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Thursday, May 19, 2011

“Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. IV”



The “Jefferson Starship” CD we are offering today is their twenty-third release (2003), “Deeper Space/Extra Virgin Sky.”  Another live CD, this one was a double CD that featured some of their best material and the band’s standard line-up featuring Paul Kantner, Marty Balin, and Jack Cassady augmented by newer and younger members such as renowned vocalist, Dana Magano. It was a reissue of their “Deep Space/Virgin Sky” CD from 1995 but with a second disk.  So, be sure to take the convenient link to Amazon.com and buy this excellent album as you won’t be disappointed!  Thanks, the Elemental News of the Day.

Here's the countdown to December 21, 2012: from today, we have 582 days to go until the End of Days, the End of Time, Armageddon, and the End of the Mayan Calendar!  Everybody, beware!

                                                                    

                                                   STINKBUG 2011




                                                             



Stinkbug
END Commentary 05-20-2011
Copyright © 2011 by MHB Productions
Word Count: 3,006
CULINARY POLITICS

ELEMENTALNEWSOFTHEDAY.BLOGSPOT.COM-STINKBUG—THE HEADLINES
Elemental News of the Day Commentary-Opinion-Sports-Foodservice for Friday, May 20, 2011 by Stinkbug
KITCHEN NOBILITY—THE SAUCIER, PT. IV
Kitchen Nobility—the Saucier, Pt. IV
Bakersfield, CA, 05-20-2011 F:  We drove into Wasco, California, and immediately went to our rooms in the local hotel before going out and hitting the bars.  We went to their French restaurant (yes, Wasco has a French restaurant!) called Café Tatti and spent most of the day there and far into the night until it was time to somehow make it back to our lodgings.  The food was superb, the liquor and wine marvelous, and the service exquisite.  We like to eat and between all of us and our spouses, we consumed everything they had on the menu available to diners for that day!  For appetizers, we all had the Pate Maisson as well as the pickled herring as when one is pretty drunk, pretty much everything looks amazingly good and believe me, it was!  The chicken dishes were marvelous and by the time we made it to dessert, hardly any of us could remember our names. 
When you visit any country, be sure to find the wine bars as quickly as possible! There is nothing more distinctive about a nation other than the booze they serve! The same is true of a state such as California, we produce some of the finest wines in all the world and Wasco has some of its own varieties.  Whatever they slapped on the table in front of us, we poured down and the bill came to about $500 for the thirty-plus of us.  This place is a definite must-visit for everyone living in Bakersfield and if you/re visiting here from elsewhere, well, you need to come in and try the food.  I think of all the places we’ve visited so far in our trip around the county, the Café Tatti is by far the best eatery!  Besides, Wasco is a lovely, lovely place and a part of American history as someone told me the town was originally named after Admiral Dewey but then became Wasco in early 1900.  
Yesterday, I was talking about the political situation back home and no matter how hard I try to get away from it; it’s there, following me around like a five-dollar hooker.  Where we come from, a five-dollar hooker, is pretty aggressive, let me tell you, my friends!  Anyhow, the liberals are doing their best to siphon up as much power as is humanly possible and before much longer, they will have the nation completely dependent upon Big Brother and that is precisely what they want! They want to be the supreme ruler of every single citizen and that means, so they think, a lifetime in office. What I like about modern-day Kern County is the freedom that people seem to exercise without restraint and why is it they’re moving forward while moving backward? Is this what you thought would happen to the United States? I never thought any of this was possible but now, I don’t know.  All I know is that I love my country and I have hopes that it will somehow weather the storm and will return to its old self ASAP. 
Enough of my rambling, let’s get going with our latest installment of the Saucier Series, shall we? Let’s begin:
Next up are the white sauces built upon Sauce Veloute (pronounced “vel-loo-TAY”). Veloute is what the uninitiated would call chicken gravy but it’s really much more than that because it’s built upon the powerful chicken stock we’ve already made (#206). This basic sauce is what the rest of our cream sauces will be derived from:
(#276) SAUCE VELOUTE
Yield:   1       Qt :
About an hour:

