-1986 dishing up sauteed scallops and shrimps on the fresh seafood line.  The Stockdale Country Club is the finest  country club in the entire valley.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       












































                                                                                


                                                                        
Magnolia Hilltop Brewers and What's Cookin' Productions Trademark of Quality and Symbol of Integrity. Copyright 04-26-2011, all rights reserved. No unauthorized reproductions of any of this material are permissible unless granted by written permission. Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day.









                                                                                             







                                                                           



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