Qty.
Measure
Item
2
Quarts 
Superior chicken stock
.25
Cup
Melted butter
3/8
Cup
All-purpose flour
2
Teaspoons
Kosher salt
1
Teaspoon
White pepper

Method:
     1. Have stock on at a high simmer. Reduce by half.
     2. Combine remaining ingredients in bowl of an electric mixer. Mix until well-blended and then pour then into a 2 gallon sauce pot and place over low flame.
     3. Cook this roux slowly until it begins to tan. Then, gradually begin whisking in chicken broth a pint or two at a time so that the roux can absorb it without getting lumps.
     4. As you do this, turn the heat up almost all the way as you continue to add the remaining stock. At first, it should appear to be thin which is OK, it’ll thicken but as for now, make sure that there are no lumps.
     5. Allow sauce to simmer after reducing heat to low which will gradually thicken it more. If not thick enough for your needs, make slurry of flour and oil and whisk it in or use your lie. When thick enough, let it cook just a little bit longer in order to incorporate the final additions. Check also for taste and modify as needed.
(#277) SAUCE BÉCHAMEL
     To make Béchamel Sauce, split the liquid 50/50 milk: chicken stock. Generally, you don’t have to worry about scorching due to the water being present.  However, be careful just the same. As for the type of cook that I am, my methods are a little bit revolutionary: I combine my roux mixture and seasonings on the mixer and begin blending in the hot liquid. In this way, I can guarantee myself no lumps. When combined, I return the mixture to the stove to cook it until well-combined and just the thickness that I need.
     Then, I can enrich it further by following any of the four  methods outlined for you:
     a) after sauce has thickened to where I want it to be, I can blend in some of the sauté butter (#215) to really bring the flavor out; or:  b) again, after sauce has thickened to where I want it to be, I can blend in reduced heavy cream which makes it Sauce Supreme. This is more-or-less the ultimate jumping off point for Cream Sauces. Moreover, Sauce Piquante is super-enriched, consisting of 75% heavy cream and 25% Sauce Supreme w/ diced gherkins, capers w/ juice, diced and patted-dry canned pimientos, chopped parsley, chopped chives, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, Tabasco, S & P; However, if my sauce is going to be a gratineed dish of some sort, don’t use a roux because it will break in the oven or underneath the salamander. Instead, reduce cream all the way and finish thickening with lie. The final method is done with
     c) Egg yolks which makes it Sauce Parisienne. To 6 cups of sauce do the following:
     1) Blend 12 egg yolks with 3 cups heavy cream. Then, slowly beat in the Béchamel. By doing it in this manner, you don’t run the risk of curdling the yolks. Continue to do so until all combined and then return the mixture to the sauce pan.
     2) Simmer the sauce over low flame checking for taste. Readjust as necessary and add a few drops of lemju to give a little bit of zest. If too thick, add cream and when OK, pour it through a chinois to capture any coagulated pieces of the inevitable egg white.
     These variations of Béchamel are what all of the next sauces will use as their jumping off point. These are perhaps some of the richest and most vividly smooth sauces in the repertoire of the French.
     The next sauce is the classic cheese sauce upon which many dishes are based. Again, if your intent is on gratineeing a dish, don’t use a butter roux but instead a lie so the butter won’t break and rise to the surface.
(#278) SAUCE MORNAY
      To 2 cups Béchamel, add 1/4 to 1/2 c grated cheese (mixture of Swiss, cheddar, more-or-less whatever you have that you need to get rid of) and use to coat the gratineed item. Too much cheese and it will be goo-ey. Sprinkle w/ parmesan, paprika and a light dust of cayenne pepper and head for the broiler. Otherwise, this versatile sauce can be used meats, seafood, vegetables, pastas, quiches and eggs.
(#279) SAUCE AURORE
     To your Béchamel, blend in tomato puree or paste depending upon how tight your sauce is and how tight you want it to be. Be sure to add some flavor by enriching your sauce with a scoop of sauté butter right before service as well as blending in some freshly chopped herbs (basil, tarragon, chervil or parsley). Then you can either strain these items out or leave them, your call. Sauce Aurore is suitable for vegetables, chicken, fish or veal.
(#280) SAUCE a l’ESTRAGON
     Sauce a l’Estragon is more than just a tarragon sauce suitable for chicken, fish or vegetables. It is a work in of art in itself. When you’re at the basics of preparing the roux for the sauce, sauté some minshall in the butter before combining with the flour. Proceed from there with the rest of the sauce.
     Meanwhile, for maximum flavor, for 2-cups of prepared Béchamel, combine fresh tarragon and chervil with 1 cup dry vermouth and reduce to about an eighth of a cup (2 tablespoons). Blend this herb essence into your sauce and finish with a dab of sauté butter (recipe #215) as you remove it from the heat. If you like, add 1/4-cup of FMP or tarragon to the sauce for visual effect and added flavor.
(#281) CRÈME SAUCE CARI
     When preparing 2-3 cups Béchamel, in the butter used for the roux sauté 1/2-cup of finely minced onion. When onions are tender, add 2-3 + TB of curry powder and cook for several minutes, stirring frequently. Then, add the flour and continue as you would the rest of the way for making your Béchamel. Add some lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste. Enrich it with a little heavy cream and a dab of sauté butter (#215).
(#282) SAUCE SOUBISE
     This sauce has a rather sweet flavor due to the mild caramelization of onions. For 2-3 cups of Béchamel, sauté 2-2-1/2 cups of minced brown onions in the butter portion of the roux slowly over low heat. When very tender, blend in the flour and proceed to making a light tan roux as the onions will slightly discolor the sauce.
     When the sauce is completed and the flavoring is correct, remove from the burner and add some heavy cream to enrich it. If you’re not going to use it to gratineed a dish, add some sauté butter (#218) but if you are, do not use it. A final nice touch is a few fresh gratings of nutmeg.
     The above sauce is one which goes well with everything from veal, chicken, turkey to vegetables and even eggs if you’re a
Frenchman.
(#283) SAUCE aux CAPRES
     Caper sauce is a good accompaniment for fish, chicken or lamb. To your basic Béchamel, add capers and juice to taste after you remove it from the range top. Leave in or strain out per your taste and, if desired, add a little FMP.
(#284) SAUCE a l'MOUTARDE
     Flavor your basic Béchamel with Dijon or stone-ground mustard to taste and add a little lemju to highlight the effect. Upon removing from the range top, blend in a little sauté butter (#215).
(#285) SAUCE aux ANCHOIS
     This final Béchamel is flavored with the juice and ground pulp of anchovies. This sauce is generally used for strong fishes such as mackerel, herring, sword fish or other such types. This sauce would be a product associated with the South of France.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     Tomato-based sauces are a newer arrival upon the European palate because for a century or two, they were considered poisonous. It’s hard to imagine how this could be, that it took that long before some poor starving soul was forced to eat one and survived. Then, they must have exploded onto the scene because southern France, southern Italy and Sicily and other Mediterranean climes went nuts over them.
     It’s hard to imagine how Europe got by without them because up until this time as you well know, they had brown sauces and veloute or Supremes along with egg-based sauces (to be discussed in a little bit) as well as vinegar ones (marinades, to be discussed further along as well). While the former of these two is light and delicate, the latter was used basically to cover the smell of old meat as well as to break it down. There are two others of note which we’ll discuss are mayonnaise-based and those that rely totally upon corn starch such as oriental ones so our study of sauces is far from over!
(#286) FRENCH TOMATO SAUCE
Yield:      1-1/4    Q ________
About an hour:
1.      Combine following ingredients in a stock pot and place over a moderately high flame. It is good if you have a flame-proof pad or a crushed and flattened #10 can to place over the flame to protect the bottom:

Qty.
Measure
Item
.75
Cup
Tomato puree
1
Cup
Espagnole (Veal Stock)
.75
Cup
Tomato juice

     2. Sauté the vegetables and ham stock in another sauce pot.
Make a thin roux and when the tomato mixture is hot, gradually whisk it into the roux mixture making sure that it’s incorporated and that there are no lumps.

Qty.
Measure
Item
1.5
Tablespoons
Melted butter
3/8
Teaspoon
Ham base
3/8
Teaspoon
Minced celery
3/8
Teaspoon
Minced yellow onions
3/8
Teaspoon
Minced carrots
.75
Tablespoon
All-purpose flour
.75
Teaspoon
Sweet basil
.5
Piece
Bay leaf
3/8
Teaspoon
Minced garlic
.25
Teaspoon
Oregano
1
Pinch
Marjoram
1.25
Teaspoons
Kosher salt
1.5
Teaspoons
Fresh minced parsley
3/8
Teaspoon
Black pepper

     3. Let the sauce come up until it’s almost boiling while all the while you’re whisking madly. As soon as it does, keep there for a minute or two and then, lower temp to bare minimum and let it slowly simmer. If it thickens too much after an hour, blend in more tomato juice and readjust the seasonings to taste.
     4. Now, to create a homogenous mixture, run the sauce through a meat grinder using a small grind ring or, if at home, use a blender to make it the consistency of a liquid bordering on puree but not quite there.
     5. Remove from the flame then and bring down to below 45° F as fast as possible or risk it spoiling on you.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Well, my friends, there you go. We keep moving ahead with all of our sauces and I hope that you are enjoying yourselves as much as we are enjoying ourselves.  Also, we hope that our travels throughout Kern County is of interest, too, and that you are learning a great deal about how friends and neighbors go about their daily lives and about how we go about ours. Thank God for a never-ending supply of exotic booze and drink, plus the food that sustains us. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity for us and all I can say is, “We’re loving every minute of it!” See you tomorrow! 
Thank you!
Stinky
Stinkbug
American Bakers’ Association, ACF, CWC

---30---
END Commentary for Friday, July 16, 2010 by “Stinkbug
Please note that everyone who writes for the Elemental News of the Day is their own person entitled to their own opinions, attitudes, and insanity so does not necessarily speak for all of us.  Thanks, Stinkbug.
REFERENCES:
This original essay was authored by the one-and-only Stinkbug.

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This is #1204, a 24” x 36" original oil painting by Beverly Carrick entitled, "American River." It's among her more beautiful works and is available for sale. You can see much more of her work at her Website, located at http://www.beverlycarrick.com or at Brian Carrick's Facebook page. At her Website, you will see not only more original oil paintings but also lithographs, giclees, prints, miniatures, photographs, and even her award-winning instructional video entitled, "Painting the Southwest with Beverly Carrick." Beverly has been painting for more than 60 years and is known around the world. Her work hangs in private and public galleries and is followed by a great many fans that circle the globe. We urge you to go to her Website NOW and view her work. It's possible that you will find something you like and will want to buy it for yourself, a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor! You will not be disappointed so please: do yourself a favor and go there IMMEDIATELY! Thank you, the Elemental News of the Day!
Web Pictures I
This is a photo of the grounds at the Miramar Hotel in Santa Barbara, California, one of the most scenic places in the entire world. This shot was taken during a vacation there in the 1980's.

                                                                   
 This is a photo of Brian Carrick of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers relaxing after a gig on 04-09-1976 at Shamrock once the band had returned home. 

This is a photo of bassist Victor Gaona with his then girlfriend, Denise, at Shamrock during a band rehearsal on 05-17-1976.

This is a photo of hired axeman, Jimmy Hall, on 05-13-1977 at the Holiday Inn in Bakersfield performing with the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers. Jimmy was one of the top guitarists in Bakersfield at the time and if anyone knows where he might presently be, please direct him here to us!

                                                                                                                                                
 This is a photo of the Magnolia Hilltop Brewers on 01-01-1977 after their New Year's Eve gig. Featured is guitarist Randall Kyles (left), bassist Victor Gaona (center), and Vernon McMahon, rhythm guitarist (right) and drummer Brian Carrick (center front). This was one of the classic band line-ups. 

This is a photo of MHB guitarist Randall Kyles on 08-20-1976 at a band rehearsal at Shamrock in Bakersfield, California. Bassist Victor Gaona is in the background.

This is a shot of Brian Carrick's famed Carrot Cake at the Stockdale Country Club in 1989.                                                                
                                                                                                                                                                                                       













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